The Journal of the Hattori Botanical Laboratory
Online ISSN : 2432-8944
Print ISSN : 0073-0912
Volume 97
Showing 1-20 articles out of 20 articles from the selected issue
  • SI HE
    2005 Volume 97 Pages 1-38
    Published: January 25, 2005
    Released: September 19, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

      Leptopterigynandrum C. Müll. is a pleurocarpous moss genus consisting of ten species [L. austro-alpinum C. Müll., L. autoicum Dix. ex Gangulee & Vohra, L. brevirete Dix. in Blatter & Fernandez, L. decolor (Mitt.) Fleisch., L. incurvatum Broth., L. piliferum S. He, sp. nov., L. stricticaule Broth., L. subintegrum (Mitt.) Broth., L. tenellum Broth., and L. tenuicaule (Williams) S. He, comb. nov.]. It is characterized by the densely verrucose leaf cells, multi-rows of quadrate alar cells, double, often forked costae, subjulaceous to julaceous leafy stems, and reduced hypnoid peristome (cross-striolation and cilia absent). The generic placement in the Leskeaceae ratherthan its traditional placement in the Thuidiaceae is supported.

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  • MATT A. M. RENNER
    2005 Volume 97 Pages 39-79
    Published: January 25, 2005
    Released: September 19, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

      Radula javanica a widespread Melanesian-oceanic species is recorded from the Kermadec Islands, the northern most landmass within the New Zealand Botanical District. The specimens upon which the New Zealand record of R. campanigera is based present themselves as an unusual taxon close to R. cordiloba, which is described as a new subspecies. R. cordiloba ssp. erigens M. Renner et Braggins ssp. nov. This taxon is known from only two collections from the Kermadec Islands. Radula cordiloba ssp. erigens differs from R. cordiloba in its unique localisation of caducous leaves on secondary branches which are determinate in growth, and the broadly ovate lobules that occasionally extend beyond the opposite stem margin. Radula campanigera is accordingly excluded from the New Zealand flora. The ranges of four more Radula species are extended to New Zealand: R. aneurysmalis, R. compacta, R. ratkowskiana and R. tasmanica were previously considered endemic to Tasmania; Radula tabularis is excluded from the New Zealand flora, specimens upon which this record is based are referable to R. ratkowskiana and R. tasmanica. Radula sainsburiana is reported new to Tasmania, and outside of New Zealand for the first time. Descriptions and illustrations of all seven species discussed are provided, as is a key to species of Radula currently known for New Zealand and Tasmania.

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  • JOHN J. ENGEL, JOHN E. BRAGGINS
    2005 Volume 97 Pages 81-96
    Published: January 25, 2005
    Released: September 19, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

      Current classification of the New Zealand hepatic Megalembidium insulanum (Mart. & Hodgs.) Schust. in Lepidoziaceae and in subfamily Lepidozioideae is discussed. Recent discovery of the gynoecium and sporophyte, together with detailed studies of the androecium, show that Megalembidium is beyond the circumscription of subfamily Lepidozioideae. The genus is placed in a new subfamily, subfam. Megalembidioideae. Affinities of subfam. Megalembidioideae and subfam. Lembidioideae, particularly Isolembidium, are discussed.

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  • JAIME AGUIRRE-C., J. ORLANDO RANGEL-CH.
    2005 Volume 97 Pages 97-116
    Published: January 25, 2005
    Released: September 19, 2018
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      The mosses of the Chocó biogeographic region of Colombia comprise a total of 132 species in 24 families and 60 genera. This subset represents 14% of the species, 22% of the genera, and 35% of the families reported for the country.

      The richest families in genera and species are: Pilotrichaceae (12 genera/36 species), Calymperaceae (3/20), Sematophyllaceae (5/12), Neckeraceae (4/7) and Pterobryaceae (4/7). The most species-rich genera are Fissidens (9), Syrrhopodon (9), Lepidopilum (8) and Calymperes (6).

      Analysis with reference to the major altitudinal/ecological zones reveals the following pattern: Region I, which includes the estuaries and lacustrine landscapes of the alluvial plains and low hills and terraces (0-200 m), is characterized by 91 species in 38 genera and 20 families; in the mid to higher elevations (>200-1000 m) of ecogeographic Region II there are 40 species in 31 genera and 18 families.

      Epiphytes are the most diverse growth form, with 105 species, and are especially prevalent in region I. Neotropical taxa predominate in the Chocó phytogeographical region (49.2% of species), followed by those of Mesoamerican and wide continental distribution.

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  • UWE DREHWALD
    2005 Volume 97 Pages 117-126
    Published: January 25, 2005
    Released: September 19, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

      A biomonitoring system for the observation of disturbance in neotropical rainforest was developed using bryophytes as indicators. It can be applied in wide parts of the Neotropics between sea level and 2000 m altitude. For its practical application the computer program 'Bryomonitor' was developed. The biomonitoring system is based on field studies in different rainforest areas of Bolivia, Ecuador and Peru. In each area the changes of the bryophyte vegetation with increasing forest disturbance was studied.

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  • LAURA L. FORREST, BARBARA J. CRANDALL-STOTLER
    2005 Volume 97 Pages 127-159
    Published: January 25, 2005
    Released: September 19, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

      An eight locus analysis using sequences from the chloroplast rbcL, rps4, psbA, atpB and trnLUAA regions, the mitochondrial nad5 region and nuclear 3' LSU and SSU regions for 64 liverworts, nine mosses and five hornworts resolves five well supported lineages within the Marchantiophyta. Treubia K. I. Goebel and Haplomitrium Nees form a clade that is sister to all other extant liverworts. The Blasiaceae H. Klinggr. is sister to the monophyletic Marchantiopsida Stotler & Crand.-Stotl. The Metzgeriineae R. M. Schust. ex Schljakov and Jungermanniidae Engl. emend. Stotler & Crand.-Stotl. are both monophyletic but their relationship to each other is equivocal. Although a sister group relationship is resolved, this node is not strongly supported. All of the remaining simple thalloids, i.e. the Fossombroniales Schljakov emend. Stotler & Crand.-Stotl., the Pallaviciniineae R. M. Schust. emend. Stotler & Crand.-Stotl. and Phyllothallia E. A. Hodgs., form a well-supported clade. The resolution of relationships within the liverworts is improved by the addition of both taxa and sequence characters.

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  • C. GARCIA, C. SÉRGIO, M. SIM-SIM
    2005 Volume 97 Pages 161-181
    Published: January 25, 2005
    Released: September 19, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

      The composition, abundance, and species richness of epiphytic communities on Quercus faginea Lam., Quercus pyrenaica Willd., and Quercus rotundifolia Lam. was examined in native woodlands in distinct sites of Centre and Northern Portugal, included in the Natura 2000 Network. The dependence upon a number of environmental variables was investigated in thirteen sites in Portugal. Sixty one bryophytes (50 mosses, 11 liverworts) were found in the plots along thirteen sites. Multivariate analysis was used to examine the epiphytic bryophyte composition of these woodlands. Relationships between bryophyte and lichen community composition, climate and stational variables were examined using Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA). The total biodiversity found in the sites surveyed, including branches and other phorophytes associated with Quercus spp. was about 111 bryophyte taxa.

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  • KRISTIAN HASSEL, LARS SÖDERSTRÖM
    2005 Volume 97 Pages 183-193
    Published: January 25, 2005
    Released: September 19, 2018
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      Orthodontium lineare and Campylopus introflexus are two species originally from the Southern Hemisphere. They were introduced to Europe in the early 20th century and have since expanded over much of Western Europe. The time-course of expansion in continental Europe is mapped. The expansion phase of the two species in Britain is described as the cumulative number of vice-counties where they have been found over time. This is compared with related native species from the same environment to avoid effects of sampling intensity.

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  • HELENA KORPELAINEN, MARIA POHJAMO, SANNA LAAKA-LINDBER
    2005 Volume 97 Pages 195-205
    Published: January 25, 2005
    Released: September 19, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

      Migration leading to gene flow increases the level of genetic variation within populations and prevents genetic differentiation among populations. The extent of gene flow is generally examined using indirect methods utilizing either protein or DNA markers. Based on the analysis of genetic differentiation among bryophyte populations, it is evident that most species have a fair amount of gene flow occurring between their populations. So far, the level of knowledge concerning hepatics is more limited than that of mosses. Factors influencing the estimates of gene flow are discussed.

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  • DENIS LAMY
    2005 Volume 97 Pages 207-226
    Published: January 25, 2005
    Released: September 19, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

      Camille Montagne (D.M.) was a military surgeon in the Napoleon army. After his retirement in 1834 he moved to live in Paris, not far from the Museum and the Delessert's collections. Since 1821, he was interested in studying the cryptogams that he collected from places where he was posted and the many that he had received in exchange. He was soon recognized as the cryptogamist of Paris. He identified all the cryptogams from a number of expeditions organized by the French government or by the Museum. His contribution to the bryoflora of South America is obvious as seen by the publication of many short notes and his contributions to the major floras of Brazil, Bolivia, Chile, Peru, Guyana, etc. His herbarium, including many types, contains more than 13,700 bryophyte specimens, 16% of which are from South America. On the basis of unpublished sources (correspondence, notes, labels of herbarium) and of his publications, the contributions of Montagne to the knowledge of South American bryophytes is reported and analyzed.

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  • YELITZA LEÓN V., MARÍA SILVINA USSHER M.
    2005 Volume 97 Pages 227-231
    Published: January 25, 2005
    Released: September 19, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

      In many tropical countries, severe bryophyte harvest from montane ecosystems takes place during the Christmas season each year. Bryophyte species are sold in local markets as decorations for nativity scenes; this is an ancient Andean tradition that has now been adopted by people in cities and towns outside of the Andes. This commerce involving bryophytes has grown in such a way that it threatens natural ecosystems, such as páramos and cloud forests, as well as invertebrates and vascular plant seedlings that live amongst or germinate in bryophytes.

      An educational program, directed towards the local Andean communities, was designed to minimize the impact of the massive seasonal bryophyte extraction. This programme was based at the Universidad de Los Andes-Centro Jardín Botànico and involved extensive collaboration with the local government and communities. The educational effort was directed towards teachers from elementary and high schools, and people from public institutions and environmental groups. The programme focuses on the role of bryophytes in the local ecosystems, and their importance in water storage and soil protection. Conferences for both children and adults were designed to bring the information to a diverse range of people in the local communities. The conferences were accompanied by information brochures and a campaign in local newspapers, on radio and television. For the first time, governmental institutions and the Universidad de Los Andes work together towards bryophyte conservation in this important and fragile ecosystem.

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  • R. I. LEWIS SMITH
    2005 Volume 97 Pages 233-248
    Published: January 25, 2005
    Released: September 19, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

      Deception Island is one of the most volcanically active sites south of 60°S. Between 1967 and 1970 three major eruptions devastated large expanses of the landscape and its predominantly cryptogamic vegetation. Since 1970 extensive recolonisation has occurred on the more stable surfaces. Unheated ground supports several bryophyte and lichen communities typical of much of the maritime Antarctic, but geothermal habitats possess remarkable associations of bryophytes, many of the species being unknown or very rare elsewhere in the Antarctic. Nine geothermal sites were located and their vegetation investigated in detail. Communities associated with more transient sites have disappeared when the geothermal activity ceased. Mosses and liverworts occur to within a few centimetres of fumarole vents where temperatures reach 90-95℃, while temperatures within adjacent moss turf can reach 35-50℃ or more and remain consistently between 25 and 45℃. Most of the bryoflora has a Patagonian-Fuegian provenance and it is presumed that, unlike most species, the thermophiles are not pre-adapted to the Antarctic environment, being able to colonise only where the warm and humid conditions prevail.

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  • DAVID G. LONG
    2005 Volume 97 Pages 249-261
    Published: January 25, 2005
    Released: September 19, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

      A review and assessment are presented of the three existing classifications of species within the genus Asterella. Based on recent morphological and molecular studies additional characters such as spore colour and ornamentation are considered important in classification. A new subgeneric classification is presented, which groups the 48 provisionally accepted species into five subgenera, Asterella, Saccatae, Wallichianae, Phragmoblepharis and Graciles. Subgenus Asterella is divided into two sections, Asterella and Brachyblepharis, subg. Wallichianae into two sections, Wallichianae and Californicae, the latter described as a new section containing only A. californica. Subg. Phragmoblepharis cannot be satisfactorily divided into sections at present. A key is provided to the subgenera and sections along with descriptions and a list of accepted species in each.

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  • TERRY MCINTOSH, WYNNE MILES
    2005 Volume 97 Pages 263-269
    Published: January 25, 2005
    Released: September 19, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

      In Canada, Garry oak ecosystems have a restricted distribution in the southwest corner of British Columbia. Bryophyte biodiversity research in these heavily altered ecosystems has been sporadic, with most of the focus being on rare species. The paper reports on the author's initial study on a broad-based bryophyte survey for Garry oak communities, focusing in the early stages on rare or ‘interesting’ species. Ephemerum serratum is reported here new to western Canada.

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  • OSCAR ORREGO
    2005 Volume 97 Pages 271-280
    Published: January 25, 2005
    Released: September 19, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

      The main purpose of this study was to verify the value of ecological indexes and mathematical models to describe the structure of epiphytic bryophyte communities in disturbed forest patches. For this reason, I examined bryophyte diversity into four 0.1 ha plots located in forest patches in the coffee zone of Departamento del Quindío, Colombia. I made observations of abundance of 101 bryophyte species, mosses and liverworts, using percentage coverage as an abundance measure. Species coverage was estimated within each plot inside 40×40 cm quadrats placed on trunks and twigs of selected trees.

      To measure the heterogeneity and equitability of bryophyte communities I analyzed the abundance distribution within each plot, and its fitness to four mathematical models through the non-parametric chi-square test X2. Also an analysis of five ecological indexes was included. I deduced that one model did not show conclusive results about the conservation status of forest patches. Moreover, simply one index did not allow an appropriate evaluation of epiphyte bryophyte diversity. However, these several ecological and mathematical approximations permitted a suitable interpretation of results. Additionally, observations suggested a direct relationship between bryophyte diversity and structural heterogeneity of forest fragments.

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  • B. J. O'SHEA
    2005 Volume 97 Pages 281-285
    Published: January 25, 2005
    Released: September 19, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

      Tropical Africa has probably a lower level of bryological activity than elsewhere in the tropics. The principal reason is seen to be the lack of materials to assist bryophyte identification, and the resulting reluctance of people to get involved in this area. The solution is seen to be a generic flora of the area, local species-level floras and increased use of the internet to make information available.

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  • DAVIDS. RYCROFT
    2005 Volume 97 Pages 287-297
    Published: January 25, 2005
    Released: September 19, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

      Biosynthetic pathways that may lead to the diverse secondary metabolites occurring in liverwort oil bodies are considered in relation to the apparently disparate products that can be found in closely related taxa. Discussion centres on recent work with Plagiochila bifaria (Sw.) Lindenb., a broadly defined species where different chemotypes are characterized by either 9, 10-dihydrophenanthrenes, methyl orsellinates, or 9-arylnon-6-en-2-ones. A scenario is presented to illustrate the possibility that a biosynthetic theme common to all examples of the taxon studied could account for the phytochemical variations observed. A complementary study of members of Plagiochila sect. Rutilantes Carl illustrates that taxa maintained at specific rank may nevertheless contain several secondary metabolites in common.

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  • SCOTT W. SCHUETTE, RAYMOND E. STOTLER
    2005 Volume 97 Pages 299-308
    Published: January 25, 2005
    Released: September 19, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

      Five species of the simple thalloid liverwort Jensenia are confirmed to occur in Latin America, predominately in the Andean páramos. Jensenia spinosa, the most common species, is widely distributed from the West Indies to Central America and the higher elevations of northern South America while J. wallisii is found growing from the Guyana Highlands to Costa Rica. Jensenia difformis is known from Brazil, Tierra del Fuego and several subantarctic islands whereas J. crassifrons is known only from several subantarctic islands. Jensenia florschuetzii has the narrowest range and is restricted to the páramos above 3500 meters in Colombia and the province of Carchi in northern Equador.

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  • CECÍLIA SÉRGIO, DAVID DRAPER, CÉSAR GARCIA
    2005 Volume 97 Pages 309-316
    Published: January 25, 2005
    Released: September 19, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

      Cryptothallus mirabilis Malmb. exhibits a specialised ecology and is a non-photosynthetic liverwort. This species was first described for Scandinavia and till now was considered a north oceanic species. The discoveries of C. mirabilis in different localities in Portugal are the first reliable records of the species in southern Europe and represent an extension of its geographical range. In fact, in Portugal C. mirabilis does not seem to be rare in areas with oceanic influence, mainly in wet forestry habitats. It is possibly widespread in the Iberian Peninsula because it is easily overlooked owing to its subterranean growth. The objective of this work is to give new localities which contribute to an evaluation of its ecological requirements, to the definition of its biogeographical distribution in Portugal, and to present a predictive map for the Iberian Peninsula. The aim of the model is to identify the distribution pattern and also some potential places of occurrence in Spain and provide information about the environmental range of the species in order to improve actions for conservation.

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  • ANNE STREIFF
    2005 Volume 97 Pages 317-338
    Published: January 25, 2005
    Released: September 19, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

      This work investigates the phylogenetic relationships among species of Grimmia Hedw. using cladistic analyses based on morphological and anatomical characters. The genus Grimmia is taxonomically difficult, because of morphological homogeneity of both gametophyte and sporophyte, principally due to growth conditions. The forty Grimmia species used in this study represent the majority of those found in Europe and Asia. Ten taxa belonging to the Grimmiaceae and Grimmiales were included as outgroups. Fifty-two morphological and anatomical traits (33 gametophytic and 19 sporophytic) were identified. Based on these data, a maximum parsimony (mp) method was applied to construct a phylogeny of Grimmia. Eight hundred and nineteen mp-trees were found and although they had relatively low statistical support on the internal branches, the tree topology was stable. Based on the RC re-weighted consensus tree, Grimmia as currently defined was found to be paraphyletic. Three subclades corresponding to the subgenera Rhabdogrimmia Limpr., Litoneuron I. Hagen and Gasterogrimmia Schimp. were observed in the trees, while the remainder of the Grimmia species formed an unresolved group indistinct from the other Grimmiaceae.

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