The Journal of Japan Academy of Health Sciences
Online ISSN : 2433-3018
Print ISSN : 1880-0211
ISSN-L : 1880-0211
Volume 9 , Issue 1
Showing 1-23 articles out of 23 articles from the selected issue
  • Type: Cover
    2006 Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages Cover1-
    Published: June 25, 2006
    Released: October 27, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2006 Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages App1-
    Published: June 25, 2006
    Released: October 27, 2017
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  • Type: Index
    2006 Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages Toc1-
    Published: June 25, 2006
    Released: October 27, 2017
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  • Takako Tsutsui, Sadanori Higashino, Aya Taneda, Yuki Yajima, Masafumi ...
    Type: Article
    2006 Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 5-15
    Published: June 25, 2006
    Released: October 27, 2017
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    The purpose of this research was to clarify the structure of factors in the Zarit Caregiver Burden Interview (ZBI) evaluation index using data for family members providing long-term care to persons in the home, and to examine applications for this index in Japan. The subjects were 1,143 individuals who as of April 1, 2002, were acting as the main caregivers for any of the 5,189 seniors living in Otsu City, Shiga Prefecture, certified as "Type 1 Insured Parties" after having received certification of eligibility for long-term care. All of the subjects agreed in advance to participate in this study. We analyzed data using an explanatory factor analysis (EFA) and a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to study the structural validity of the ZBI evaluation index. Based on the results of the analysis, we identified three factors: "Personal restrictions", "Emotional strain", and "Caregiving responsibility". Furthermore, based on the results of the confirmatory factor analysis, we formed a secondary factor model and a diagonal model that assume the inclusion of these factors. A primary factor model could not be established, however, because of indexes for goodness of fit of the data. Based on the results of a confirmatory factor analysis, we verified the validity of a diagonal model that includes the three factors in question. Because the primary factor model could not be established, we believe that further studies of the three factors indicated are still required. However, it is highly significant that in the case of the ZBI, a care burden index for family members providing care to seniors with dementia, the factor structure has already been verified, making it possible to identify the cause-and-effect relationships involved in feelings of care burden among family caregivers and the seniors with dementia for whom care is being provided.
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  • Yifei Tang, Yuki Yajima, Masafumi Kirino, Kazuo Nakajima
    Type: Article
    2006 Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 16-23
    Published: June 25, 2006
    Released: October 27, 2017
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    The purpose of the study was to examine characteristics of the occurrence of maltreatment by fathers and mothers of children in an urban area of China. A self-report questionnaire survey was conducted to 493 couples that had had a child using the four nursery centers in C city, J prefecture. Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare mean scores on the inventory for measuring child maltreatment (Tang; 2005) between mothers and fathers. Results showed mothers were more likely to report physical and psychological abuse than fathers. For mothers, mean differences by child's sex and age buckets on any maltreatment scores were not found. Fathers with a son were more likely to report physical and psychological abuse than fathers with a daughter. For fathers, mean differences by child's age buckets on any maltreatment scores were not found. Fathers were more likely to report physical and psychological abuse toward male children than female children. Mean differences by children's age buckets between mothers and fathers on any maltreatment scores were not found. These findings suggest that support systems considering the differences in parent's and child's sex are required in order to reduce and prevent maltreatment toward children by parents.
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  • Mitsuhiro Ookura, Ryouichi Yoshida, Iwao Yamamoto, Takayuki Fujiwara, ...
    Type: Article
    2006 Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 24-29
    Published: June 25, 2006
    Released: October 27, 2017
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    It is known that the oxygen density in the air affects the physical training as an environmental load, in addition to the exercise load. To study applicability of high・low oxygen density environment to the therapeutic exercise, its effect on respiratory・circulatory system in the four different degrees of oxygen density under normal air pressure, i.e. 30.0% (high oxygen density environment), 20.9% (normal oxygen density environment), 16.4% (medium low oxygen density environment), 14.5% (very low oxygen density environment), were examined by focusing on VE・SpO_2・HR. It was confirmed that SpO_2, both at rest and exercise, affected by oxygen pressure, decreased in accordance with the decrease of oxygen density. Also, a trend was confirmed that VE and HR, both at rest and exercise, increased in accordance with the decrease of oxygen density. They are considered to be acute adaptation to retrieve oxygen supply reduced by the decrease of oxygen partial pressure. By this acute adaptation, given the same level of physiological load as that in normal oxygen density environment, it is possible to do exercise in greater physical strength in high oxygen density environment. Also, in low oxygen density environment it is possible to give the same level of stress to respiratory・circulatory system in less physical strength than that in normal oxygen density environment. Therefore, to maintain and improve the patient's general endurance in the therapeutic exercise, it is suggested that adding the environmental load of oxygen density to exercise load, enables us to make more suitable exercise load plan for each patient, which makes the therapeutic exercise more effective.
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  • Hiroko Kunikata, Shiho Toyota, Yuki Yajima, Kenji Numoto, Kazuo Nakaji ...
    Type: Article
    2006 Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 30-37
    Published: June 25, 2006
    Released: October 27, 2017
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    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between psychiatric state and self-esteem of schizophrenic patients living in the community. Analysis was done with 109 schizophrenic patients in a longitudinal study and 61 schizophrenic patients in a cross-sectional study. A nine-item version of the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) with its reliability and validity endorsed was used. In the cross-sectional study, a "lethargy" factor was negatively correlated with self-esteem, while in the longitudinal study psychiatric symptom measured with the nine-item version of the BPRS were negatively correlated with self-esteem. Therefore, this result showed that psychiatric symptom might negatively affect self-esteem. The findings suggest that support for lethargic schizophrenic patients may lead to enhancement of their self-esteem.
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  • Kaoru Inoue, Keisuke Suzuki, Yuko Ito, Yumi Ikeda, Hitoshi Takei, Osam ...
    Type: Article
    2006 Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 38-43
    Published: June 25, 2006
    Released: October 27, 2017
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    We developed the instructional video to show how a trained occupational therapist would initially assess a client. Our present study showed the assessment video was useful for learning of occupational therapy students. In the next phase, the purposes of the present study were: 1) to confirm the usefulness of the assessment video from the viewpoints of Occupational therapists who did not participate in the development of the video; and 2) to identify potential improvements that could be made in the tape, or its usage as a teaching tool in the future. The subjects were 12 occupational therapists, who did not participate in development of the video. They heard about the object of this project, consented to watch the assessment video and respond to a questionnaire. Each subject was asked to complete the questionnaire immediately after watching the assessment video. The results showed that the video was appreciated by 12 occupational therapists who watched the video tape, so we considered that the effectiveness of this assessment video was confirmed objectively by this investigation. Occupational therapy students could to learn how to practice the first evaluation for the client. However, on the occasion of practical use in a lecture, we considered that we gave students enough information to prevent their misunderstanding. We considered that the use of the assessment video for self-study needed more consideration. The video could have the possibility for Problem-based learning; PBL.
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  • Hiromitsu Daisaki, Kazuya Sakaguchi, Hiroyuki Shinohara, Takeyuki Hash ...
    Type: Article
    2006 Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 44-58
    Published: June 25, 2006
    Released: October 27, 2017
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    We implemented Fourier transform using Microsoft Excel. The program which we developed uses values of given one-dimensional functions (or numerical data) at 8 points as one period, and computes discrete Fourier transform. The program also computes two-dimensional Fourier transform for image data with 8×8 matrix. For the one-dimensional data, this program can treat the number of data easily up to 32 points and for the two-dimensional data, up to 32×32 matrix. According to the definition formula of Fourier transform, the program calculates the phase factor with complex exponential function or with the real and the imaginary number part using Euler formula. To use a program, it doesn't need detailed knowledge about Excel. User can calculate discrete Fourier transform with this program in the sense of tool kits of a paper and a pencil and can realize the properties of Fourier transform (linearity, shifting theorem, modulation, conjugate symmetry, scaling property, Parseval's formula, derivative property, convolution theorem) efficiently. The program facilitates the understanding of the mathematical basis and the actual arithmetic of the Fourier transform and is useful for the research and education in the field of medical imaging.
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  • Wataru Ogawa, Giichirou Nakaya, Mituya Suenaga, Masumi Ichikawa
    Type: Article
    2006 Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 59-66
    Published: June 25, 2006
    Released: October 27, 2017
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    The noise spectra of the Imaging plate used to CR apparatus (CR400, Kodak) and those of films were measured using the Wiener spectra formura. The relationship between the radiation dose and the Wiener spectrum was measured at 3 dose levels above and below the standard dose that provided a density of 1.0 on the screen film system. The characteristics of the noise of the CR apparatus were evaluated using a C-D diagram produced with a Burger phantom. At dose levels below the standard dose, the discrimination ability decreased with the dose level, and the discrimination ability remained unchanged at dose levels higher than twice the standard dose. Since the Wiener spectrum value is proportional to the power of dose, the decrease in the Wiener spectrum value with an increase in the dose level is small, while the increase in the Wiener spectrum value with a decrease in the dose level is large, suggesting that the difference was due to the granularity.
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  • Type: Appendix
    2006 Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 67-68
    Published: June 25, 2006
    Released: October 27, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2006 Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 69-
    Published: June 25, 2006
    Released: October 27, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2006 Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 70-71
    Published: June 25, 2006
    Released: October 27, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2006 Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 72-73
    Published: June 25, 2006
    Released: October 27, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2006 Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 73-
    Published: June 25, 2006
    Released: October 27, 2017
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    Download PDF (102K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2006 Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 73-
    Published: June 25, 2006
    Released: October 27, 2017
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    Download PDF (102K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2006 Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 74-
    Published: June 25, 2006
    Released: October 27, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2006 Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages App2-
    Published: June 25, 2006
    Released: October 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (51K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2006 Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages App3-
    Published: June 25, 2006
    Released: October 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (51K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2006 Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages App4-
    Published: June 25, 2006
    Released: October 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (51K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2006 Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages App5-
    Published: June 25, 2006
    Released: October 27, 2017
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    Download PDF (66K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2006 Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages App6-
    Published: June 25, 2006
    Released: October 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (25K)
  • Type: Cover
    2006 Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages Cover2-
    Published: June 25, 2006
    Released: October 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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