The Japanese Journal of Clinical Research on Death and Dying
Online ISSN : 2434-9089
Print ISSN : 0912-4292
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Showing 1-6 articles out of 6 articles from the selected issue
  • Parent’s cognition, emotion and changed relationship with their child post crime victimization of the child’s sibling.
    Chizuru Akata, Yukihiro Sakaguchi
    2020 Volume 43 Issue 1 Pages 165-172
    Published: 2020
    Released: June 22, 2021
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    The aim of this study is to examine how the children’s death by crime affects parent-child’s sibling relationship. The subjects of this study were 4 families (7 parents/7 siblings) of the deceased killed by crime victimization. We conducted a semi-structured interview for all family members individually. As the characteristics of the parent’s cognition and emotion for bereaved siblings, the study extracted 3 categories and 6 sub-categories, “unnoticed bereaved sibling” “suicide feeling” and “untellable truth”. It was clarified that the child’s siblings were suffering from the complicated relationship change with their parents since the day before the incident/accident in addition to loss of their siblings. On the support for bereaved siblings, consideration of the complicated parent-child’s sibling relationship is crucial.

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  • Sachiko Shimizu, Miyabi Uda, Megumi Kishino, Eiko Maetaki
    2020 Volume 43 Issue 1 Pages 173-184
    Published: 2020
    Released: June 22, 2021
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    Purpose: This study intended to clarify the nursing students’ anxiety in taking care of end-of-life patients and factors for relieving anxiety.

    Methods: We conducted semi-structured interviews. Questions: 1)Anxiety before training,2)Anxiety during training,3)Factors and support that helped relieve anxiety. Interviews were recorded and analyzed using Krippendorff ’s method.

    Results: Twenty-eight nursing students participated in the study. Anxiety before the training was divided into 10 categories; “Concern about inconvenience to patients and their families” “How to relate to patients and their families” “Patient mortality” etc. Anxiety during training was divided also into 10 categories; “Concern about bothered to patients and their families” “Patient mortality” etc. Factors that helped to relieve anxiety were the following: “Courteous guidance” “Easy to consult system” “Easy atmosphere for consultation” etc.

    Conclusion: Students have many kinds of anxieties both before and during training. It will be necessary to investigate concrete support for relieving anxiety such as collaboration between teachers and nurses, and emotional support.

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  • Mika Hashimoto
    2020 Volume 43 Issue 1 Pages 185-192
    Published: 2020
    Released: June 22, 2021
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    The aim of the research is to clarify the experience of the bereaved families of end-of-life care for nursing at the special nursing home. After conducting a semi-structured interview survey with the bereaved family of six cases of care, we performed a qualitative analysis. Six Categories that characterized bereaved families’ experience with older adults living and dying in nursing homes were identified: (1)preparing the place they lived to be the place of death, (2)Anxiety due to poorly explained end-of-life care processes, (3) Relief from family support of experts, (4) Appreciation for the dedication of end-of-life care staff, (5)Satisfaction with choosing a nursing home as a place for end-of-life care, (6)acceptance of natural death.

    This suggested the necessity to improve communication skills with informed consent so that there is no anxiety for bereaved families.

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  • Yumiko Takedomi, Yasuko Tabuchi, Yuki Kumagai, Maiko Sakamoto, Sumiko ...
    2020 Volume 43 Issue 1 Pages 193-198
    Published: 2020
    Released: June 22, 2021
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    This study aimed to evaluate factors related to the Posttraumatic Growth (PTG) of bereaved families of cancer patients who received home palliative care. 94 family members participated in this study, and their bereavement durations were from 6 months to 6 years. We sent the families self-administered questionnaires and 82 were returned. The PTG total scores of home palliative care were significantly correlated with the Good Death Inventory (GDI) total scores (r=0.22), 4 subscales of the GDI (r=0.22 to 0.34), problem-focused coping (r=0.53), emotion-focused coping (r=0.43), and emotional support (r=0.32), and a role of the deceased(r=0.31). This study suggests that it is important for bereaved families with home palliative care to think about good death at early stage with their loved ones and incorporate the ideas into their care. It is necessary to evaluate the coping of the family, social support and the role of the deceased, and build a system to support their grief.

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  • tomoko Yomoda, miho Tsunematsu, shun Tomita
    2020 Volume 43 Issue 1 Pages 199-203
    Published: 2020
    Released: June 22, 2021
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    The purpose of this study is to clarify doctors' difficulty and what is required for nurses associated with delivering bad news to patients.

    A study was conducted for 24 doctors of Hospital A based on semi-structured interview. As a result, four categories, "enhance understanding of medical condition by patients and family", "confront one's own heartache", "face with patients and family to make decision" and "understand individuality of patients", have been extracted as difficulties for doctors associated with delivery of bad news regarding medical condition and treatment of cancers. On the other hand, five categories, "To share thoughts and appearance of patients", "To listen to true intention of patients", "To mentally support patients and their families", "To be a person familiar with patients" and "To observe patients behavior", have been extracted as what is required for nurses. From the discussion, it has been suggested that doctors and nurses were unsuccessful in supporting decision-making as a team in spite of demand of such support to them. Participation in Advance Care Planning training will help doctors and nurses as a team to support decision-making smoothly.

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  • Arisa Matsuura, Mizue Shiromaru, Migiwa Nakada
    2020 Volume 43 Issue 1 Pages 204-209
    Published: 2020
    Released: June 22, 2021
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    【Purpose】 To identify anticipatory grief and effect factor of nurses who care for terminal cancer patients in a palliative care unit.

    【Methods】 The study was conducted using a qualitative and inductive approach. Interview data were transcribed verbatim and summarized, and they were classified into categories.

    【Results】 The following categories were extracted: 3 categories concerning anticipatory grief and 3 categories as influencing factors. As anticipatory grief, [sorrow and pain that change with time] , [Sorrow and pain shared with a family] , and [an image of a patient in their minds] were identified. As factors influencing anticipatory grief, [the loss of physical functioning that results in death], [pain that is not relieved as expected by a nurse], and [established relationships] were identified.

    【Discussion】 The results revealed that the nurses experienced anticipatory grief in clinical settings by being influenced by the changes in patients’ physical functioning that can cause death and unfavorable situations regarding pain management. Also, [An image of a patient in their minds] was extracted as anticipatory grief experienced by the nurses in private settings, indicating that nurse-patient relationships had an impact on the private lives of the nurses.

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