The Journal of the Japan Society for Respiratory Endoscopy
Online ISSN : 2186-0149
Print ISSN : 0287-2137
ISSN-L : 0287-2137
Volume 37 , Issue 3
Showing 1-50 articles out of 187 articles from the selected issue
  • Type: Cover
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages Cover1-
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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  • Type: Appendix
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages App1-
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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  • Type: Appendix
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages App2-
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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  • Type: Index
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages Toc1-
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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  • Type: Index
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages Toc2-
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 251-252
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 253-254
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 255-256
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 257-258
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 259-260
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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  • Kosuke Suzuki, Akihiko Kitami, Yoshito Kamio, Shinichi Ohashi, Fumitos ...
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 261-266
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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    Background. Influenza (H1N1)2009 spread on a pandemic scale in 2009, which resulted in a large number of infected cases in Japan. Even in 2010, numerous cases of influenza (H1N1)2009 infection were reported. Those afflicted were predominantly children. Many children were admitted to our hospital, some of whom experienced respiratory failure and required artificial respiration. Objective. To determine the factors of respiratory failure associated with (H1N1)2009 infection. Subjects and Methods. Between September 2009 and March 2010, 116 children were admitted to our hospital, and 71 children (52 boys and 19 girls) had pneumonia or bronchitis associated with influenza (H1N1)2009. Among these, 5 suffered respiratory failure that required bronchial intubation and artificial ventilation, and bronchoscopy was performed for all of these cases. Results. The 5 cases included 4 boys and 1 girl. Two cases had a past history of asthma, and 3 cases had accompanying infection. The bronchoscopic findings showed mucus plugs occluding the lobar and sublobar bronchi. After removing the mucus plugs, their respiratory condition improved. The microscopic findings of the mucus plugs showed fibrin and inflammatory cells mainly consisting of eosinophils, and we diagnosed plastic bronchitis type. Though 4 cases were discharged, 1 died due to myocarditis. Conclusions. A high incidence of plastic bronchitis was observed among pediatric patients with influenza (H1N1)2009 infection. Bronchoscopy should be considered for treating cases when plastic bronchitis is present.
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  • Dai Miura, Yukihiro Hasegawa, Tomohiro Ota
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 267-272
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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    Background. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) and invasive procedures with bronchoscopes are commonly performed under intubation. Midazolam is most frequently used for sedation but respiratory depression is a problem. Dexmedetomidine has the advantage of causing mild respiratory depression at higher doses so that is better suited for lower lung function patients which are examined by bronchoscopy. We investigated the safety of dexmedetomidine used for invasive procedures with bronchoscopy under intubated patients in our hospital. Methods. Dexmedetomidine was used for patients who underwent invasive bronchoscopy procedures between October 2013 and October 2014. Twenty six patients which had the necessary time-series data were analyzed. It was administered as an infusion at an initial rate of 6 μg/kg per hour for 10 minutes and subsequently titrated between 0.2 μg/kg per hour and 0.7 μg/kg per hour to maintain a Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale (RASS) of -3. We administered 1-2 ml intravenous injections of 1% propofol when the sedation was insufficiency. Blood pressure, heart rate and oxygen saturation (SpO_2) were recorded. Discomfort, and delirium for the patients were also recorded. Results. The mean reduction of systolic blood pressure, the mean lowest heart rate and the mean lowest oxygen saturation were 45 mmHg, 63/min and 94% during bronchoscopy, respectively. Hypotension was treated by infusion of normal saline, but no patients required vasopressor agents. No patients required treatment of respiratory depression. RASS of -3 was maintained. The patients had no delirium and had a short recovery time after the procedures. There were no fatal complications. Conclusion. Dexmedetomidine was associated with fewer incidents of oxygen desaturation during bronchoscopy. Dexmedetomidine was safe and tolerated as well as conventional sedative.
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  • Naotaka Noda, Nobuyuki Hirose
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 273-278
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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    Background. Sedation for bronchoscopy reduces pain, although there is a risk of respiratory depression, and understanding how to clarify the aspects of pleural pain during transbronchial brushing and/or biopsy remains limited. Subjects and Methods. We retrospectively analyzed the utility and safety of local anesthesia and combination treatment with sedatives and local anesthesia among patients in whom transbronchial brushing and/or a biopsy was performed between September 2004 and September 2014 at our institution. Both groups underwent nebulizer inhalation of 4% lidocaine at a dose of 10 ml, with midazolam added in the sedative combination group. We administered 2.5 mg of midazolam and an additional 2.5 mg of midazolam in cases of insufficient sedation. Bronchoscopy was performed after confirming sedation. We analyzed the number of samples unsuitable for diagnosis and the incidence of adverse events, and the degree of pain was classified into five levels in the two groups. Results. The local anesthesia group included 192 cases, and the sedative combination group included 211 cases. The number of samples unsuitable for diagnosis was not significantly different between the two groups. The rates of adverse reactions were also similar in both groups. There were three cases of pneumothorax in the local anesthesia group (1.56%) and two cases in the sedative combination group (0.95%). There was one case of pneumonia in the local anesthesia group (0.52%) and three cases in the sedative combination group (1.42%). In the sedative combination group, there was one case of hypotension (0.47%). The amount of oxygen supplementation and decrease in percutaneous oxygen saturation were greater in the sedative combination group than in the local anesthesia group. The patient's pain was significantly diminished by using sedatives in addition to local anesthesia. Conclusions. Although bronchoscopy using sedatives in addition to local anesthesia requires monitoring of changes in the patient's respiratory condition, it is possible to obtain a suitable sample for diagnosis, taking advantage of reducing pain.
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  • Takeshi Matsumoto, Kojiro Otsuka, Daichi Fujimoto, Takahisa Kawamura, ...
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 279-284
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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    Background. Thoracoscopy under local anesthesia has been performed for the histological diagnosis in cases suspected of malignant pleural effusion. However, there are no previous studies about factors contributing to the histological diagnosis in cases without lesions suspected of malignant pleural diseases (malignant pleural lesions) on chest CT. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed 71 patients who underwent thoracoscopy under local anesthesia from May 2007 to February 2013. For patients diagnosed with malignant pleural effusion, we compared the values of pleural effusion and the serum and endoscopic findings of the chest cavity between the cases that could be histologically diagnosed (biopsy-proven group) and those that could not (not biopsy-proven group) among the subjects without malignant pleural lesions on chest CT. Results. There were 11 patients without malignant pleural lesions on chest CT in both the carcinomatous pleurisy and malignant pleural mesothelioma groups. The number of subjects in the biopsy-proven group was five (45%) for both carcinomatous pleurisy and malignant pleural mesothelioma. In the malignant pleural mesothelioma group, the rate of detection of tumors during observation of the chest cavity was significantly higher in the biopsy-proven group than in the not biopsy-proven group (presence/absence 5/0 vs. 1/5, p = 0.015). The values of the pleural effusion and serum did not differ between the groups. In the carcinomatous pleurisy group, seven (64%) patients were found to have masses in the chest cavity, four (57%) of which were histologically diagnosed. In the malignant pleural mesothelioma group, six (55% ) patients were found to have masses in the chest cavity, five (83%) of which were histologically diagnosed. Conclusion. In cases without malignant pleural lesions on chest CT, obtaining confirmation of the tumors during observation of the chest cavity with thoracoscopy under local anesthesia potentially contributes to the histological diagnosis. Therefore, aggressive observation of the chest cavity is important.
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  • Takuma Yokoyama, Aya Hirata, Tomotaka Nishizawa, Manabu Ishida, Miku O ...
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 285-289
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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    Background. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) exhibits a high diagnostic yield and is a less invasive procedure for evaluating mediastinal and hilar lymphadenopathies. In this report, we describe a case of pleural mesothelioma diagnosed based on the detection of metastases to the mediastinal lymph nodes on EBUS-TBNA. Case. An 81-year-old man noted a cough and shortness of breath on exertion for several years. An abnormal chest shadow was observed on a chest X-ray obtained during a medical check-up, and the patient was admitted to a prior hospital. However, he was not diagnosed using a closed pleural biopsy and was instead followed without therapy. He was subsequently referred to our hospital due to the exacerbation of right pleural effusion. We therefore performed EBUS-TBNA of the mediastinal lymph nodes (#4R) using immunohisto-chemistry and pathologically diagnosed the patient with mediastinal lymph node metastasis of pleural mesothelioma. Conclusions. EBUS-TBNA of metastases to the mediastinal lymph nodes is an effective means of detecting pleural mesothelioma.
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  • Junko Tokuno, Tsuyoshi Shoji, Yuichiro Ueda, Ryo Okabe, Hiroyuki Cho, ...
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 290-292
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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    Background. Cases of pleomorphic adenoma of the trachea are rare. Case. A 38-year-old man who had around a year-long history of worsening dyspnea was admitted to our hospital. A computed tomography scan revealed a tumor of the trachea almost completely obstructing the tracheal lumen in the mid-trachea. Venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA ECMO) was prepared prior to the induction of anesthesia, then, after establishing artificial respiration as usual, weaning off VA ECMO and tracheal tubular resection was performed. Postoperative pathological examination revealed pleomorphic adenoma. Conclusion. We report an extremely rare case of tracheal pleomorphic tumor successfully resected by surgery with general anesthesia induced under VA ECMO.
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  • Makoto Hibino, Motoki Ohe, Tetsuri Kondo
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 293-296
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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    Background. Nasogastric tube syndrome is a potentially fatal but treatable complication of an indwelling nasogastric tube, which causes vocal cord abductor paralysis and upper airway obstruction. Case. We report a case of a 51-year-old woman who developed this syndrome after hospitalization for putaminal hemorrhage. Vocal cord abductor paralysis was caused by inflammation of the posterior cricoarytenoid muscle, as confirmed by computed tomography. The patient was successfully treated with antibiotics, corticosteroids, and proton-pump inhibitors. Conclusion. While a nasogastric tube is commonly used in various settings, the syndrome itself is rare. Clinicians should learn more about this complication to avoid underdiagnosis and administer prompt treatment.
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  • Hidekatsu Shibata, Takamasa Koga, Kenji Shiraishi, Koei Ikeda, Takeshi ...
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 297-302
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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    Background. Pulmonary tumorlets are commonly found in patients with diseased lungs. However, there are reports of tumorlets causing fibrosis and hyperplasia of the smooth muscle in the bronchus similar to the paracrine effect of neuroendocrine cells. Case. The patient was a 64-year-old woman. A nodule was detected incidentally in the left lung S^6 by chest CT, suggesting malignancy. We performed a left S^6 segmentectomy for diagnosis and treatment. The nodule was noted to be a firm, glass-like mass in the bronchus, but it was easily dissected from the pulmonary artery. The resected specimen showed accumulation of brown mucus material in the bronchi. Histological examination showed fibrosis of the bronchus wall, intricate infiltration of smooth muscle, inflammatory cells, and tumor cells in the fibrotic bronchial wall. Paracrine action of tumorlet cells thought to be neuroendocrine in origin was assumed to have been the cause of bronchiectasis. Conclusion. Tumorlets causing a local picture of bronchiectasis should be considered in patients with diseased lungs.
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  • Ryoko Osada, Yoshiro Nakahara, Yusuke Okuma, Shinichiro Mikura, Tsunek ...
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 303-307
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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    Background. Thoracoscopic lung biopsy is often necessary to diagnose primary pulmonary mucosaassociated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. Primary pulmonary MALT lymphoma diagnosed by transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB) is extremely rare. Case. A 70-year-old man had an abnormal shadow on an chest X-ray film 10 years earlier; however, he did not receive any therapy. He was referred to our hospital by his doctor for an abnormal chest shadow on a routine health checkup in 2013. Mild dilatation of the left B^4a bronchus, thickening of bronchovascular bundles, and a 23-mm-diameter nodular shadow with an extended bronchiole in the periphery were seen. TBLB was performed, and diagnosed as MALT lymphoma by immunostaining and PCR analysis of immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangement. No lesions were found in other organs; therefore, the diagnosis was primary pulmonary MALT lymphoma. We observed the patient, without any additional treatment. He is presently alive without disease progression. Conclusion. It is important to examine not only the pathologic findings but also immunostaining and PCR analysis of immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangement in making the diagnosis of MALT lymphoma.
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  • Tetsuya Yokosuka, Hitoshi Saito, Naoyuki Kuse, Yuji Kusunoki
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 308-311
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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    Background. We here report a case of surgical tracheal resection for a rare benign tracheal schwannoma, also known as neurilemmoma, and discuss the different therapeutic options. Case. A 47-year-old man presented to our hospital with progressive shortness of breath and bloody sputum. Bronchoscopy demonstrated a widebased submucosal tumor on the membranous portion of the lower trachea. A tissue biopsy was performed and the tumor was diagnosed as benign schwannoma. Segmental resection of the trachea with a primary end-to-end anastomosis was successfully performed via right posterolateral thoracotomy. The postoperative course was uneventful, and at the latest follow-up, the patient was doing well and was recurrence-free. Conclusion. We encountered a case of tracheal schwannoma successfully treated with partial tracheal resection and end-to-end anastomosis. The appropriate treatment (surgery or bronchoscopic resection) for benign tracheal tumors should be carefully decided on the basis of the clinical findings.
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  • Takanobu Johtatsu, Kei Yamasaki, Kazuhiro Yatera, Kentarou Akata, Chin ...
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 312-318
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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    Background. There is no established treatment for paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD). Systemic chemotherapy is mainly performed for treating PCD, but is generally ineffective. Various treatments for PCD have been reported. Case. A 63-year-old Japanese man was admitted because of dizziness and a drifting sensation. He was treated with anticoagulant agents, but without effect. Then he was transferred to our hospital for further examinations. Chest X-ray film and computed tomography (CT) revealed mediastinal lymphadenopathy. Endobronchial ultrasonography-guided transbronchial needle aspiration cytology from an enlarged mediastinal lymph node revealed small cell carcinoma, therefore he was diagnosed as having small cell lung cancer (cTxN2M0, limited disease) with PCD. Concurrent systemic chemotherapy (CE: carboplatin + etoposide) and mediastinal radiotherapy were performed, but his neurological symptoms did not respond to treatment. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy was applied 19 days after the start of systemic chemotherapy, and his neurological symptoms gradually improved. Conclusion. Early application of IVIG treatment may lead to an improvement of PCD.
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  • Manabu Sema, Tsukasa Okamoto, Kimitake Tsuchiya, Yu Kusaka, Yoshihisa ...
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 319-323
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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    Background. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) has been considered useful for the diagnosis of tuberculous lymphadenopathy. Case. A 76-year-old man had fever and general malaise at the time of introduction of hemodialysis. Chest CT images showed mediastinal lymphadenopathies. We performed EBUS-TBNA twice targetting mainly nonnecrotizing area of mediastinal lymph node, but could not confirm a diagnosis pathologically or bacteriologically. Subsequently, mediastinal lymph nodes resected by mediastinoscopy revealed necrotizing granulomas with Langhans giant cell, and a positive culture for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We diagnosed of tuberculous lymphadenopathy. Conclusion. Generally, EBUS-TBNA has been considered to be useful for the diagnosis of tuberculous lymphadenopathy, but occasionally it is difficult to diagnose it even by EBUS-TBNA.
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  • Fumihiro Ishibashi, Hajime Tamura, Yukiko Matsui, Yasumitsu Moriya, Hi ...
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 324-328
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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    Background. Endobronchial myxoma is an extremely rare benign neoplasm. Case. A 58-year-old man was referred to our department because an abnormal shadow had been detected on chest radiography. Chest CT imaging revealed a nodular lesion in the middle lobe bronchus and atelectasis of the right middle lobe. FDG-PET scanning showed low metabolic activity in this tumor. Bronchoscopic examination revealed a polypoid, well-circumscribed tumor, which was causing total obstruction of the middle lobe bronchus. A biopsy of this polyp was non-diagnostic. This patient underwent a middle lobe lobectomy. A microscopic examination of the tumor revealed myxoid stroma with loose spindle cells without atypia. Ultimately, we diagnosed primary endobronchial myxoma. Conclusion. We reported a rare case of primary endobronchial myxoma.
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  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 329-
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 329-
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japane ...
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 329-
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japane ...
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 329-
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japane ...
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 329-
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japane ...
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 329-330
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japane ...
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 330-
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japane ...
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 330-
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 330-
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japane ...
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 330-
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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    Download PDF (272K)
  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japane ...
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 330-
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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    Download PDF (272K)
  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japane ...
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 330-331
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japane ...
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 331-
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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    Download PDF (251K)
  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 331-
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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    Download PDF (251K)
  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japane ...
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 331-
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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    Download PDF (251K)
  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japane ...
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 331-
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (251K)
  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japane ...
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 331-
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (251K)
  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japane ...
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 331-
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (251K)
  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japane ...
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 331-332
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japane ...
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 332-
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japane ...
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 332-
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japane ...
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 332-
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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    Download PDF (250K)
  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japane ...
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 332-
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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    Download PDF (250K)
  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japane ...
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 332-
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japane ...
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 333-
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 333-
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japane ...
    Type: Article
    2015 Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 333-
    Published: May 25, 2015
    Released: October 29, 2016
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