Taiikugaku kenkyu (Japan Journal of Physical Education, Health and Sport Sciences)
Online ISSN : 1881-7718
Print ISSN : 0484-6710
ISSN-L : 0484-6710
Volume 48 , Issue 3
Showing 1-29 articles out of 29 articles from the selected issue
  • Type: Cover
    2003 Volume 48 Issue 3 Pages Cover9-
    Published: May 10, 2003
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (46K)
  • Type: Cover
    2003 Volume 48 Issue 3 Pages Cover10-
    Published: May 10, 2003
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (46K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2003 Volume 48 Issue 3 Pages App13-
    Published: May 10, 2003
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (91K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2003 Volume 48 Issue 3 Pages App14-
    Published: May 10, 2003
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (91K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2003 Volume 48 Issue 3 Pages App15-
    Published: May 10, 2003
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (73K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2003 Volume 48 Issue 3 Pages App16-
    Published: May 10, 2003
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (66K)
  • Makoto Chogahara
    Type: Article
    2003 Volume 48 Issue 3 Pages 245-268
    Published: May 10, 2003
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The objectives of the present paper were to consolidate current research findings on the physical activities of middle-aged and older adults in an attempt to establish scientific objectives and practical tasks that may assist in the future promotion of these physical activities. Previous research is classified into the following categories : 1) Benefit studies, which explore, both individually and socially, the beneficial effects of participation in physical activities by middle-aged and older adults ; 2) Determinant studies, which explore the individual and social factors that influence participation in physical activity among middle-aged and older adults ; and 3) Project studies, which explore the programs and interventions that effectively facilitate the participation of the middle-aged and older adults in physical activities. Numerous benefit and determinant studies have accumulated useful scientific findings for the promotion of physical activities, while project studies have primarily focused on the evaluation of large-scale promotions, which employed mass media campaigns and counseling strategies at both state and local government levels. The findings of previous benefit and determinant studies should be considered in the design of future project studies in order to promote greater participation of this population in physical activity. Furthermore, scientific information must be provided for promotional activities at the local government level in Japan.
    Download PDF (2488K)
  • Tomohiro Okura, Ryosuke Shigematsu, Yoshio Nakata, Tomoaki Sakai, Dong ...
    Type: Article
    2003 Volume 48 Issue 3 Pages 269-279
    Published: May 10, 2003
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A study was conducted to investigate the influences of diet using supplemental foods and aerobic exercise on segmental body composition, body fat distribution and physical fitness in middle-aged women with intra-abdominal fat (IF) obesity. Twenty-five women were randomly divided into two treatment groups ; a group with a low-energy diet (D) and a group with D combined with exercise (DE). To ensure proper daily nutrition, the subjects were instructed to take every day a well-balanced supplemental food developed for very low-energy diets (170 kcal per pack). In addition to restricting energy intake, subjects from the DE group performed a bench-stepping exercise 3 days/wk for 75 min per session under in-hospital supervision. Whole-body fat mass (FM) and fat- and bone-free mass (FBFM) were assessed by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. The intra-abdominal fat area (IFA) and subcutaneous fat area (SFA) were measured at the level of the umbilicus using computed tomography. Grip and leg extension strength, and maximal oxygen uptake were measured for evaluation of physical fitness. All assays and measurements were carried out before and after a 14-week intervention period. Weight and FM were significantly reduced in both the D (-7.7 kg and -5.8 kg, respectively) and DE (-8.9 kg and -7.3 kg, respectively) groups. All segmental FBFMs were significantly reduced in the D group, whereas FBFMs in the upper and lower limbs of the DE group remained unchanged. IFA and SFA were significantly reduced in both the D (-35 cm^2 and -48 cm^2) and DE (-32 cm^2 and -51 cm^2) groups. In the D group, changes in SFA were significantly and inversely correlated (r=-0.68) with initial values of IFA, but changes in IFA were not. Grip strength (+17%) and maximal oxygen uptake (+28%) were significantly increased in the DE group. No significant de-creases were found between any physical fitness variables in the D group. These results suggest that (1) the DE treatment possibly diminished the reduction in the FBFMs in the upper and lower limbs, and that (2) less SFA was reduced in the D group with much more IFA at the baseline. Moreover, the D treatment did not induce decreases in physical fitness in response to the weight loss.
    Download PDF (1151K)
  • Yoshihiko Fukugasako, SUROTO SUROTO, Satoshi Komatsuzaki, Kohei Yonemu ...
    Type: Article
    2003 Volume 48 Issue 3 Pages 281-297
    Published: May 10, 2003
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A study was conducted to examine the significance of "momentum" in physical education classes. The term "momentum" means the percentage of learning engagement in the motor learning episodes of physical education classes. A new instrument was developed to assist with the observation of momentum. In order to examine the significance of momentum in physical education classes, the relationship between learning engagement and students' formative evaluation of physical education classes was analyzed. Sixty physical education classes in 16 elementary schools were investigated, and the main results were as follows : 1) The total time of PE content and motor learning episodes showed significant positive correlations with formative evaluation scores. In contrast, the total time of management episodes had significant negative correlations with formative evaluation scores. 2) The percentage of learning engagement, especially motor learning engagement, showed significant positive correlations with formative evaluation scores. Conversely, the percentage of nonlearning engagement, especially off-task behavior, had significant negative correlations with formative evaluation scores. 3) These results suggest that momentum in physical education classes is positively related to students' evaluation. Thus, it is reconfirmed that momentum is one of the most important factors for producing effective physical education classes. 4) It was also confirmed that the observation instrument used in this study is effective for evaluating momentum in physical education classes.
    Download PDF (1593K)
  • Yoichi Hayashi, Tomohiro Okura, Masaki Nakagaichi, Kiyoji Tanaka
    Type: Article
    2003 Volume 48 Issue 3 Pages 299-312
    Published: May 10, 2003
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Basing exercise prescriptions on self-selected exercise intensity (SS exercise intensity) has become increasingly popular among exercise professionals. However, because individuals tend to select a low intensity at which to exercise, it is unknown whether exercising at a self-selected intensity provides sufficient health benefits for most of the population. It may be more efficacious to prescribe predetermined loads in combination with SS exercise intensity. To evaluate this premise, this study compared the level of SS exercise intensity following brief sessions of moderate- or high-intensity exercise. Three exercise trials of 20 min were compared in 8 healthy men, aged 24.6±1.8 years. During the first trial (baseline), the subjects performed 20 min of cycling at a SS exercise intensity. The other two trials consisted of 5 min fixed-load cycling at 50% (moderate intensity) or 70% (high intensity) of maximal oxygen uptake (SSFL_<50%> and SSFL_<70%>) followed by 15 min cycling at a SS exercise intensity. The SS exercise intensity (Watts) was higher immediately after both moderate and/or high fixed load exercise bouts compared to the baseline SS trial. However, the ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) during SSFL_<50%> were similar to the responses during the baseline SS trial. These data suggest that exercising at a moderate and/or high fixed load prior to exercising at a SS exercise intensity will increase the intensity of exercise. Therefore, it is recommended that prescriptions for aerobic exercise include a combination of fixed load and SS exercise intensity.
    Download PDF (1460K)
  • Kenji Tauchi, Sungjin Yoon, Kaoru Takamatsu
    Type: Article
    2003 Volume 48 Issue 3 Pages 313-325
    Published: May 10, 2003
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The purpose of this study was to investigate power output characteristics of the upper and lower limbs in individuals during stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) movement focusing on a comparison between throwers and jumpers. Five throwers, five jumpers and five active males performed purely concentric (PC) and SSC movement for both the upper limbs (concentric throw : CT and rebound throw : RT) and the lower limbs (squat jump : SJ and rebound jump : RJ). The upper and lower limb powers were assessed using Throw-index and Jump-index designed by the author, respectively. Prestretch augmentation (Augmentation) was defined as the ratio of the index of SSC movement to the index of PC movement in each upper and lower limb movement. Shoulder and ankle joint stiffness were calculated as joint work divided by angular displacement during the eccentric phase of SSC movement (Arampatzis et al., 1999). The results were as follows : 1) Throw-index and Jump-index of SSC movement were significant higher than those of PC movements. When analyzing the subjects as one group (n=15), there were no significant correlations between Throw-index and Jump-index (in PC : r=0.175, ns ; in SSC : r=0.l95, ns). 2) Throwers tended to have comparatively predominant upper limb power and jumpers comparatively predominant lower limb power in SSC movement. Moreover, when throwers (n=5) and jumpers (n=5) were analyzed as separate groups, there were high correlations between Throw-index and Jump-index in both the jumper and the thrower groups in SSC movement (Throwers : r=0.838 ; p<0.10, Jumpers : r=0.932 ; p<0.05). 3) There was a negative correlation between shoulder joint stiffness and Throw-index (r=-0.468, p<0.10). In contrast, there was a positive correlation between ankle joint stiffness and Jump-index (r=0.673, p<0.01). 4) Jumpers showed both higher shoulder and ankle joint stiffness than throwers. These results indicate that throwers and jumpers respectively obtained specific upper and lower power output characteristics through years of specific training.
    Download PDF (1342K)
  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2003 Volume 48 Issue 3 Pages 327-328
    Published: May 10, 2003
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (296K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2003 Volume 48 Issue 3 Pages 329-333
    Published: May 10, 2003
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (316K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2003 Volume 48 Issue 3 Pages 334-339
    Published: May 10, 2003
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (387K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2003 Volume 48 Issue 3 Pages 340-341
    Published: May 10, 2003
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (143K)
  • Type: Bibliography
    2003 Volume 48 Issue 3 Pages 342-
    Published: May 10, 2003
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (19K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2003 Volume 48 Issue 3 Pages 343-344
    Published: May 10, 2003
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (118K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2003 Volume 48 Issue 3 Pages 345-346
    Published: May 10, 2003
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (84K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2003 Volume 48 Issue 3 Pages 347-
    Published: May 10, 2003
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (30K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2003 Volume 48 Issue 3 Pages 348-
    Published: May 10, 2003
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (28K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2003 Volume 48 Issue 3 Pages 349-
    Published: May 10, 2003
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (72K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2003 Volume 48 Issue 3 Pages 350-
    Published: May 10, 2003
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (62K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2003 Volume 48 Issue 3 Pages 351-
    Published: May 10, 2003
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (63K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2003 Volume 48 Issue 3 Pages App17-
    Published: May 10, 2003
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (90K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2003 Volume 48 Issue 3 Pages App18-
    Published: May 10, 2003
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (90K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2003 Volume 48 Issue 3 Pages App19-
    Published: May 10, 2003
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (68K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2003 Volume 48 Issue 3 Pages App20-
    Published: May 10, 2003
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (68K)
  • Type: Cover
    2003 Volume 48 Issue 3 Pages Cover11-
    Published: May 10, 2003
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (41K)
  • Type: Cover
    2003 Volume 48 Issue 3 Pages Cover12-
    Published: May 10, 2003
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (41K)
feedback
Top