Journal of Geography (Chigaku Zasshi)
Online ISSN : 1884-0884
Print ISSN : 0022-135X
ISSN-L : 0022-135X
Volume 70 , Issue 3
Showing 1-9 articles out of 9 articles from the selected issue
  • [in Japanese]
    1961 Volume 70 Issue 3 Pages 103-104
    Published: May 31, 1961
    Released: November 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Teiichi KOBAYASHI
    1961 Volume 70 Issue 3 Pages 105-121
    Published: May 31, 1961
    Released: February 25, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Recent results of the studies on the Stratigraphy and Geochronology of the Pre-Cambrian complex in the Baltic shield are summarized. The tripartation of the Pre-Cambrian rocks is suggested where the time-length of the Neo-, Meso-and Eo-Cryptozoic are about 500, 1000 and 1500 my. respectively.
    The vertical and horizontal variation in facies and thickness which are seen in the Eo-Palaeozoic Group of the so-called normal facies on the shield are briefly summarized, and it is compared with that of the Hochgebirgesfacies. For this comparison the section of the Caledonian geosyncline through Jämtland to the Trondheim fjord is outlined.
    Finally, the Geology of the Oslo region is sketched with some details of the Eocambrian and Eo-Palaeozoic Stratigraphy.
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  • Takuzo HIRONO
    1961 Volume 70 Issue 3 Pages 122-133
    Published: May 31, 1961
    Released: November 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A desastrous earthquake occurred in southern Chile at 22 th, 19 : 11 (GMT), May, 1960, the center of which was located by the Coast and Geodetic Survey, U. S. A. at 38° S, 73 1/2 W. Its magnitude is determined as 8.75 by the Matsushiro Observatory. The shock was felt by persons as far distance as 1000 km. to the north in Chile.
    The earthquake and accompanying tsunamis killed 909 of Chilean people and damaged the cities of Concepcion, Valdivia, Puerto Montt, Ancudo etc. It caused crustal deformation along the Chilean coast between 37° to 42° S in latitude. The region around Lebu, Isla Mocha in the north and that around Isla Guafo in the south were upheaved about one meter, while the region between these two subsided about two meters at most. The tsunami originated along and, off the coast of subsided area where big waves assaulted three times with the hight of as large as 10 m and the last one was the highest, while the northern coast than Lebu was visited by far weak tsunami attaining only 1-2 meters in height.
    It travelled over the Pacific to Hawaii killing 61 persons at Hilo, and to Japan killing 119 persons.
    The energy of the tsunami was estimated as the order of 2 × 1023 erg. It is about the same quantity with that of the Kamchatka Earthquake of 1952. One of the reason why it brought such a large damage to Japan is that the tsunami wave which once diverged itself from the origin again converged near Japan owing to the spherical surface of the globe.
    The first phase of the tsunami reached along the coast of Iapan 22 hours later than the occurrence of the earthquake. But the arrival of the largest delayed 1-2 hours more. Its height (double amplitude) attained 5 meters at Hachinohe. It destroyed heavily these villages as Kiritappu in Hokkaido, Ofunato and Shizugawa in Tohoku District, and Ago Bay in Kinki District.
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  • Shiro MAEDA
    1961 Volume 70 Issue 3 Pages 134-139
    Published: May 31, 1961
    Released: November 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In 1957 and 1960, the writer carried out geological survey of the middle of the Katakai River, Toyama Prefecture, with special attention to the Tetori group. As the result, the following new data are obtained :
    1) The formations, narrowly exposed in the valley of the Katakai and Betsumatadani
    Rivers, consist of alternation of conglomerate, sandstone and shale, and are the northeastern extention of the Tetori group along the Joganji and Hayatsuki Rivers.
    2) The presence of the so-called reddish facies and the nature of the conglomerate facies suggest that the formations stratigraphically corresponds to the Shiroiwagawa alternation in the Joganji- gawa district. Therefore, it is believed that the formations belong to the Eo-Cretaceous rather to the upper Jurassic in age as was previously assingned.
    3) The fossil wood, Xenoxylon latiporosum (CRAMER) was newly descovered in these formations. The northern boundary of its distribution reaches the Betsumata valley.
    4) The basement rocks before the deposition of these formations show a very rugged relief.
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  • [in Japanese]
    1961 Volume 70 Issue 3 Pages 140-145
    Published: May 31, 1961
    Released: November 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1961 Volume 70 Issue 3 Pages 146
    Published: May 31, 1961
    Released: November 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (199K)
  • [in Japanese]
    1961 Volume 70 Issue 3 Pages 147-148
    Published: May 31, 1961
    Released: November 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (437K)
  • [in Japanese]
    1961 Volume 70 Issue 3 Pages 148
    Published: May 31, 1961
    Released: November 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (202K)
  • [in Japanese]
    1961 Volume 70 Issue 3 Pages 148a
    Published: May 31, 1961
    Released: November 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (199K)
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