The Journal of the Hattori Botanical Laboratory
Online ISSN : 2432-8944
Print ISSN : 0073-0912
Volume 75
Showing 1-35 articles out of 35 articles from the selected issue
  • R. E. LONGTON
    1994 Volume 75 Pages 1-13
    Published: February 21, 1994
    Released: June 19, 2020
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS

      Polytrichum alpestre shows topoclinal variation in both northern and southern hemispheres. Mean length, dry weight and number of leaves on annual growth increments, and the length of the longest leaves, all decrease progressively with increasing latitude, resulting in the formation, in polar regions, of compact turfs likely to be adaptive in cold, dry environments. Results of an earlier experiment in which plants of three provenances were raised by vegetative propagation in two controlled environments suggested that the pattern observed in the field resulted from genetic differentiation reinforced by phenotypic plasticity. This conclusion was supported by the results of the present experiment, in which plants were grown in a common greenhouse environment from spores collected in four populations in mesic habitats at Churchill (Lat. 58°38'N) and in three populations in mires at Pinawa (Lat. 50°11'N). Differences were again recorded between the northern and southern provenances in annual stem elongation, in the number of leaves produced annually, and in leaf-base length and leaf-limb length. The differences persisted for 13 years, but those for stem elongation and number of leaves were reduced compared with the parent field populations.

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  • RONALD A. PURSELL, BRUCE H. ALLEN
    1994 Volume 75 Pages 15-22
    Published: February 21, 1994
    Released: June 19, 2020
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      Subgenus Pachyfissidens, lectotypified by Fissidens grandifrons Brid., is based essentially on plants with stiff leaves and pluristratose laminal cells. It is an unnatural and taxonomically superfluous taxon. Species assigned to this subgenus are placed in subgenus Fissidens section Aloma C. Müll. (Fissidens sedgwickii Broth. & Dix.), section Amblyothallia C. Müll. (Fissidens grandifrons Brid.), section Crispidium C. Müll. (Fissidens strictus Hook. f. & Wils.), and section Fissidens (Fissidens rochensis Broth. and F. ventricosus Lesq.), subgenus Serridium (C. Müll.) Iwats. (Fissidens boninensis Iwats., F. jaiorum Whitt. & Mill., and F. perdecurrens Besch.), and subgenus Sarawakia (C. Müll.) Iwats. (Fissidens geijskesii Florsch.).

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  • HIRONORI DEGUCHI, TOHRU MATSUI, ZENNOSKE IWATSUKI
    1994 Volume 75 Pages 23-32
    Published: February 21, 1994
    Released: June 19, 2020
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      Pleuridium japonicum is described as new from Japan. It is best defined by development of an annulus, a character previously unknown for the genus, and the cucullate calyptra. The chromosome count is reported to be 2n = 13II. Among the genus Pleuridium, P. japonicum is morphologically most closely related to P. acuminatum, P. palustre, and P. subulatum. All Japanese specimens previously referred to P. subulatum or P. palustre have proven to be P. japonicum.

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  • CELINA M. MATTERI
    1994 Volume 75 Pages 33-40
    Published: February 21, 1994
    Released: June 19, 2020
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      The corticolous Fuegian Tortula subpapillosa Card. et Broth. is reinstated as a species in its own right, having been long misidentified as T. papillosa Wils. in Spruce var. papillosa, and also erroneously placed under synonymy of T. papillosa var. chilensis Thér. A full description and illustration of the species is presented. Distinguishing characters of these taxa in Southern South America are discussed and summarized in a table. Their regional distributions are mapped. Tortula subpapillosa Card. et Broth. is transferred to the genus Syntrichia.

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  • WILLIAM D. REESE
    1994 Volume 75 Pages 41-44
    Published: February 21, 1994
    Released: June 19, 2020
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      There are approximately 20 species of Mitthyridium Robins. (Musci: Calymperaceae) worldwide. The species are classified here into four subgenera: Mitthyridium subg. Mitthyridium, M. subg. Euryphyllum subg. nov., M. subg. Brachycladum subg. nov., and M. subg. Infundibulum subg. nov.

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  • JETTE LEWINSKY
    1994 Volume 75 Pages 45-49
    Published: February 21, 1994
    Released: June 19, 2020
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      A new species of Orthotrichum, O. tenuicaule Lewinsky (subgenus Gymnoporus (Braithw.) Limpr. section Leiocarpa Mol.) is described from Venezuela. Gemmae are reported for the first time from Orthotrichum elongatum Tayl. They are club-shaped and unique in having many longitudinal as well as horizontal walls. Orthotrichum rupestre Schwaegr. var. papillosum Lewinsky is reported for the first time from South America.

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  • WILLIAM R. BUCK
    1994 Volume 75 Pages 51-72
    Published: February 21, 1994
    Released: June 19, 2020
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  • MARIO MENZEL, WOLFRAM SCHULTZE-MOTEL
    1994 Volume 75 Pages 73-83
    Published: February 21, 1994
    Released: June 19, 2020
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      Based on characters of the gametophyte, supported by a mitotic chromosome number of n=6 which is unique within the Meteoriaceae, the section Trachycladiella of the genus Floribundaria is raised to the rank of a genus. The new genus Trachycladiella (Fleisch.) stat. et gen. nov. comprises two species, viz. Trachycladiella aurea (Mitt.) comb. nova and T. sparsa (Mitt.) comb. nova. Both species are distributed from the Himalayas across the subtropical Asiatic mainland to Taiwan and Japan with range extensions into Malesia. Both taxa grow epiphytic as well as epilithic in montane forests usually at medium altitudes.

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  • MASANOBU HIGUCHI, ZENNOSKE IWATSUKI
    1994 Volume 75 Pages 85-95
    Published: February 21, 1994
    Released: June 19, 2020
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      After re-examinations of taxa of Ectropothecium described or reported from New Caledonia, only three species, E. zollingeri (C. Muell.) Jaeg., E. sodale (Sull.) Mitt., and E. pacificum Mitt., are recognized. Eleven taxa are reduced to the synonymy of above three species of Ectropothecium. Four species are excluded from the genus, and other five species were not available for study.

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  • HISATSUGU ANDO, MASANOBU HIGUCHI
    1994 Volume 75 Pages 97-105
    Published: February 21, 1994
    Released: June 19, 2020
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      Hypnum heseleri sp. nov. (Hypnaceae) is described based on an epiphytic specimen collected in Saarland, Germany. The same species is recorded also from two localities in the Netherlands. This moss is remarkably unusual for the genus Hypnum, being characterized by the julaceous habit reminiscent of Myurella julacea, broadly ovate, wrinkled leaves with short twisted acumens, deeply plicate lamina consisting of rhomboidal to broadly linear cells, sinuose subentire margins of leaves, and comparatively large perichaetial leaves with once to thrice twisted acumens. It is most closely related to Hypnum cupressiforme in which an abnormal form with broadly ovate, crisped leaves that mimics this new species is rarely found.

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  • B. O. van ZANTEN, A. HOFMAN
    1994 Volume 75 Pages 107-117
    Published: February 21, 1994
    Released: June 19, 2020
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      The origin and taxonomic status of Hypnum heseleri Ando & Higuchi is discussed. Two hypotheses are proposed: a) the species reached western Europe recently by aerial long-distance dispersal, e.g. from Latin America north of the equator, b) the species is a recent mutant of Hypnum cupressiforme. There is a conflict in evidence between morphology and the electrophoretic data. On the basis of the morphology it is justified to describe the new taxon as a new species, but the electrophoretic data suggest that H. heseleri has no separate gene-pool with H. cupressiforme. In this special case of conflicting evidence we would prefer not to describe the taxon because the electrophoretic data are supported by cross-fertilization data and by the results of culture experiments. This is also the reason why we suppose the second hypothesis as being the most likely one.

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  • L. DENNIS GIGNAC, DALE H. VITT
    1994 Volume 75 Pages 119-132
    Published: February 21, 1994
    Released: June 19, 2020
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      Peatlands, particularly bogs and fens, are found in regions having mean annual precipitation values >500 mm and potential evapotranspiration ratios <1. Peatland development and landforms are related to precipitation and temperature gradients. Differences in surface water chemistry between peatlands are also related in part to the climate. Climate directly affects the distribution and abundance of peatland vegetation in general, and bryophytes in particular. Climate also indirectly affects peatland vegetation through its influence on surface water chemistry.

      Because peatland vegetation is sensitive to climatic variables, it can be used to produce species response surfaces. From these surfaces, indicator communities can be constructed in climatic space. Bryophyte indicator communities and macrofossil assemblages obtained from peat cores can be used to determine past climates. Bryophyte indicator communities can also be used to predict potential effects of global warming on peatland ecosystems.

      Most of the effects of a warmer and dryer climate on peatland ecosystems will result from lower water tables caused by increased evapotranspiration. Lower water tables will produce significant decreases in peat volume by increasing decomposition. Increased decomposition will release more CO2 to the atmosphere thus increasing the effects of global warming. Peatland surface area will also decrease particularly at the southern limits of peatland distribution. Also, lower water levels will change the plant communities by increasing tree cover which will diminish bryophyte cover and may produce communities that do not have modern analogs.

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  • JANICE M. GLIME, ZENNOSKE IWATSUKI
    1994 Volume 75 Pages 133-147
    Published: February 21, 1994
    Released: June 19, 2020
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      In order to determine the physical and chemical effects of a geothermal field on community structure, we sampled two geothermal fields at Ponponyama, Hokkaido, Japan. We measured pH, surface and root zone temperature, and soil humidity.

      Root zone temperature was critical in limiting rooted vascular plants, and high temperatures favored mosses and lichens, which further increase the root zone temperature. Only 35 taxa were present: 1 Cyanobacterium, 3 lichens, 15 bryophytes, and 16 flowering vascular plants, including 4 grasses. All 35 taxa occurred at surface temperatures of 30-40℃, whereas only Campylopus japonicus, Cladina mitis, Cynechocystis sp., and Trematodon longicollis survived at temperatures above 53℃. Diversity decreased with temperature and soil humidity and increased with pH.

      These communities are responsive to the interactive stresses and indicate that stressed communities are likely to be simple in structure.

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  • N. G. SLACK
    1994 Volume 75 Pages 149-159
    Published: February 21, 1994
    Released: June 19, 2020
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      Twenty three mires were studied throughout New York State. Quantitative data were collected for vascular plants, bryophytes and other cryptogams, and for surface water and peat chemistry. The data were compared with a recently completed Natural Heritage Program classification of New York State including peatland (mire) communities. The bryophyte data were analyzed to determine whether one could distinguish mire communities from bryophyte data alone. Rich fens could be easily distinguished by ordination and cluster analysis of the quantitative data from poor fens and bogs, but the several types of rich fens could not. Rich shrub fens had the highest bryophyte species richness; marl fens and bogs the lowest. Sites for rare and endangered species of bryophytes, including the only extant site for Paludella squarrosa, were found in graminoid and sloping rich fens.

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  • VALERY M. DEMBITSKY, TOMAS REZANKA, IRINA A. BYCHEK, OLGA M. AFONINA
    1994 Volume 75 Pages 161-172
    Published: February 21, 1994
    Released: June 19, 2020
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      The composition of total lipids, polar lipids, phospholipids and fatty acids from three moss species was studied. The major phospholipid classes found were phosphatidylcholine (from 25.2 to 72.2%), phosphatidylglycerol (from 7.2 to 28.9%) and phosphatidylethanolamine (from 7.9 to 21.5%). Diacylglyceryltrimethylhomoserine was found in all moss species from 5.9 to 11.9%. The fatty acid composition of mosses was examined by way of capillary GC-MS in the neutral lipid, glycolipid and phospholipid fractions. 61 fatty acids in neutral lipids, 70 fatty acids in glycolipids and 73 fatty acids in phospholipids were identified. The neutral lipid fraction from Anomodon viticulosus yielded 11.7% acetylenic fatty acids among which, some unusual, rarely occurring acids were identified, i.e. 9a, 12-18 : 2, 6a,9, 12, 15-18 : 4 and 8a, 11, 14-20 : 3.

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  • K. DAMSHOLT
    1994 Volume 75 Pages 173-178
    Published: February 21, 1994
    Released: June 19, 2020
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      The taxonomic status of Jungermannia groenlandica Nees, which Schljakov (1980) changed by including Lophozia confertifolia Schiffn., Lophozia heteromorpha Schuster & Damsh., Lophozia murmanica Kaal. and by excluding Lophozia wenzelii (Nees) Steph., is not tenable. It is shown that J. groenlandica is morphologically inseparable from L. wenzelii and thus better kept as a synonym of L. wenzelii. The type material cited in the protologue is shown to consist of two collections, and lectotypification proposed.

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  • DONNA HALL MILLER, HARVEY A. MILLER
    1994 Volume 75 Pages 179-182
    Published: February 21, 1994
    Released: June 19, 2020
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      Mastigophora tuberculata sp. nov. from the Carstensz Mountains differs from M. diclados in having tuberculate leaf cells and tufted or branched paraphyllia.

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  • NAGATOSI KOIKE
    1994 Volume 75 Pages 183-192
    Published: February 21, 1994
    Released: June 19, 2020
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      I recognize 10 species of Frullania species from Babelthuap, Kusaie, Ponape, and Saipan Islands, Micronesia, including three newly described and also three previously unknown species from Micronesia. Some previously reported species are criticized. Phytogeographically, Micronesia forms the Oceanian floral division, together with Polynesia and Melanesia (including New Guinea). Bonin and Volcano Islands in S. Japan, though very close to Micronesia belong to the peri-Japanese floral region. Among 10 Micronesian species reported here, only one, F. serrata, a pantropical species, is also known from Bonin and Volcano Islands.

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  • YOICHI YUZAWA, NAGATOSHI KOIKE
    1994 Volume 75 Pages 193-199
    Published: February 21, 1994
    Released: June 19, 2020
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      Sixteen Frullania taxa are recorded from Nepal. F. pseudoshensiana Hatt. var. darjeelingensis Hatt., F. aposinensis Hatt. & Lin., F. pariharii Hatt. & Thaith. and its forma intermedia Hatt. & Thaith. are new to Nepal, and F. higuchii Yuzawa et al. is described as new to science.

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  • PATRICIA GEISSLER, S. ROB GRADSTEIN
    1994 Volume 75 Pages 201-209
    Published: February 21, 1994
    Released: June 19, 2020
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      Study of the type of the forgotten name Phragmicoma lehmanniana Nees from “Jamaica” shows that this species is a synonym of the common Asiatic Phragmicoma semirepanda (Nees) Gott. & al. and therefore probably mislabeled. A list of correct names of the 114 valid binomina published in the artificial 19th century genus Phragmicoma (=Marchesinia), now assigned to 26 genera, is provided, including 6 new synonymies and a new combination for P. ludoviciana De Not. ex Lehm. in Archilejeunea (=A. porelloides).

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  • R. M. SCHUSTER
    1994 Volume 75 Pages 211-235
    Published: February 21, 1994
    Released: June 19, 2020
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      Generic perimeters in Lejeuneaceae remain imprecise; cytological studies allow redefinition of genera, but the impossibility of using herbarium material (and the often limited and frequently sterile types) for modern systematics limits the application of such data. Relying on study of living plants, supplemented by study of relevant types, some eight new genera (seven not previously described) are segregated. These are: Vitalianthus Schust. & Giancotti, segregated from Drepanolejeunea (Spr.) Schiffn.; Pluvianthus Schust. & Schaefer-Verwimp, whose sole species had been erroneously ascribed to Strepsilejeunea (Spr.) Schiffn.; Prionocolea (Schust.) Schust., elevated from its previous status as a subgenus of Cyclolejeunea Evs.; Cryptogynolejeunea Schust., whose species had been erroneously assigned to Lejeunea subg. Hygrolejeunea Spr. [Hygrolejeunea (Spr.) Schiffn.] ; Dicladolejeunea Schust., with two species, D. anomala, sp. n. and D. saccatiloba (Steph.) Schust., the latter erroneously placed before in Taxilejeunea; Bromeliophila Schust., whose only species had been previously assigned to Peltolejeunea, Anomalolejeunea and Lejeunea; Fulfordianthus Gradstein (1992), identical to Thysanopsis Schust. (1992, without Latin diagnosis), with two species previously placed in Thysananthus orThysano-Lejeunea”; and Macrocolura Schust., a segregate from Colura Dumort., based on three neotropical taxa. Of these eight genera, only Dicladolejeunea is unknown cytologically. These genera are based on taxa previously attributed to a wide variety of genera, i.e.: Hygrolejeunea, Drepanolejeunea, Strepsilejeunea, Cyclolejeunea, Taxilejeunea, Peltolejeunea, Anomalolejeunea, Thysananthus and Colura. The bases for excluding the new genera here described from these earlier-described genera are, in each case, examined.

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  • GABRIELA G. HÄSSEL DE MENÉNDEZ
    1994 Volume 75 Pages 237-242
    Published: February 21, 1994
    Released: June 19, 2020
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      Treubia scapanioides Schust. is reported from a new locality in Southern Chile; male and female plants, as well as sporophytes are described.

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  • B. CRANDALL-STOTLER, T. FURUKI, Z. IWATSUKI
    1994 Volume 75 Pages 243-255
    Published: February 21, 1994
    Released: June 19, 2020
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      Vegetative thalli and immature lateral branches of Mizutania riccardioides Furuki & Iwatsuki are shown, through a combination of serial-sectioning, fluorescent microscopy, SEM and TEM studies, to possess different types of apical organizations. A single geometrically distinct, wedge-shaped apical cell forms the generative center of each rounded, young branch apex, but as the branch matures and assumes mature thallus form, a marginal meristem, centered around two apical notch initials, is established. Divisions in both types of apices are biplanar and all thallus stages are, consequently, unistratose. Although wedge-shaped apical cells with two lateral cutting faces are common in the sporelings and regenerants of other members of the Metzgeriidae, the pluricellular, marginal meristem of the adult thallus is shared with no other hepatic, but more closely resembles the growth system of fern prothalli. Additional unique characters of this exotic taxon include its female inflorescence, marginal rhizoids and elaborate cell wall thickenings. SEM and TEM studies of the latter, show that the wall is a three-layered structure, that is heavily impregnated with some type of lipid material. It can be concluded from this study that Mizutania is not a neotenic morphotype, but is instead a derived member of the Metzgeriidae, with affinities to the suborder Metzgeriineae Schust.

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  • TATSUWO FURUKI
    1994 Volume 75 Pages 257-261
    Published: February 21, 1994
    Released: June 19, 2020
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      The two species of Riccardia subgen. Corioneura Furuki, including R. hattorii, sp. nov., are studied taxonomically. A key to species of the subgenus is provided.

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  • MANUEL MAHÚ
    1994 Volume 75 Pages 263-265
    Published: February 21, 1994
    Released: June 19, 2020
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      Corsinia coriandrina (Spreng.) Lindb. and Riccia ciliata subsp. canescens (Steph.) Schuster are two new species of the chilean hepatic flora. Riccia ciliata subsp. canescens is newly reported for South America.

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  • JIRO HASEGAWA
    1994 Volume 75 Pages 267-273
    Published: February 21, 1994
    Released: June 19, 2020
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      Phaeoceros striatisporus from the Western Himalayas is described as new to science. The present species agrees well with Phaeoceros in its most important characters including the solid, ecostate thalli, the yellowish spores, the stomatiferous capsules and the short, thin-walled elaters. However, the spores are unusual in that they are not tetrahedral but are basically ovoid to spheroid without a triradiate mark, and have canaliculate or striate surface ornamentation. This type of spore has not been found previously in the Anthocerotae. The taxonomic significance of these spore characters is discussed and a new subgenus (Hattorioceros) of the genus Phaeoceros is proposed.

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  • SINIKKA PIIPPO
    1994 Volume 75 Pages 275-293
    Published: February 21, 1994
    Released: June 19, 2020
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      The uplift of New Guinea from the sea ca. 15 Ma years ago provided new areas for the colonization of mainly Gondwanalandic hepatics both from Australia and especially from Indomalaysia. The isolation of high mountain peaks and climatic fluctuations during the Pleistocene together with the presently low temperature regime and constant high humidity in the altitudinal zone between 1,500 and 3,500 m has resulted in the rapid evolution of hepatics and a high degree of hepatic endemism in New Guinea.

      Of Western Melanesian hepatics (New Guinea and the Solomon Islands) 38.2% are endemic. Frullaniaceae, Plagiochilaceae, Radulaceae and Schistochilaceae have most of the endemics. The majority of hepatics have rather wide altitudinal ranges. They are most common (51.9%) in montane forests between 1,500-3,500 m and most frequent at 2,300-2,600 m. Rather many endemics (17.8%) occur in high elevation grassland areas. Fewer have a wide ecological amplitude (9.7%) or occur in habitats disturbed by man (6.5%). Most of the endemics as well as the whole Western Melanesian bryoflora are of Gondwanalandic origin.

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  • H. THORSTEN LUMBSCH, G. BENNO FEIGE, KERSTIN E. SCHMITZ
    1994 Volume 75 Pages 295-304
    Published: February 21, 1994
    Released: June 19, 2020
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      The systematic position of the genus Megaspora formerly included in the Hymeneliaceae (Lecanorales) is reevaluated. Since the genus shares a number of characters with the Pertusariaceae including the hemiangiocarpous ascoma development, zeorine apothecia with a cupulate excipulum and branched paraphysoids forming the epithecium. It is placed within the order Pertusariales rather than the Lecanorales. Since some differences occur between Megaspora and the Pertusariaceae, namely the presence of pale amyloid asci and the absence of a “chambre oculaire” (in Megaspora), it is proposed to place the genus in the Megasporaceae Lumbsch fam. nov.

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  • SOILI STENROOS, TEUVO AHTI
    1994 Volume 75 Pages 305-318
    Published: February 21, 1994
    Released: June 19, 2020
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      A revision of all taxa of Cladonia section Cocciferae reported for Japan revealed 22 species. Cladonia deformis (L.) Hoffm. and C. norvegica Tönsberg & Holien are new to Japan. C. floerkeana (Fr.) Flörke is excluded from the flora of Japan since the Japanese material under this name is considered to represent corticate morphs of C. macilenta Hoffm. Many new typifications of taxa described from Japan are made. Lectotypes are also selected for Cladonia despreauxii Tuck. (= C. cyanipes (Sommerf.) Nyl.), C. hookeri Tuck. (= C. bellidiflora (Ach.) Schaerer) and C. macilenta var. ostreata Nyl. (= C. macilenta Hoffm.). The new synonyms include Cladonia botrytes var. exsoluta Nyl. (= C. koyaensis Asah.), C. hitatiensis Asah. (= C. vulcani Savicz), C. pseudodidyma var. simplicior Asah. (= C. pseudodidyma Asah.), C. pseudomacilenta Asah. and C. pseudomacilenta f. subsquamigera Asah. (= C. vulcani). Only C. inobeana Asah. and C. koyaensis remain endemic to Japan.

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  • SOILI STENROOS, ORVO VITIKAINEN, TIMO KOPONEN
    1994 Volume 75 Pages 319-344
    Published: February 21, 1994
    Released: June 19, 2020
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      Twenty-two species of lichens of the family Cladoniaceae, belonging to the genera Cladia, Cladina, and Cladonia, 9 species of Peltigera and 7 other lichens are reported from Prov. Sichuan, China. Cladonia sinensis Stenroos & J. B. Chen (Hubei, Sichuan) and Peltigera continentalis Vitik. are described as new. Cladonia corniculata Ahti & Kashiw. is reported as new to China. Seven species of Cladoniaceae, and 7 species of Peltigera are new to Sichuan, and also Evernia divaricata (L.) Ach., E. mesomorpha Nyl., Leptogium pedicellatum P. M. Jörg., Lobaria kazawaensis (Asah.) Yoshim., Pseudocyphellaria crocata (L.) Vainio, Solorina saccata (L.) Ach. and Thamnolia vermicularis (Sw.) Schaer. var. subuliformis (Ehrh.) Schaerer are the first records for Sichuan. The presence of Cladina portentosa (Duf.) Follm., Cladonia campbelliana (Vainio) Gyelnik, and C. gracilis (L.) Willd. in Sichuan is doubted. The major aromatic lichen substances were identified in all specimens by thin-layer chromatography. Most of the taxa recorded are essentially circumpolar, and only four of them are Asiatic endemics. On the basis of the macrovegetation, the boundary of orotemperate and oroboreal vegetation zones is at ca. 2500 m. This is tested by mapping the altitudinal distribution of lichens studied. Most of the Cladoniaceae species are oroboreal, and only two species extend their range to the orotemperate zone in Sichuan. Peltigera polydactylon (Necker) Hoffm. is strictly oroboreal in the study area. P. elisabethae, P. leucophlebia, P. membranacea, and P. nigripunctata also occur in the upper part of the orotemperate zone. This is in accordance with their distribution in other parts of the world. The paper includes citation of published illustrations, nomenclature, chemistry, taxonomic notes, distribution in China and total distribution of each taxon.

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  • GERHARD FOLLMANN, MARGOT SCHULZ, SIEGFRIED HUNECK, JÖRG PEINE
    1994 Volume 75 Pages 345-357
    Published: February 21, 1994
    Released: June 19, 2020
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  • KAORU KINOSHISTA, HIDEKI MATSUBARA, KIYOTAKA KOYAMA, KUNIO TAKAHASHI, ...
    1994 Volume 75 Pages 359-364
    Published: February 21, 1994
    Released: June 19, 2020
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      Anti-tyrosinase active compounds were isolated from Protousnea species. One of those had a new skeleton of lichen constituents.

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  • S. HUNECK, H. T. LUMBSCH, I. YOSHIMURA
    1994 Volume 75 Pages 365-369
    Published: February 21, 1994
    Released: June 19, 2020
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      Forty-nine lichen species and a lichenicolous fungus are reported from Korea, mainly the Diamond Mountains. The lichenicolous fungus Dactylospora glaucomarioides is newly reported from Asia.

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  • B. CZECZUGA, S. HUNECK, U. COGT
    1994 Volume 75 Pages 371-377
    Published: February 21, 1994
    Released: June 19, 2020
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      The analysis of 25 lichens from Mongolia gave the following carotenoids: α-carotene, β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, lutein, 3'-epilutein, zeaxanthin, lutein epoxide, antheraxanthin, hydroechinone, canthaxanthin, α-doradexanthin, astaxanthin, violaxanthin, mutatoxanthin, neoxanthin, and capsochrome. The total content of carotenoids ranged from 29.7 (Nephroma helveticum) to 84.2μg per g dry weight (Xanthoria fallax).

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  • 1994 Volume 75 Pages 378
    Published: February 21, 1994
    Released: June 19, 2020
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
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