Japanese Journal of Biofeedback Research
Online ISSN : 2432-3888
Print ISSN : 0386-1856
Volume 31
Showing 1-5 articles out of 5 articles from the selected issue
  • Yoshio Inamori
    Type: Article
    2005 Volume 31 Pages i-ii
    Published: September 30, 2005
    Released: May 23, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Kunio Yasue
    Type: Article
    2005 Volume 31 Pages 1-17
    Published: September 30, 2005
    Released: May 23, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    An introductory exposition of Quantum Brain Dynamics (QBD) is presented in which the fundamental physical process of the brain can be described within the realm of quantum field theory. QBD is nothing else but Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) of the electric dipole field of dipolar solitons and water molecules with a symmetry property under the dipole rotation. The highly systematized functioning of the brain is found to be realized by the spontaneous symmetry breaking phenomena. Memory printing, recall and decay processes are represented by the fundamental physical processes standing for the phase transition process, the symmetry restoring process and the quantum tunneling process, respectively.
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  • Chiaki Nishimura, Aki Nagase, Kazuko Terada, Li Qun Wang
    Type: Article
    2005 Volume 31 Pages 19-26
    Published: September 30, 2005
    Released: May 23, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Performance of biofeedback is improved when an appropriate imagery is applied in the training process. In this paper, neural correlates of imagery were studied by measuring neurophysiological activities in imagery related to autobiographical memory, a memory for events and issues closely related to oneself. We measured changes in relative regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) using fMRI. Each subject was requested to read a brief sentence in which an episode in his/her own past or that of other person was described, then to silently make an image of the situation in his/her mind. The block-designed fMRI measurement was performed. In Experiment I, rCBF during autobiographical and nonautobiographical memory retrieval was compared in three conditions. In Experiment II, the contents of the episodes were subdivided into four conditions depend on emotional tone (positive/negative) and temporal remoteness (recent/remote). The results of the Experiment I show that the activated regions in autobiographical memory retrieval was almost the same as those in nonautobiograpghical memory retrieval, but area was larger in autobiographical memory retrieval. And relative rCBF specifically increased in the frontal association area. The results of the Experiment II show that, except visual and prefrontal cortices, activated regions were different when the subjects retrieved the memories with differential emotional tone and temporal remoteness. In comparing areas in the four conditions, they were arranged as follows : negative-recent < positive-recent < negative-remote < positive-remote. Those results suggest the advantage of autobiographical memory as a resource of imagery in biofeedback training because of its stability and its effect on neural activation in the prefrontal cortex. They also give a clue in selecting the kind of imagery in biofeedback training based on the autobiographical memory in terms of emotional tone and temporal remoteness.
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  • Yasufumi Aoyama, Yumiko Inoue, Wataru Hashimoto, Mieko Ohsuga
    Type: Article
    2005 Volume 31 Pages 27-34
    Published: September 30, 2005
    Released: May 23, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This paper describes a new concept virtual reality system named "The Mind Wave" which provides a healing or relaxation method mediated by respiration. It gives a feeling as if the user is surfing gently on the sea waves by 3D moving images, sounds, a breeze and the movement of a chair. All devices are controlled by respiration of the user. He/she can feel his/her own breath by visual, auditory and sensory inputs and a deep, slow breathing is expected to be induced without consciousness. Twelve healthy young adults participated in an experiment to assess the effectiveness of the developed system compared to the respiration control with an instruction. It was shown that the system can induce the aimed respiration but it requires some effort. The relaxation effects were confirmed not only by subjective ratings but also physiological measures such as heart rate, heart rate variability and EEG alpha component.
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2005 Volume 31 Pages 44-
    Published: September 30, 2005
    Released: May 23, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (326K)
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