Journal of Geography (Chigaku Zasshi)
Online ISSN : 1884-0884
Print ISSN : 0022-135X
ISSN-L : 0022-135X
Volume 60 , Issue 2
Showing 1-10 articles out of 10 articles from the selected issue
  • Y. Miyake
    1951 Volume 60 Issue 2 Pages 49-52
    Published: June 30, 1951
    Released: November 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The atmospheric ozone is produced by the photochemical reaction in the air and it is mainly distributed in the stratosphere. The ultra-violet solar, radiation shorter than 2850 Å is absorbed by the ozone layer which. has the thickness of only 0.3 cm when reduced to the normal state. The warm layer in the stratosphere is formed by the light absorption of ozone.
    A review on the relation between the ozone and the, weather is made.
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  • Naomi Miyabe
    1951 Volume 60 Issue 2 Pages 53-56
    Published: June 30, 1951
    Released: November 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Herewith the crustal deformations as revealed by means of precise geodetic surveys are discussed in connection with the crustal deformations revealed as the results of topographical observations, based on the theory of isostasy.
    With regard to the crustal deformations found by geodetic methods, it is pointed out that the acute crustal deformations which might have accompanied the destructive earthquake is seen as occurred in reverse direction against the pre- or post-seismic chronic crustal deformations.
    It is also pointed out that the mode of the acute crustal deformations is such that the earth's crust rises where the gravitational anomalies are positive and vice versa, and that the mode of crustal deformations found as the results of topographical observations seems to agree with that of the acute crustal deformations.
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  • Teiichi Kobayashi
    1951 Volume 60 Issue 2 Pages 56-69
    Published: June 30, 1951
    Released: November 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A critical review is presented here on the geology of Indochina and adjacent territories of South China on the basis of Fromaget's work, 1941, and many other papers mostly by Chinese geologists.
    1) It is suggested that this part of the Chichibu geosyncline was probably brought to existence by the fragmentation of the Microurkraton on the southeastern side of the Cambrian Yangtze basin into the Indosinia and the Reinan-Fukien mass before the Ordovician period.
    2) A series of the crustal movements accompanied by the pre-Uralian plutonism through which the lateral sides of the part was disturbed and consolidated, is called here the Kwansi orogenic cycle, in the honour of Dr. Ting's Kwansi disturbance which was paroxys mal in the cycle.
    3) It is noteworthy that the intrageosynclinal volcanism migrated from Northeast Japan in the Carboniferous and older to Indochina in the Permo-Triassic period.
    4) The early Triassic or possibly older embryonic folds developed in the middle and late Triassic periods into the Akiyoshi orogenic zone which was a uniaxial anticlinorium in Japan, but in west Tonkin triaxial Bruchflaten to which the Nappe of the R. Noire and basic intrusives of Thanh hoa at its possible Wurzel are added. The Schollenüberschiebung of Northeast Tonkin on Southeast Tonkin along the Lansong tectonic line is a remarkable feature in East Tonkin.
    5) A few comments are given on the age of the mouvements majeurs by Jacob, and it is noted that it is possible to be a little older than Noric.
    6) The early and late Jurassic ingressions and later historical 'events are briefly outlined.
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  • Yoshikatsu Ogasawara
    1951 Volume 60 Issue 2 Pages 69-77
    Published: June 30, 1951
    Released: November 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In a continental scope, Japan is regarded as a single agricultural region characterized. by the intensive use of land, rice being dominant. However, if we look at the country more closely, we find that the country is divided into many land use regions differing in agricultural systems.
    The present paper attempts to classify the land use regions by use of the following criteria which are considered as the best clues for the purpose.
    (1) Kind of crops.
    (2) Intensity of farm use.
    (3) Degree of land use in relation to surface features.
    (4) Distribution and use of grasslands.
    (5) Distribution and use of pastures.
    Fig. 1 shows the land use regions of Japan. In Hokkaido, the land use is simple. The three land use regions of Hokkaido conform to those climatic regions arrived at through use of certain values of the mean temperature of the warmest month.
    In old Japan, the land use is intensive and complex. The three major land use regions of old Japan conform not to climatic regions but to those cultural regions classified from the view-point of cultural history and to those population regions delimited by the trends of agricultural population.
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  • Takeshi Ichimura, Hideo Minato, Satoru Oya
    1951 Volume 60 Issue 2 Pages 77-81
    Published: June 30, 1951
    Released: November 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The augite crystals from Sainokawara and Haizuka-yama of the no volcanoes are generally characterized by their elongated prismatic habits like hornblende. Of these, the specimens from Sainokawara are found together with well formed hypersthene crystals. They are obtained from the disintegration products of olivine-bearing two pyroxene andesite and agglomerate.
    Two types of twinning are known in augite crystals. One of these is the crystal with a (100) as the twinning plane, whereas the other is a penetration twin in which two individuals cross each other at an angle of nearly 60°, and its twinning plane is supposed to be W (122).
    As the result of the goniometric experiment, 11 new faces have, been found for augite and 1 new face for hypersthene
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  • [in Japanese]
    1951 Volume 60 Issue 2 Pages 81-88
    Published: June 30, 1951
    Released: November 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
  • [in Japanese]
    1951 Volume 60 Issue 2 Pages 88-91
    Published: June 30, 1951
    Released: November 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1951 Volume 60 Issue 2 Pages 92
    Published: June 30, 1951
    Released: November 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (154K)
  • 1951 Volume 60 Issue 2 Pages 93
    Published: June 30, 1951
    Released: November 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (247K)
  • 1951 Volume 60 Issue 2 Pages 94-96
    Published: June 30, 1951
    Released: November 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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