The Journal of the Hattori Botanical Laboratory
Online ISSN : 2432-8944
Print ISSN : 0073-0912
Volume 82
Showing 1-31 articles out of 31 articles from the selected issue
  • ZENNOSKE IWATSUKI, BENITO C. TAN
    1997 Volume 82 Pages i-ii
    Published: July 15, 1997
    Released: July 05, 2019
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  • RENÉ J. BELLAND, HOWARD CRUM
    1997 Volume 82 Pages 1-14
    Published: July 15, 1997
    Released: July 05, 2019
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  • LEWIS E. ANDERSON
    1997 Volume 82 Pages 15-18
    Published: July 15, 1997
    Released: July 05, 2019
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      A new species, Syntrichia magilliana, is described from Cape, South Africa. It appears to belong to Section Aesiotortula Zand. and is distinguished by thickened outer walls of the dorsal epidermal cells of the costa, which is roughened dorsally. It is known from a single locality.

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  • HISATSUGU ANDO
    1997 Volume 82 Pages 19-25
    Published: July 15, 1997
    Released: July 05, 2019
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      The Japanese race of Hypnum callichroum is newly described as subsp. japonicum, which is differentiated from the subsp. callichroum by the smaller-sized plants usually showing more close branching and foliation, and the somewhat shorter lamina cells and setae. It is also distinct in the high fertility and a substratum preference for decayed wood and tree-trunks. An appendix is given to include a preliminary list of the species belonging to Hypnum sect. Hamulosa and their distribution.

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  • IRWIN M. BRODO, ROLF SANTESSON
    1997 Volume 82 Pages 27-37
    Published: July 15, 1997
    Released: July 05, 2019
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      The Queen Charlotte Islands, an oceanic archipelago off the west coast of British Columbia, has a rich maritime lichen flora including a number of species of Verrucaria. Two of these species appear to be new to science and are described here: V. epimaura Brodo and V. schofieldii Brodo. In addition, there are several unnamed entities that may eventually be recognized as species. To facilitate placing these new or unnamed taxa within the context of known west coast species of Verrucaria, a key including all these species is presented.

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  • WILLIAM R. BUCK
    1997 Volume 82 Pages 39-46
    Published: July 15, 1997
    Released: July 05, 2019
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      Schofieldiella is newly described for Stereodon micans Mitt. The species has mostly been placed in Hygrohypnum by North American authors and in Sematophyllum by Europeans. Rather, it seems most closely related to the Himalayan Leptocladiella of the Hylocomiaceae.

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  • D. C. CARGILL, G. A. M. SCOTT
    1997 Volume 82 Pages 47-60
    Published: July 15, 1997
    Released: July 05, 2019
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      The genus Sphaerosporoceros Hässel and Aspiromitus Section Brachyanthoceros Schuster are reviewed and treated as Anthoceros subgenus Sphaerosporoceros subg. nov. Anthoceros granulatus is reduced to a sub-species of A. adscendens.

      Based on elater and spore characters, specimens collected from the northern region of Western Australia and Northern Territory, are compared to A. adscendens, A. granulatus and A. macounii. They are found to be a new species, A. capricornii Cargill & Scott within the new sub-genus.

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  • JOHN A. CHRISTY, JUDITH S. HARPEL
    1997 Volume 82 Pages 61-75
    Published: July 15, 1997
    Released: July 05, 2019
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      A total of 810 bryophyte taxa have been reported from the interior Columbia River Basin and northern Great Basin, a study area encompassing all or parts of seven U.S. states. Of these taxa, 409 have five or fewer occurrences in the study area. Exclusion of “problem” taxa and incompletely identified subspecific material produces a list of 296 potentially rare taxa. Of seven ecological provinces present in the study area, the northern Rocky Mountains host the most taxa, dominated by circumpolar and disjunct elements, with a strong showing of eastern North American elements. The east slope of the Cascade Range has the greatest number of endemic and Mediterranean taxa. The arid lowlands of the Intermountain region have the greatest number of southern arid taxa, but are very poorly collected bryologically.

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  • HOWARD CRUM
    1997 Volume 82 Pages 77-98
    Published: July 15, 1997
    Released: July 05, 2019
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  • HIRONORI DEGUCHI, JUNKO UENO, TOMIO YAMAGUCHI
    1997 Volume 82 Pages 99-104
    Published: July 15, 1997
    Released: July 05, 2019
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      Taxonomic relationship among species of Diphyscium with unipapillose leaf cells is discussed. Diphyscium unipapillosum Deguchi from Japan and D. buckii Tan from the Philippines are reduced to synonyms of D. chiapense Norris known from Mexico. Taxonomic position of Diphyscium poscii (Bizot) Zand., which was originally described from Tanzania under the genus Pseudotimiella of Pottiaceae, is also discussed. The collared axillary hairs found in Pseudotimiella poscii support the transfer of this species from Pottiaceae to Diphysciaceae.

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  • ALISON J. DOWNING, PATRICIA M. SELKIRK, RONALD J. OLDFIELD
    1997 Volume 82 Pages 105-121
    Published: July 15, 1997
    Released: July 05, 2019
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      In 1906, Reverend W. W. Watts collected mosses in the vicinity of Yarrangobilly Caves, a limestone area in the Southern Alps of New South Wales and in 1912, with Brotherus, published a list of these species. This study updates the taxa recorded by Brotherus and Watts and compares the species collected by Watts in 1906 with our own recent (1993) collections.

      Most of the mosses collected by Watts are still present in the area. The few species no longer found in the immediate vicinity of Yarrangobilly are known from other locations in the Southern Alps of eastern Australia. Certain bryophyte taxa were not collected by Watts in 1906 but are now conspicuous components of the bryofiora at Yarrangobilly. Changes to the moss assemblage at Yarrangobilly are attributed to a range of environmental changes resulting from European settlement and development.

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  • JANICE M. GLIME, ZENNOSKE IWATSUKI
    1997 Volume 82 Pages 123-141
    Published: July 15, 1997
    Released: July 05, 2019
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      To examine interaction among species in a stressed community, vegetation samples were taken at the geothermal area of Wakoto, Hokkaido, Japan. Only 17 macrophytic species occurred, and these could easily be separated into niches based on soil pH, surface and root zone temperatures, moisture, and distance from vent. Competition among bryophytes and between bryophytes and vascular plants was evidenced in bimodal distributions of the species along temperature, moisture, and pH gradients. The tall grass Miscanthus sinensis occupied 100% coverage in the pH range of 5.0 to 5.5, causing a bimodal pH distribution in the liverwort Jungermannia infasca and the short grass Fimbristylis dichotoma. A similar bimodal distribution in the liverwort Odontoschisma denudatum may result from the abundance of the moss Hypnum plumaeforme at the mid soil moisture range. Vascular plants were restricted to the lower end of the soil temperature range, whereas soils with higher temperatures were solely occupied by bryophytes and Cyanobacteria. This provides evidence for competition between bryophytes and with vascular plants, and documents the ability of bryophytes to occupy areas unsuitable for rooted vascular plants. It also supports the concept that bryophytes have a wider range of tolerance than do most vascular plants, but that they are not good competitors with them for physical space.

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  • TREVOR GOWARD, TEUVO AHTI
    1997 Volume 82 Pages 143-155
    Published: July 15, 1997
    Released: July 05, 2019
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      Based on the western North American distributions of 71 taxa and chemotypes of Cladina and Cladonia occurring at temperate and boreal latitudes, the Coast Mountains of British Columbia are shown to form a major phytogeographic barrier, dividing 21 oceanic taxa to the west from 24 continental taxa to the east. Maximum floristic diversity in these genera occurs between 52°N and 56°N, in a region occupied by glacial ice until roughly 10,000 years ago. Following deglaciation, many Cladoniaceae must have colonized this region from south of the Cordilleran Icesheet, presumably deriving from regions that no longer support them. South of 52°N, modem-day rates of decline average between three and five taxa per degree of latitude, and appear to be correlated with a southward trend from summer-moist climatic conditions to summer-dry. By contrast, the present southern limits of Cladina stellaris, Cladonia macroceras and C. stricta are believed to reflect historical, as opposed to strictly ecological, factors. Such species may still be extending their ranges southward.

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  • TERRY T. MCINTOSH
    1997 Volume 82 Pages 157-169
    Published: July 15, 1997
    Released: July 05, 2019
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      The biogeography of bryophytes of the semi-arid steppe of south-central British Columbia Province, Canada, was discussed under three major elements: the widespread elements, endemic elements and disjunctive elements. Possible causal explanations and illustrative bryophytes are provided for each of the three elements to elucidate the complex issues of biogeography involved.

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  • NORTON G. MILLER
    1997 Volume 82 Pages 171-180
    Published: July 15, 1997
    Released: July 05, 2019
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      Fossils of leafy branch and stem fragments representing 21 moss species (and seven others identified only to genus) were recovered from flood plain sediment in a terrace along the Wood Creek valley, Washington County, eastern New York State. Three deposits, 4000, 3500, and 2800 radiocarbon years old, contained similar assemblages, indicating that the paleobryofloras did not differ greatly during the 1200 years separating these late Holocene deposits. Represented were species of wet or mesic, streamside habitats, and epiphytic and epilithic mosses were present also. Species of calcareous and acidic substrata were identified. Likely source areas for the mosses were habitats on the flood plain and valley slopes close to the site of burial. While alluvial sediment has been neglected as a source of fossil mosses, it is likely that alluvium in both glaciated and nonglaciated regions will yield fossils that may prove revealing phytogeographically as well as in studies of Quaternary paleoecology. Such deposits contain samples of the upland bryoflora, about which little is known for much of the Holocene.

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  • NAOKI NISHIMURA
    1997 Volume 82 Pages 181-183
    Published: July 15, 1997
    Released: July 05, 2019
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      Eurhynchium latifolium, which has been known only from Korea, is newly found from the calcareous area of Okayama-ken, SW-Japan. Detail description, illustrations and some notes on the species are given.

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  • DANIEL H. NORRIS
    1997 Volume 82 Pages 185-189
    Published: July 15, 1997
    Released: July 05, 2019
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      California can be seen as the southernmost tip of a humid peninsula extending from British Columbia and southern Alaska. The moss flora of California is largely a depauperate representation of the very rich flora of coastal British Columbia. A major area of depletion of that rich northern flora is seen at the boundary of California with Oregon. The paper includes a list of moss species endemic to California, and includes an evaluation of the habitats of those species whose range limits approximately coincide with the California-Oregon border.

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  • SINIKKA PIIPPO, TIMO KOPONEN
    1997 Volume 82 Pages 191-201
    Published: July 15, 1997
    Released: July 05, 2019
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      The affinities of the moss floras of Australia, Borneo, Bhutan, Ceylon, Hawaii, Korea, the Lesser Sunda Islands, New Zealand, Peninsular Malaysia, the Philippines, the Society Islands, Taiwan and Western Melanesia were studied by Kroeber's percentage of similarity. Three main areas of affinity can be noticed: (1) Australia and New Zealand, (2) New Guinea and neighbouring Melanesia, and (3) northern areas represented by Bhutan and Korea. The disjunct floras of Hawaii and the Society Islands do not show a close relation to the other areas. This can be explained by different distributional elements of the bryoflora, such as (1) The element of pantropical species or widely distributed southeast Asiatic to Pacific species occurring in most of the recorded areas, (2) SW Asiatic species of possibly Laurasian origin, (3) Originally Gondwanalandic taxa that spread in early times by Sunda fragments and went through speciation in Melanesia, (4) A southern Gondwanalandic element present mainly in New Zealand and Australia, (5) High elevation taxa disjunct from the boreal to temperate areas of northern hemisphere, and (6) Endemic species.

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  • RONALD A. PURSELL
    1997 Volume 82 Pages 203-212
    Published: July 15, 1997
    Released: July 05, 2019
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      Fissidens obtusifolius Wilson belongs to section Fissidens; it is distinguished from other American species in this section by its ovate to oblong leaves with rounded to broadly obtuse apices. This calciphilic species is endemic to North America, extending from lower Ontario south to Florida and westward to Utah and Texas. Fissidens obtusifolius var. apiculatus Grout is placed in the synonymy of F. sublimbatus Grout. The latter is allied with F. crispus from which it is distinguished by its elimbate to variably limbate and sharply apiculate leaves with dorsal laminae that narrow abruptly and end above the insertion. Fissidens sublimbatus is found typically on soil in the drier areas of western and southwestern United States and northern Mexico. Fissidens obtusifolius var. kansanus Renauld & Cardot and var. marginatus Flowers are subsumed under F. obtusifolius. Fissidens exiguus Sull. is placed in the synonymy of F. bryoides Hedw. var. pusillus (Wilson) Pursell.

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  • HELEN P. RAMSAY
    1997 Volume 82 Pages 213-226
    Published: July 15, 1997
    Released: July 05, 2019
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      Chromosome numbers are given for 14 species in 7 genera of Polytrichales (Polytrichaceae and Dawsoniaceae), various species being from Australia, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea or Vanuatu (New Hebrides). New records include Notoligotrichum australe (Psilopilum) n=7, Pogonatum neesii n=7, Pogonatum cirrhatum n=7 and 14, Polytrichastrum alpinum n=7. Although chromosome counts have been listed previously for Polytrichum commune n=7, Dawsonia beccarii n=7, and D. crispifolia n=7 some further details are included here. Previously published counts for Atrichum androgynum n=14, Polytrichum juniperinum n=7, Pogonatum subulatum n=7, Polytrichadelphus magellanicus n=7, Dawsonia longiseta n=7, D. polytrichoides n=7, 2n= 14 and D. longifolia (D. superba var. pulchra) n=7, 2n= 14 are confirmed from studies of additional populations.

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  • WILLIAM D. REESE
    1997 Volume 82 Pages 227-244
    Published: July 15, 1997
    Released: July 05, 2019
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      The roles in asexual reproduction played by leaves and gemmae of species of Calymperaceae range from one extreme, in which the fragile leaves of some species serve as propagules, through the single species in which the tips of leaves regularly dehisce to function as propagules, to the other extreme, in which some leaves are highly specialized for production, protection, and active participation in dispersal of regularly produced foliar gemmae. There is a wide variety of intermediate roles and morphologies. It seems likely that in most taxa the gemmae are detached from the parent plant by the action of rainfall. Some species of Calymperaceae have no apparent means of asexual or sexual reproduction. Suites and subsuites of species are identified based on mode (or lack) of asexual reproduction, representative examples of the anatomy and morphology of gemma production and dispersion are described and illustrated, and some implications are presented for the evolution of asexual reproduction in Calymperaceae.

      Syrrhopodon peguensis (E. Bescherelle) W. D. Reese is a new combination based on Calymperes peguense E. Bescherelle.

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  • HAROLD ROBINSON
    1997 Volume 82 Pages 245-251
    Published: July 15, 1997
    Released: July 05, 2019
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      The occurrence of stomates in bryophytes and tracheophytes is briefly reviewed. It is argued that the stomate is not a simple structure and that it could not evolve by simple processes. The schizogenous nature of the stomatiferous internal air system is emphasized, and the occurrence is noted of stomates in gametophytes as well as sporophytes of early land plants. It is considered possible that the internal air systems of Marchantialean Hepaticae and the stomatiferous systems of other land plants have a common evolutionary origin.

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  • R. M. SCHUSTER
    1997 Volume 82 Pages 253-259
    Published: July 15, 1997
    Released: July 05, 2019
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  • JOHN R. SPENCE
    1997 Volume 82 Pages 261-270
    Published: July 15, 1997
    Released: July 05, 2019
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      Similarity graph analysis using Gower's coefficient of similarity was performed on a group of 23 genera assembled from the Leskeaceae, Pterigynandraceae and Thuidiaceae. Results using 14 gametophytic characters support the generic placement and family limits proposed by W. R. Buck and H. Crum in 1990 with only two exceptions. Bryohaplocladium is shown to be a typical member of the Thuidiaceae, to which it is returned in this study. Pseudoleskeopsis, traditionally included in the Leskeaceae, is shown to be very distinct from all other genera in the study, and does not belong in any of the three families studied. The analyses show clearly defined subfamily structure in the Leskeaceae but not in the Pterigynandraceae.

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  • ILMA G. STONE
    1997 Volume 82 Pages 271-279
    Published: July 15, 1997
    Released: July 05, 2019
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      A new species, Archidium clarksonianum, is described and illustrated. A comparison is made with the lectotype of A. indicum Hampe & C. Muell., which it resembles in growth form, large, lax cells and narrow costa.

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  • HEINAR STREIMANN
    1997 Volume 82 Pages 281-304
    Published: July 15, 1997
    Released: July 05, 2019
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      The genera studied previously contained 14 species: 4 are recognised now and one species is reduced to a variety. The accepted taxa are: Achrophyllum dentatum (Hook. f. & Wils.) Vitt & Crosby, Callicostella papillata (Mont.) Mitt. var. papillata, C. papillata var. prabaktiana (C. Muell.) Streim. comb. nov., Chaetomitrium tahitense (Sull.) Mitt., Cyclodictyon blumeanum (C. Muell.) O. Kuntze. All previous endemic species have been synonymized: Pterygophyllum bryoides Broth., P. obscurum Mitt., P. fiaccidissimum Broth. and P. wattsii Broth. are Achrophyllum dentatum; Callicostella baileyi (Broth.) Broth. is C. papillata var. papillata; C. kaernbackii Broth. ex Fleisch. and C. rugiseta Dix. are C. papillata var. prabaktiaria; Cyclodictyon lepidum (Mitt.) Broth. & Watts is C. blumeanum. Pteryogophyllum subrotundum (Hampe) Jaeg. is a Distichophyllum while Chaetomitrium endtodontoides Broth. & Watts belongs in Glossadelphus (Hypnaceae). A key is provided for the 9 known Australian Hookeriaceae genera. Extensions to known range are reported for Achrophyllum dentatum to Papua New Guinea, Callicostella papillata var. papillata to the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu, and Cyclodictyon blumeanum to the Solomon Islands.

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  • BENITO C. TAN, JIA YU
    1997 Volume 82 Pages 305-320
    Published: July 15, 1997
    Released: July 05, 2019
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      A total of 57 genera and 109 species of mosses are reported based on collections made from the 1995 expedition to Yushu Prefecture of Qinghai province. Didymodon gaochienii and Orthomitrium schofieldii are described new to science. Encalypta intermedia, Hygrohypnum polare and Leptopterygynandrum austro-alpinum are three moss records that have not previously been reported from China. Significant range extensions are reported for Amblyodon dealbatum, Conardia compacta, Distichium hagenii, Grimmia anodon, Leptopterygynandrum subintegrum, Oedipodium griffithianum, Orthotrichum pumilum, Philonotis calcarea, Plagiobryum demissum and Pylaisiella falcata. In addition, four new synonyms are proposed with their respective accepted names placed inside brackets: Aloina rubripila Aziz & Vohra [=Aloina rigida var. obliquifolia (C. Muell.) Delgad.], Barbula anserino-capitata X.-J. Li [=Didymodon johansenii (Williams) Zand.], Barbula longicostata X-J. Li [=Didymodon constrictus var. flexicaulis (Chen) Saito] and Tortula longimucronata X.-J. Li [=Syntrichia ruralis (Hedw.) Web. & Mohr].

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  • BARBARA M. THIERS
    1997 Volume 82 Pages 321-328
    Published: July 15, 1997
    Released: July 05, 2019
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      Two new taxa of Cheilolejeunea from Australia are described and illustrated: Cheilolejeunea incisa var. teretiftora n. var. and Cheilolejeunea parvidens n. sp. A key to the 17 taxa of Cheilolejeunea in Australia is provided.

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  • DALE H. VITT, CARL DARIGO
    1997 Volume 82 Pages 329-335
    Published: July 15, 1997
    Released: July 05, 2019
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      Orthotrichum elegans can be separated from O. speciosum by smaller, more compact plants; smooth capsules that are emergent to shortly exserted; and occurrence restricted to tree trunks and branches. In North America, it is a boreal species known largely from east of the western cordillera and has a distribution that is quite different from that of O. speciosum. Although in the past O. elegans has generally been considered as a subspecific entity of O. speciosum, the distinct morphology, habitat, and distribution indicates that it warrants recognition as a species distinct from O. speciosum.

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  • KOHSAKU YAMADA
    1997 Volume 82 Pages 337-342
    Published: July 15, 1997
    Released: July 05, 2019
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      Two new species, Radula eggersii and R. schofieldiana from the Neotropica are described and figured.

      The author's study of the Radula in Neotropica have been carried out since 1980 and are still continuing. At this time, I was able to study the Radula specimens from Neotropica in the herbaria of J. Eggers and of Friedlich-Schiller Universitat (JE), through the courtesy of Mr. J. Eggers and Dr. R. Grolle. Consequently, I recognized two species new to science whose descriptions and illustrations are below.

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  • ISAO YOSHIMURA, KRISHNA P. SINGH, JOHN A. ELIX
    1997 Volume 82 Pages 343-352
    Published: July 15, 1997
    Released: July 05, 2019
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      Three species of Anzia (Lecanorales, lichenized fungi), are reported from India. A. kohimana sp. nov. is described as a new species and A. physoidea Smith is typified. By comparison with the rich diversity of species of Anzia in south-eastern Asia, India is rather poorly represented and the species are rare in occurrence.

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