Taiikugaku kenkyu (Japan Journal of Physical Education, Health and Sport Sciences)
Online ISSN : 1881-7718
Print ISSN : 0484-6710
ISSN-L : 0484-6710
Volume 31 , Issue 4
Showing 1-15 articles out of 15 articles from the selected issue
  • Type: Cover
    1987 Volume 31 Issue 4 Pages Cover13-
    Published: March 01, 1987
    Released: September 27, 2017
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  • Type: Cover
    1987 Volume 31 Issue 4 Pages Cover14-
    Published: March 01, 1987
    Released: September 27, 2017
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    Download PDF (22K)
  • Type: Appendix
    1987 Volume 31 Issue 4 Pages App5-
    Published: March 01, 1987
    Released: September 27, 2017
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  • Arnold W. Flath
    Type: Article
    1987 Volume 31 Issue 4 Pages 257-262
    Published: March 01, 1987
    Released: September 27, 2017
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  • Toyohiko Ito
    Type: Article
    1987 Volume 31 Issue 4 Pages 263-271
    Published: March 01, 1987
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The purpose of this study was to examine the validity of causal attribution model about Sport behavior of university students. This model assumes the caudal process as follows: (1)attributional style influences degree of perceived physical competence each student has ; (2) the degree of perceived physical competence influences magnitude of sport behavior he/she takes. First, two questionaires designed to measure attributional style in sport situations and physical competence were developed and administered to 129 university students. By factor analysis, 7 and 2 factors were interpreted in each questionaire, and the 7 and 2 scales of these factors were set. These scales were named as follows : "positive, negative-task", "positive, negative-mood", "positive-ability", "positive, negative-1uck", "negative-ability", "positive-effort", "negative-effort", "perceived physical ability"; and "perceived control". The reliability of these scales were tested by the coefficientαand the coefficient of test-retest reliability, and credible results were obtained. Then, according to the model, a path analysis was applied to the data obtained in two questionaires and the two indexes of sport behavior. The validity of the model was mainly confirmed. It was found that the scale of positive-ability, negative-ability, and perceived physical ability play the central role in mediating sport behavior. It was also found that different causal paths were showed in two indexes of sport behavior. They were discussed in terms of the differences of achievement goal in each sport behavior.
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  • Sadao Harada, Tsutomu Araki, Akira Tsujino
    Type: Article
    1987 Volume 31 Issue 4 Pages 273-284
    Published: March 01, 1987
    Released: September 27, 2017
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    The voluntary regulation of amount of exercise by teachers must be of great importance for the betterment of physical activity classes. The present study, therefore, was designed to obtain rational materials for establishing the method how to voluntarily regulate the amount of exercise and activity in physical education classes. The Subjective Intensity of Teachers Presumed (SIP), obtained from teachers with more than 5years experience and Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) of 5th and 6th grade boys were used in this study. Significant high correlation coefficients were found between the SIP and the RPE, and these relationships did not reflect individual difference among boys and teachers. The RPE of each boy well reflected the objective intensity of activity, particularly when ranked by their relative intensity evaluation. The satisfactory classes conducted for boys were to ; (a) allocate at least 12 minute for the main learning item with RPE of "not-light, but not-severe" ranking-level. It was found that, using the SIP based on the RPE of boys, teachers were able to regulate the amount of exercise at their satisfactory level in physical activity classes. The above-described results suggest that SIP of teachers may be applied to better the classes by their expert and voluntary regulation of the amount of physical activity classes.
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  • Kudo Koki
    Type: Article
    1987 Volume 31 Issue 4 Pages 285-292
    Published: March 01, 1987
    Released: September 27, 2017
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    Former studies referring to constant error (CE) in coincident timing task have indicated that the tendency toward timing delay increases in proportion to the increase in the magnitude of motor response. In this study, two experiments were conducted to reexamine this tendency in the batting skill. In concrete terms, effects of bat weight, swing amplitude and swing speed on CE in the timing of batting skill were analyzed. All these factors were assumed to affect the magnitude of motor response in this task. In experiment 1, effects of bat weight and swing amplitude on the timing errors were analyzed when the maximum swing speed was required. Contrary to the hypothesis, these factors produced no significant effect on CE. However, bat weight and swing amplitude affected absolute error (AE),and the latter also affected variable error (VE) significantly. Results of AE and VE meant that the timing accuracy increased as the bat weight and/or swing amplitude decreased. In experiment 2, effect of swing speed was examined when the conditions of bat weight and swing amplitude were held constant. The results indicated that the timing errors were produced premature timing responses, and this result was opposed to the hypothesis. In AE and VE, timing accuracy increased as the swing speed increased. Results of CE in two experiments in this study did not support the hypothesis which was brought forth by former studies, and were discussed in terms of differences of task characteristics. Results of AE and VE concerning the effects of swing amplitude and speed on timing accuracy tended to support the impulse-variability model proposed by R.A. Schmidt et al. (1979), but inconsistent results were also obtained in the effect of bat weight on AE.
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  • Teruo Nomura, Yoshiyuki Matsuura
    Type: Article
    1987 Volume 31 Issue 4 Pages 293-303
    Published: March 01, 1987
    Released: September 27, 2017
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    This study was intended to analyze the relative rate of contribution of physical structure and motor ability sub-domains contributing to swimming performance of competitive college male swimmers. Subjects were 75 highly trained college male swimmers. Fourty-three variables were selected according to hypothetical structure of physical condition for swimming performance. Factor analysis applied to the 43×43 correlation matrix has yielded 12 sub-domains of physical condition. Multiple regression analysis was then applied to swimming performance score and scores for various sub-domains to determine the relative degree of contribution of each physical condition sub-domain to the swimming performance. The results were as follows : 1. The physical condition sub-domains for top college male swimmers were represented by the following 12 factors : 1) body bulk, 2) fundamental swimming ability, 3) leg strength; 4) posture, 5) ankle flexibility, 6) arm strength, 7) body linearity, 8) endurance, 9) general flexibility, 10) trunk flexion, 11) agility and 12) coordination. 2. The best swimming record in 1982 for each subject was then standardized with the mean and standard deviation computed from official records of 1980-1982 Intercollegiate Swimming Championship Meets. These values were considered appropriate as the measure of individual's swimming performance since coefficients of variation for various swimming events and their relative speeds to the respective world record remained essentially constant. 3. Analysis of the data indicated that 4 sub-domains of physical condition, i.e., fundamental swimming ability (35.0%), coordination (26.5%),leg strength (15.9%), and posture (10.6%) had markedly higher relative rate of contribution to swimming performance. From these results, it is suggested that fundamental swimming ability (e.g., strokes in 25m swimming) and coordination (e.g., rhythm and timing control) are of great importance in producing highly trained college male swimmers. Training for muscle strength particularly on legs is also emphasized. Specific training for improving abilities in these sub-domains is recommended to add to the regular training. It should be noted that some of excellent swimmers were characterized by straightened spine curvature.
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  • Type: Appendix
    1987 Volume 31 Issue 4 Pages 305-346
    Published: March 01, 1987
    Released: September 27, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    1987 Volume 31 Issue 4 Pages 347-354
    Published: March 01, 1987
    Released: September 27, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    1987 Volume 31 Issue 4 Pages 355-369
    Published: March 01, 1987
    Released: September 27, 2017
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  • Type: Index
    1987 Volume 31 Issue 4 Pages Toc1-
    Published: March 01, 1987
    Released: September 27, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    1987 Volume 31 Issue 4 Pages App6-
    Published: March 01, 1987
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (34K)
  • Type: Cover
    1987 Volume 31 Issue 4 Pages Cover15-
    Published: March 01, 1987
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (19K)
  • Type: Cover
    1987 Volume 31 Issue 4 Pages Cover16-
    Published: March 01, 1987
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (19K)
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