Japanese Journal of Phytopathology
Online ISSN : 1882-0484
Print ISSN : 0031-9473
ISSN-L : 0031-9473
Volume 59 , Issue 1
Showing 1-14 articles out of 14 articles from the selected issue
  • [in Japanese]
    1993 Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages 1-2
    Published: February 25, 1993
    Released: February 19, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Sung Joon YOO, Hideki WATANABE, Kiroku KOBAYASHI, Akira OGOSHI, Fujio ...
    1993 Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages 3-9
    Published: February 25, 1993
    Released: February 19, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs) within seventy-five isolates of Fusarium oxysporum pathogenic to the Liliaceae, i.e. ff. sp. garlic, lilii, asparagi, cepae, allii and tulipae, were determined. The nitrate non-utilizing mutants (nit mutants) were recovered from F. oxysporum isolates cultured on minimal agar amended with 1.5% potassium chlorate. Nit mutants were assigned to one of three phenotypic classes (nit1, nit3, nitM) by their ability to utilize various nitrogen sources. Vegetative compatibility between isolates was demonstrated with heterokaryon formation between complementary nit mutants. Fiftyeight isolates of F. oxysporum f. sp. garlic were placed into 3 VCGs. Five isolates of F. oxysporum f. sp. asparagi were placed into 2 VCGs and 12 isolates of F. oxysporum ff. sp. lilii, cepae, allii and tulipae belonged to a VCG each of formae speciales. Vegetative compatibility was not detected among isolates from different formae speciales of F. oxysporum tested.
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  • Toshiyuki MORIKAWA, Takashi YAMAMOTO, Tokuji FUKUDA, Yoshikuni NOMURA, ...
    1993 Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages 10-17
    Published: February 25, 1993
    Released: February 19, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Post-harvest blackish-brown rot in tulip bulbs, seemingly due to bacteria was found in Toyama Prefecture from July to August, 1987. The brownish, non-uniform lesions occurred on the outer scales of affected bulbs and sometimes invaded the top of second and third scales. Detailed observation of development of the disease in affected bulbs revealed two different types of symptoms (Types-I, -II). The margin of type-I lesions generally spread into the surface tissues of scale, whereas those of type-II generally spread into the inner tissues of the scale. However, the initial spots were so similar to each other that they could not be distinguished. Frequently, the color of the lesions of type-II was more brownish than that of type-I. Twenty four bacterial isolates were obtained from the affected bulbs. These isolates were divided into two groups based on physiological and serologica characteristics of the bacteria. The groups corresponded to the original symptom types, that is, group-I were isolates from type-I, while group-II were from type-II. Each group caused the disease and produced the original symptoms when artificially inoculated. Twelve isolates of group-I were identified as Pseudomonas andropogonis, the causal bacterium of bacterial black rot in tulip bulbs, while 12 isolates of group-II were founded to be Pseudomonas gladioli. This paper presents the first reported case of the disease caused by P. gladioli and the name bacterial brown rot in tulip bulbs is proposed.
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  • Katsumi AKUTSU, Akiko HIRATA, Michiko YAMAMOTO, Kazuyuki HIRAYAE, Sato ...
    1993 Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages 18-25
    Published: February 25, 1993
    Released: February 19, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Serratia marcescens (isolate B2 from tomato phylloplane) inhibited markedly the growth of Botrytis allii, B. byssoidea, B. cinerea, B. fabae and B. tulipae on LB agar medium containing colloidal chitin. The conidial germination and hyphal growth of B. cinerea and B. fabae were also suppressed by culture filtrate of the bacterium. The inhibitory effect of the bacterium correlated with its chitinolytic activity. On leaf disks of broad bean, the bacterium could control chocolate spot disease caused by B. fabae. These results indicate the possibility of using S. marcescens as a biocontrol agent for Botrytis spp.
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  • Kazutoshi MATSUO
    1993 Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages 26-32
    Published: February 25, 1993
    Released: February 19, 2009
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    Three strains of melon necrotic spot virus, NH strain (MSNV-NH), NK strain (MSNV-NK) and S strain (MNSV-S), were detected by direct double antibody sandwich ELISA (DAS-ELISA), nonprecoated indirect ELISA (Np-I-ELISA) and precoated indirect double antibody sandwich ELISA (P-I-ELISA) using the respective antiserum. The three methods of ELISA using these homologous antisera proved to be applicable for discriminating between healthy and infected melon (Cucumis melo L.), with detection end points ranging from 10-4-10-5 dilution of leaf extracts and 0.01μg/ml of purified preparations. On the other hand, in heterologous reactants, the absorbance values on MNSV-NH and MNSV-NK, both were serologically identical, were almost the same as those in homologous reactants by the three methods of ELISA, and the two strains could be detected reciprocally with each heterologous antiserum. The two strains of serotype N and the strain of serotype S (MNSV-S) could be reciprocally detected by Np-I-ELISA, therefore Np-I-ELISA seemed to be the most useful for the diagnosis of field samples. However, the absorbance values on the serotype N strains and the serotype S strain in heterologous reactants by DAS-ELISA and P-I-ELISA were considerably lower than those in homologous reactants. Thus, two types of antisera to serotype N and serotype S were indispensable for the diagnosis of field samples by these two methods. Nevertheless, the two methods could distinguish the two serotypes of MNSV. All isolates of MNSV collected from various melon-cultivating areas in Japan were serotype N, MNSV-NH or MNSV-NK.
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  • Yoshikuni NOMURA
    1993 Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages 33-36
    Published: February 25, 1993
    Released: February 19, 2009
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    Pathogenicity of Fusarium causing wilts on Cucurbitaceous plants was examined. Cucurbita ficifolia and C. maxima were attacked by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lagenariae, but not by F. oxysporum f. sp. melonis, f. sp. cucumerinum, f. sp. niveum and f. sp. luffae. But C. ficifolia was infected with F. oxysporum f. sp. melonis without external symptom, because the pathogen was isolated in a high rate from the hypocotyl tissues with browned vascular bundles. Therefore it was considered that C. ficifolia infected with F. oxysporum f. sp. melonis might wilt acutely under bad conditions. On the other hand, neither symptom nor symptomless infection by the above five pathogens was recognized in C. moschata, C. pepo and C. maxima×C. moschata.
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  • Mitsuro KAMEYA-IWAKI, Hiroshi KAJIHARA, Shuhei TANAKA, Seiji UEMATSU
    1993 Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages 37-39
    Published: February 25, 1993
    Released: February 19, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The virus isolated from Iceland poppy showing mosaic symptoms was identified as turnip mosaic virus based on host range, symptoms, transmission mode, particle morphology and serological relationships. The virus infected 15 plant species of 8 families among 25 species of 9 families tested, and was transmitted by aphid in a nonpersistent manner. Virus particles were filamentous flexuous, 760-770nm in length. The virus showed close serological relationships with turnip mosaic virus. Stabilities in crude sap were 55-60°C for 10 min, 10-4-10-5 and 3-5 days at room temperature.
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  • 1993 Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages 40-47
    Published: February 25, 1993
    Released: February 19, 2009
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  • 1993 Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages 48-56
    Published: February 25, 1993
    Released: February 19, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • 1993 Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages 57-63
    Published: February 25, 1993
    Released: February 19, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • 1993 Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages 64-73
    Published: February 25, 1993
    Released: February 19, 2009
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  • 1993 Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages 73-87
    Published: February 25, 1993
    Released: February 19, 2009
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  • 1993 Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages 88-94
    Published: February 25, 1993
    Released: February 19, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • 1993 Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages 95-104
    Published: February 25, 1993
    Released: February 19, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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