The Japanese Journal of Ergonomics
Online ISSN : 1884-2844
Print ISSN : 0549-4974
ISSN-L : 0549-4974
Volume 55 , Issue 4
Showing 1-4 articles out of 4 articles from the selected issue
Research paper
  • Takeru OGAWA, Ping Yeap LOH, Kousei INOKUCHI, Yasunari NOGUCHI, Kenich ...
    2019 Volume 55 Issue 4 Pages 119-125
    Published: August 15, 2019
    Released: September 24, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    House flooring materials may be one of the main causes lead to the high fall incidents among the elderly. The main objective of this study is to investigate the effects of different flooring materials on the walking motion of the elderly. 18 men (age, 70.8±3.2 years) without any walking impediments were recruited. The experiment conditions are common Japanese house flooring materials, namely wood, carpet and tatami. The participants walked on the flooring materials in randomized order and the walking motion was recorded by a three-dimensional motion analysis system. The stride length was significantly longer for tatami compared to that for wood. Foot clearance was significantly larger for carpet and tatami than that for wood. Subsequently, the initial contact hip joint and foot sole angles were significantly larger for tatami compared to that for wood and carpet. Additionally, range of hip joint, knee joint and foot sole angles were significantly larger for carpet and tatami than that for wood. The results suggest tatami may reduce the abnormal short stepped and shuffling gait often found among the elderly.

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  • Hiromi IMAI, Tamiyo ASAGA, Kyohei MATSUI, Tetsuo MISAWA
    2019 Volume 55 Issue 4 Pages 126-132
    Published: August 15, 2019
    Released: September 24, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    In this study, we examined the validity of our developed tooth brushing practice (TBP) module to promote the self-learning of brushing techniques at schools. The subjects were 12 nursing students who had completed oral care training. In the experiments, residual plaque (PCR score), time required for brushing, and frequency of excessive brushing pressure were compared with TBP module and simulators commonly used in dental hygienist schools. The subjective evaluation of usability of the simulators was measured using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). As a result, the PCR scores and frequencies of excessive brushing pressure were significantly lower with TBP module. The usability demonstrated significantly higher self-learning effects with TBP module. Thus, TBP module showed the same learning effects as the existing products and excellent portability, suggesting its usefulness as a teaching material for self-learning.

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  • Fumiko FURUKAWA, Kiyohito TERADA, Yuji SAKURA
    2019 Volume 55 Issue 4 Pages 133-144
    Published: August 15, 2019
    Released: September 24, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    This study aimed to identify the motion sequences and time-flow of roll-overs during sleep in women to develop a self-helped roll-over maneuver for elderly patients. Shifts from deeper sleep stages to lighter stages leading to arousal occur at roll-over-onset. Quick re-falling-asleep after completion may aid peaceful sleep continuation. Motion sequences of six women aged 43-65 years were examined at a sleep laboratory using polysomnography and infrared video. Relationships among phase I (before roll-over onset), II (roll-over movements), and III (roll-over end to re-falling-asleep onset) were determined. Mean total sleep time was 6.72±0.77 h, with over 80% sleep efficiency. Among 12 patterns examined, only supine-to-left and supine-to-right lateral roll-overs were classified: type A, sliding waist with pause (n=11, sleep); B, sliding waist without pause (n=56, sleep and arousal); and C, without sliding waist or pause (n=1, arousal). Time spent in phase I and III in type A were correlated (r=0.78, p=0.005), and were the shortest among the types. Discriminant analysis for type A (n=11) and B (n=20, sleep) showed 80.6% correct classification. In conclusion, type A roll-overs, involving efficient motion with quick re-falling-asleep, may be a useful foundation to develop self-helped roll-over maneuvers.

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  • Yuki MIYAZAKI, Ryuichi KAMIYAMA, Daisuke MIYAKE, Jun-ichiro KAWAHARA
    2019 Volume 55 Issue 4 Pages 145-154
    Published: August 15, 2019
    Released: September 24, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the ease of pulling wet wipes on product impression and selection. Study participants were asked to use high-pulling-property and low-pulling-property wet-wipe products for cleaning. After each cleaning, the participants evaluated the perceived pulling property, perceived wiping property, fun of using etc. of each product. The participants also expressed which product they would like to use if they were to perform the same cleaning again. Results showed that the high-pulling-property product was evaluated higher than the low-pulling-property product for both perceived pulling property and fun of use. Furthermore, most participants preferred using the high-pulling-property product in a hypothetical situation where they would perform the same cleaning again. Interestingly, the participants who believed that the high-pulling-property product was easier to pull than the low-pulling-property product reported that the high-pulling-property gave a smoother wiping experience. We assumed that these findings were derived from the attribution of increasing haptic perceptual fluency (i.e., the increasing pulling property of the wet wipes) to product impressions.

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