The Journal of General and Applied Microbiology
Search
OR
Browse
Search
Volume 57 , Issue 5
Showing 1-6 articles out of 6 articles from the selected issue
    • |<
    • <
    • 1
    • >
    • >|
Full Paper
  • Charles R. Budinoff, John R. Dunlap, Mary Hadden, Alison Buchan
    Volume 57 (2011) Issue 5 Pages 259-267
    Released: December 03, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A gram-negative, non-motile, pigmented, rod-shaped and strictly aerobic bacterium (CB1052T) was isolated from a temperate estuary. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, strain CB1052T belongs to the α-3 subclass of the Proteobacteria, within the family Rhodobacteraceae, having the highest similarity to members of the genus Marivita (97.8%) of the Roseobacter lineage. Pylogenetic analysis showed CB1052T to be a distinct sister clade to M. litorea and M. cryptomonadis and DNA-DNA relatedness was quite low amongst the strains (< 35%). Strain CB1052T cells are non-motile and display a needle-like filamentous form, where individual cells can become quite elongated (up to 15μm). Similar to M. litorea and M. cryptomonadis, CB1052T harbors aerobic anoxygenic photosynthesis genes. However, in contrast to other described Marivita species, strain CB1052T actively produces bacteriochlorophyll a. Further physiological features, including antibiotic sensitivities, differentiate strain CB1052T from the other members of the genus. Therefore, strain CB1052T is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Marivita, for which the name Marivita roseacus sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain CB1052T (=DSM 23118T =ATCC BAA 1914T).
    View full abstract
    Download PDF (2735K)
  • Nainisha Morar-Bhana, Glynis Valerie Cron, Vincent Myles Gray, Colin J ...
    Volume 57 (2011) Issue 5 Pages 269-276
    Released: December 03, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This study aimed to confirm the identity of three strains of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana from South African soils and to investigate their phylogenetic relationship with non-indigenous strains from other geographic regions. Sequences of the rDNA ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region of 23 strains were compared with the Genbank reference sequences of 20 other cosmopolitan strains. Fitch parsimony and neighbor-joining analyses of the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 regions resolved the strains into two distinct clades and matched them to four species groups/lineages: Beauveria bassiana, B. cf. bassiana (pseudobassiana), B. brongniartii and B. caledonica. Two of the South African strains initially identified as B. bassiana grouped with B. caledonica, whereas the third strain was confirmed as B. bassiana. Because of the paucity of Genbank references for B. caledonica, we have designated the two South African B. caledonica strains as B. sp. aff. caledonica. Other reassignments included two strains from Norway, originally classified as B. bassiana, being grouped with B. brongniartii, and three of the B. brongniartii reference taxa from Brazil which were clearly placed in the B. bassiana clade. The study provides a first report of the presence of the B. caledonica lineage in Africa and confirms current Beauveria phylogenies inferred from molecular data.
    View full abstract
    Download PDF (2084K)
  • Tadafumi Horisaki, Eiko Yoshida, Kaori Sumiya, Tetsuo Takemura, Hisaka ...
    Volume 57 (2011) Issue 5 Pages 277-284
    Released: December 03, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Five Burkholderia strains (CL-1, CL-2, CL-3, CL-4, and CL-5) capable of degrading monochloroacetic acid (MCA) were isolated from activated sludge or soil samples gathered from several parts of Japan. All five isolates were able to grow on MCA as the sole source of carbon and energy, and argentometry and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy analyses showed that these five strains consumed MCA completely and released chloride ions stoichiometrically within 25 h. The five isolates also grew on monobromoacetic acid, monoiodoacetic acid, and L-2-monochloropropionic acid as sole sources of carbon and energy. In addition, the five isolates could not grow with DCA but dehalogenate single chlorine from DCA. Because PCR analyses revealed that all five isolates have an identical group II dehalogenase gene fragment and no group I deh gene, only strain CL-1 was analyzed further. The partial amino acid sequence of the group II dehalogenase of strain CL-1, named DehCL1, showed 74.6% and 65.2% identities to corresponding regions of the two MCA dehalogenases, DehCI from Pseudomonas sp. strain CBS-3 and Hdl IVa from Burkholderia cepacia strain MBA4, respectively. The secondary-structure motifs of the haloacid dehalogenase (HAD) superfamily and the amino acid residues involved in substrate binding, catalysis, and hydrophobic pocket formation were conserved in the partial amino acid sequence of DehCL1.
    View full abstract
    Download PDF (956K)
  • Qi-Ming Wang, Teun Boekhout, Feng-Yan Bai
    Volume 57 (2011) Issue 5 Pages 285-291
    Released: December 03, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A molecular taxonomic investigation performed on basidiomycetous yeast strains isolated from plant leaves collected in two areas of China revealed two novel species, Cryptococcus foliicola sp. nov. (type strain HS 23.3T = AS 2.2471T= CBS 9920T) and Cryptococcus taibaiensis sp. nov. (type strain ST 7.9T = AS 2.2444T= CBS 9919T), among the non ballistoconidium-forming strains producing cream-colored colonies. These new species differed markedly from closely related species in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and 26S rRNA D1/D2 region sequences. They clustered in a strongly supported clade represented by Cryptococcus victoriae in the Tremellales group in the phylogenetic trees drawn from ITS and D1/D2 sequences.
    View full abstract
    Download PDF (2192K)
Short Communication
    • |<
    • <
    • 1
    • >
    • >|
feedback
Top