Journal of Forest Economics
Online ISSN : 2424-2454
Print ISSN : 0285-1598
Volume 64 , Issue 1
Journal of Forest Economics
Showing 1-6 articles out of 6 articles from the selected issue
  • 2018 Volume 64 Issue 1 Pages Cover_1
    Published: 2018
    Released: July 04, 2018
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  • 2018 Volume 64 Issue 1 Pages Toc_1
    Published: 2018
    Released: July 04, 2018
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  • Aturo MIKI
    2018 Volume 64 Issue 1 Pages 4-13
    Published: 2018
    Released: July 04, 2018
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    This paper discussed the policies of human resource development for forestry workers in recent years focusing on “green employment”project. This project had established the education system for workers who are job seekers,new employees or skilled workers. And the project made forestry enterprises recognize necessity of human resource development.These contributed to forestry modernization. However,the project did not completely improve levels of occupational safety and wage.Nowadays, the government probably wants to improve the capability of forestry workers in order to make domestic forestry “growth industry,” but the education for forestry workers by the government should aim for sustainable forest management. Because if the logging productivity and the forest management ability do not advance together, productivity becomes deforestation power.
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  • Evaluation of the Development and Activities of Comprehensive Forest Management Advisors (Foresters) and Forest Practice Planners
    Takafumi OISHI, Norie TAMURA
    2018 Volume 64 Issue 1 Pages 14-25
    Published: 2018
    Released: July 04, 2018
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    In this study, we evaluated the development and activities of Comprehensive Forest Management Advisors(Foresters)and Forest Practice Planners. In addition, we examined issues and measures for the future development and promotion of their activities. As a result, issues common to Comprehensive Forest Management Advisors and Forest Practice Planners were found, including quantitative and qualitative enhancement of human resources, strengthening of cooperation with other forestry personnel, improvement of awareness of human resources, and improvement of career paths and treatment at parent organizations. For improvement of these issues, it is desirable for all personnel in these roles(including candidates)to engage in self-improvement. However, there are issues that cannot be improved through such individual efforts alone. In the future, industry, academia, and government should collaborate to carry out education and training, and create a forestry career path that comprehensively covers from pre- to post-employment.
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  • Case Study in Kagoshima Prefecture
    Yoichiro OKUYAMA
    2018 Volume 64 Issue 1 Pages 26-35
    Published: 2018
    Released: July 04, 2018
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    Vocational high school has not been regarded as a main issue in the discussion on human resource development of forestry, but about 1000 students per year graduate with a specialized subject related to forest and forestry. As a result of investigating Kagoshima prefecture as a case, the number of graduates and employment to the forest industry have also decreased significantly since the1960’s. On the other hand, according to the survey of the high school graduation history about Green Employment trainees, it became clear that the vocational high school graduates occupy the majority. Regarding the influence of specialized education in high school, it should be evaluated not only for new graduates but also for when graduates choose occupations. From the perspective of the point of contact between forestry and school education, it is also necessary to consider the vocational relevance of education in high schools.
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  • A Case Study of the Ubame Oak Forest for Kishu Bincho Charcoal in Wakayama Prefecture
    Satoshi NIINAGA, Kazutake OOSAWA, Kazuaki SAKAGUCHI, Eitoku OTANI, Mas ...
    2018 Volume 64 Issue 1 Pages 36-47
    Published: 2018
    Released: July 04, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This study implements the economic valuations of converting to broad-leaved tree species after the harvest of coniferous species at maturity and clarifies the conditions for such conversion. Taking Wakayama Prefecture in Japan as a case study, we calculated the net present values (NPVs) with infinite multirotations for forest owners. Specifically, we compared the NPVs of the Ubame Oak (Quercus phillyraeoides) forest (UOF) under selective cutting for Kishu Bincho charcoal and the Sugi (Cryptomeria japonica) or Hinoki (Chamaecyparis obtusa) planted forests (SHF) under clearcutting for industrial woods. The results showed that the NPV of the UOF was positive, when Bincho charcoal producers’price was maintained at the current level in the prefecture. The NPV of the SHF was relatively lower despite the availability of government subsidies. Finally, we suggest that forest owners should convert to UOF after harvesting SHF, considering the advantages in terms of NPV. However, this conversion to UOF should be gradual while maintaining Kishu Bincho charcoal’s brand strength, price level, supply capability, target forest area and market growth. Additionally, other incomes are required while training craftspeople to convert their products to Bincho charcoal given that significant growth is not expected in the white charcoal market in Japan.
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