Taiikugaku kenkyu (Japan Journal of Physical Education, Health and Sport Sciences)
Online ISSN : 1881-7718
Print ISSN : 0484-6710
ISSN-L : 0484-6710
Volume 46 , Issue 4
Showing 1-14 articles out of 14 articles from the selected issue
  • Type: Cover
    2001 Volume 46 Issue 4 Pages Cover13-
    Published: July 10, 2001
    Released: September 27, 2017
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  • Type: Cover
    2001 Volume 46 Issue 4 Pages Cover14-
    Published: July 10, 2001
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (30K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2001 Volume 46 Issue 4 Pages App5-
    Published: July 10, 2001
    Released: September 27, 2017
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  • Keiko Itani
    Type: Article
    2001 Volume 46 Issue 4 Pages 323-336
    Published: July 10, 2001
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Since the 1980's, many fitness education programs have been developed in schools in the USA. adopting new rationales and contents. The present study was conducted to highlight these changes and the adoption of these rationales. The procedure of the investigation was: 1. To study the development of a number of fitness education programs including "Physical Best," developed by AAHPERD, and "Fitness for Life," developed by Corbin and Lindsey (1997). 2. To review statements concerning the basic rationale of the new programs. 3. To consider comprehensively the shift in content of the new programs. The results obtained were as follows: 1. The objectives of the programs showed a change of focus from short-term improvement of fitness to development of ability and aptitude toward life-long physical activity. 2. The focus of the programs changed from skill-related fitness to health-related fitness. 3. There was a shift in fitness outcome (product) towards regular physical activity (process). 4. The content of the programs now emphasizes knowledge and self-management skills for life-long physical activity, and individualized exercise to develop a positive attitude towards physical activity. 5. The programs give importance to the development of sport skills, and affective and social dimensions, which are supportive for life-long physical activity.
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  • Takeshi Sugiura
    Type: Article
    2001 Volume 46 Issue 4 Pages 337-351
    Published: July 10, 2001
    Released: September 27, 2017
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    A study was conducted to investigate the process of personality change in athletes based on the model of athlete mental maturity proposed by Sugiura (1996). A scale for measuring mental maturity as an athlete (MMAA) was constructed, and 480 college athletes were investigated for the relationship between their experience of crisis and their MMAA score. The results revealed that MMAA had five factors: "clear meaning of sports activity", "self understanding", "independent achievement orientation", "mental stability", and "physiological controllability". The first three factors were positively related to exercise motivation and the will to continue sports activity, and were also improved by experience of crisis if the athletes changed their way of thinking. The other two factors were negatively related to competitive anxiety, and were not improved by experience of crisis. These results suggest that athletes improve their motivational aspect through experience of crisis, but do not improve their competitive anxiety. In the future, it will be necessary to clarify the factors that can change the "mental stability" and "physiological controllability" of athletes.
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  • Eiji Watanabe, Nobuo Takeshima, Makoto Chogahara, Tadaki Yamada, Kimih ...
    Type: Article
    2001 Volume 46 Issue 4 Pages 353-364
    Published: July 10, 2001
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This study examined the effects of water-based execise on psychological well-being and physical fitness in older adults, employing both quantitative and qualitative analysis. Forty (males = 12; females = 28) sedentary older adults were randomly assigned to either a water-based exercise group (n = 20) or a waiting control group (n = 20). Water-based exercise intervention lasted for a 12-week period. Every subject participated in three supervised sessions per week. During each session, subjects in the water-based exercise group performed 70 min of an execise program consisting of 10 min of warming-up, 20 min of brisk walking, 20 min of rhythmic dancing, 10 min of resistance training, and 10 min of cooling down exercise. Before and after the intervention, each participant's aerobic fitness, muscular strength, psychological mood states, and anxiety were quantitatively assessed. In order to help interpret and explain the quantitative findings, subjects in the exercise group were interviewed about the effectiveness of water exercise after completion of the exercise program. Quantitative results indicated that there was significant Group X Time interaction for aerobic fitness, muscular strength, psychological mood states, and anxiety. Qualitative analysis revealed that, subjects perceived positive changes in a wide range of significant life areas, and that the perceived improvement was closely related to the quantitative results. For example, many subjects felt that it was easier to perform their daily tasks such as climbing stairs, waking, and carrying baggage than before participating in the exercise. It is concluded that this water-based exercise program is significantly effective for quantitative and qualitative improvement of both psychological well-being and physical fitness.
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  • Toyohiko Ito
    Type: Article
    2001 Volume 46 Issue 4 Pages 365-379
    Published: July 10, 2001
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A study was conducted to explore the development of Physical Education learning motives of elementary school children, to classify these motives, and investigate how they are related to learning strategies. A questionnaire designed to assess learning motives and the use of learning strategies in Physical Education learning was administered to 660 5th and 6th graders, and the following results were obtained. Factor analysis revealed 6 factors related to learning motives for Physical Education learning : practice, superiority, approval, fulfillment, group, and performance orientations. The practice and fulfillment orientation scales of the learning motives correlated positively with children's learning strategies, and the superiority and performance orientations scales showed a negative correlation. Moreover, cluster analysis showed that children could be classified into 8 types of learning motives: amotivation, relation dependence, evaluation anxiety, regular, performance-oriented, ego-oriented, task-oriented, and intrinsic-oriented. On the basis of these results, we discuss how to motivate children for Physical Education learning.
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  • Type: Appendix
    2001 Volume 46 Issue 4 Pages 381-403
    Published: July 10, 2001
    Released: September 27, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2001 Volume 46 Issue 4 Pages 404-
    Published: July 10, 2001
    Released: September 27, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2001 Volume 46 Issue 4 Pages 405-411
    Published: July 10, 2001
    Released: September 27, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2001 Volume 46 Issue 4 Pages 412-415
    Published: July 10, 2001
    Released: September 27, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2001 Volume 46 Issue 4 Pages 419-
    Published: July 10, 2001
    Released: September 27, 2017
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  • Type: Cover
    2001 Volume 46 Issue 4 Pages Cover15-
    Published: July 10, 2001
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (26K)
  • Type: Cover
    2001 Volume 46 Issue 4 Pages Cover16-
    Published: July 10, 2001
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (26K)
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