Journal of Nippon Medical School
Online ISSN : 1347-3409
Print ISSN : 1345-4676
ISSN-L : 1345-4676
Volume 84 , Issue 1
Showing 1-8 articles out of 8 articles from the selected issue
Review
  • Hidehisa Saeki
    2017 Volume 84 Issue 1 Pages 2-11
    Published: January 15, 2017
    Released: March 22, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    The guidelines for the treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD) issued by the Japanese Dermatological Association (JDA), which are basically designed for dermatologists, were first prepared in 2000 and revised in 2016. The guidelines for AD of the Japanese Society of Allergology (JSA), which are basically designed for allergologists, including internists, otorhinolaryngologists, ophthalmologists, and dermatologists, were first prepared in 2009 and revised in 2014. In this article, I review the definition, pathophysiology, etiology, epidemiology, diagnosis, severity classification, examination for diagnosis and severity assessment, and treatments for AD in Japan according to these two guidelines for AD (JDA and JSA). Based on the definition and diagnostic criteria for AD of the JDA, patients meeting three basic criteria, 1) pruritus, 2) typical morphology and distribution of the eczema, and 3) chronic or chronically relapsing course, are regarded as having AD. Treatment measures for AD basically consist of drug therapy, skin care, and elimination of exacerbating factors. Drugs that potently reduce AD-related inflammation in the skin are topical corticosteroids and tacrolimus. It is most important to promptly and accurately reduce inflammation related to AD by using these topical anti-inflammatory drugs. Proactive therapy refers to a treatment method in which, after inducing remission, a topical corticosteroid or tacrolimus ointment is intermittently applied to the skin in addition to skin care with moisturizers in order to maintain remission.

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Originals
  • Yoshiaki Hara, Mohammad Ghazizadeh, Hajime Shimizu, Hisashi Matsumoto, ...
    2017 Volume 84 Issue 1 Pages 12-18
    Published: January 15, 2017
    Released: March 22, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Background: The healing process of bone fracture requires a well-controlled multistage and sequential order beginning immediately after the injury. However, complications leading to nonunion exist, creating serious problems and costs for patients. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) and bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP-2) are two major growth factors involved in human bone fracture healing by promoting various stages of bone ossification. In this study, we aimed to determine the role of these factors during the fracture healing of human long bones and assess their impacts on nonunion condition. Materials and Methods: We performed a comprehensive analysis of plasma TGF-β1 and BMP-2 levels in blood samples from 10 patients with proved nonunion and 10 matched patients with normal union following a predetermined time schedule. The concentrations of TGF-β1 and BMP-2 were measured at each time point using a solid-phase ELISA. Results: TGF-β1 and BMP-2 levels were detectable in all patients. For all patients, a maximal peak for TGF-β1 was found at 3-week. In normal union group, TGF-β1 showed a maximal peak at 2-week while nonunion group had a delayed maximal peak at 3-week. Plasma levels of BMP-2 for all patients and for normal union group reached a maximal peak at 1-week, but nonunion group showed a delayed maximal peak at 2-week. In general, plasma TGF-β1 or BMP-2 level was not significantly different between normal union and nonunion groups. Conclusion: The expression levels of TGF-β1 and BMP-2 appeared to be delayed in nonunion patients which could play an important role in developing an early marker of fracture union condition and facilitate improved patient's management.

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  • Hiroshi Hashiguchi, Satoshi Iwashita, Atsushi Okubo, Shinro Takai
    2017 Volume 84 Issue 1 Pages 19-24
    Published: January 15, 2017
    Released: March 22, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical and radiological outcomes of arthroscopic treatment for refractory rotator cuff calcific tendinitis of the shoulder. Methods: Subjects were 37 patients (35 women and 2 men; mean age, 47.8 years; age range 34-61 years) who had undergone arthroscopic treatment for calcific tendinitis of the shoulder. Despite sufficient nonsurgical treatments, all patients had residual calcific deposit with persistent or recurrent pain. Before surgery, all patients underwent 3-directional radiographs of the shoulder and three-dimensional computed tomography to determine the location and size of calcific deposit. Arthroscopic surgery was performed with the patient under general anesthesia in the lateral decubitus position. A 2-cm single longitudinal incision was made with a radiofrequency hook blade on the tendon surface above calcific deposit. Calcific deposit was removed as much as possible with a curette and a motorized shaver. The incised tendon was repaired with a side-to-side suture with strong sutures. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association shoulder score was used to evaluate clinical outcomes. The extent of calcific deposit removal was evaluated with radiographs obtained before surgery, 1 week after the surgery and at the final follow-up examination. Results: The mean follow-up duration was 30.4 (range, 13-72) months. The mean shoulder score significantly improved from 69.7 (range, 58-80) points before surgery to 97.8 (range, 89-100) points at the final follow-up examination. Postoperative radiographs in all patients, showed that the calcific deposit was resolved or reduced and those from 1 week after surgery to the final examination showed no evidence of recurrence or enlargement of calcific deposit. The calcific deposit had completely resolved in 34 patients but remained in 3 patients. Conclusion: When treating calcific tendinitis of the shoulder, it is important to accurately determine the size and location of calcific deposit by radiographs and 3-dimensional computed tomography. Satisfactory clinical and radiological outcomes can be expected after reliable removal of calcific deposit through a single longitudinal incision and side-to-side repair with strong sutures, in association with an appropriate rehabilitation program.

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  • Tsutomu Nomura, Katsuhiko Iwakiri, Takeshi Matsutani, Nobutoshi Hagiwa ...
    2017 Volume 84 Issue 1 Pages 25-31
    Published: January 15, 2017
    Released: March 22, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Background: Laparoscopic anti-reflux surgery (LARS) is generally the treatment of choice for patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This report describes our experiences in performing LARS on patients with GERD, and focuses retrospectively on the pathophysiology of individual patients and the current status of Japanese patients who have undergone LARS. We demonstrate that patients with non-erosive reflux disease resistant to proton pump inhibitors (PPI-resistant NERD) and high-risk giant hernia, whom we are sometimes hesitant to treat surgically, can be safely and successfully treated with LARS (depending on the pathophysiology of individual patients). Methods: Between January 2007 and June 2015, 37 patients underwent LARS at Nippon Medical School Hospital. These patients were retrospectively subgrouped according to pathophysiology; 9 of them had PPI-resistant NERD (Group A), 19 had a giant hiatal hernia (Group B), and 9 had erosive esophagitis (Group N). Patient characteristics, intraoperative bleeding, operation duration, perioperative complications, and length of hospital stay were determined, along with symptomatic outcomes and patient satisfaction. Results: Patients in Group A were the youngest (average: 43.9 years), and those in Group B were the oldest (75.9 years) (P=0.002). The percentage of high-risk patients, as determined by performance status (P=0.047) and American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status classification (P=0.021), was highest in Group B, whereas the percentage of patients with mental disorders was highest in Group A (P=0.012). There were no significant differences among the groups in terms of intraoperative bleeding, surgery duration, or postoperative hospital stay. Thirty-three patients (89.2%), including all 19 in Group B, expressed excellent or good postoperative satisfaction levels. Conclusions: The characteristics of the patients who underwent LARS at our hospital differed according to pathophysiology and from those in western countries. Satisfactory outcomes depended on the pathophysiology of individual patients.

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  • Satoshi Mizutani, Hideyuki Suzuki, Takayuki Aimoto, Seiji Yamagishi, K ...
    2017 Volume 84 Issue 1 Pages 32-40
    Published: January 15, 2017
    Released: March 22, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Background: Characteristics of a cancer-positive margin around a resected uncinate process of the pancreas (MUP) due to a pancreticoduodenectomy are difficult to understand by standardized evaluation because of its complex anatomy. The purposes of this study were to subclassify the MUP with tissue marking dyes of different colors and to identify the characteristics of sites that showed positivity for cancer cells in patients with pancreatic head carcinoma who underwent circumferential superior mesenteric arterial nerve plexus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy. Results of this evaluation were used to review operation procedures and perioperative methods. Method: We divided the MUP into 4 sections and stained each section with a different color. These sections were the pancreatic head nerve plexus margin (Area A), portal vein groove margin (Area B), superior mesenteric artery margin (Area C), and left of the superior mesenteric artery margin (Area D). The subjects evaluated were 45 patients who had carcinoma of the pancreatic head and were treated with circumferential superior mesenteric arterial nerve plexus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy. Results: Of the 45 patients, nine cases (90%) of incomplete resection showed cancer-positivity in the MUP. Among the 4 sections of the MUP, the most cases of positive results [MUP (+) ] were found in Area B, with Area A (+), 0 case; Area B (+), 6 cases; Area C (+), 2 cases; and Area D (+), 3 cases (total, 11 sites in 9 patients). Relapse occurred in 7 of the 9 patients with MUP (+). Local recurrence was observed as initial relapse in all 3 patients with Area D (+). In contrast, the most common site of recurrence other than that in patients with Area D (+) was the liver. Conclusion: By subclassifying the MUP with tissue marking dyes of different colors, we could confirm regional characteristics of MUP (+). As a result, circumferential superior mesenteric arterial nerve plexus-preserving pancreticoduodenectomy was able to be performed in R0 operations in selected patients while a better postoperative quality of life was maintained. Furthermore, Area D (+) represents an extension beyond the limit of the local disease and may indicate the need for early aggressive adjuvant chemotherapy.

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Case Report
  • Tatsuo Ueda, Hiroyuki Tajima, Satoru Murata, Ryo Takagi, Hiroyuki Yoko ...
    2017 Volume 84 Issue 1 Pages 41-44
    Published: January 15, 2017
    Released: March 22, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Traumatic chopstick injury is very rare, especially in the vascular system. We present an unusual case of a 19-year-old man who presented at the emergency department after being stabbed with a chopstick by his elder brother. Computed tomography revealed a left subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm, which increased from 4 mm to 7 mm in diameter within 47 days. We successfully deployed a Niti-S stent graft for the increasing aneurysm, thereby avoiding a surgical operation. Balloon angioplasty was added for re-stenosis 8 months after the first intervention.

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  • Naoto Chihara, Keisuke Mishima, Hideyuki Suzuki, Masanori Watanabe, Te ...
    2017 Volume 84 Issue 1 Pages 45-48
    Published: January 15, 2017
    Released: March 22, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Prosthetic mesh infection after open or laparoscopic hernia repair is a rare complication. Superficial wound infection can be resolved by treatment with a combination of antibiotics and wound drainage, whereas deep-seated mesh infection, which can lead to chronic groin sepsis, usually requires removal of the mesh. A 56-year-old Japanese man was admitted to our hospital for the treatment of deep-seated mesh infection. The patient had undergone inguinal hernia repair at another hospital 18 months earlier. The operation was prosthetic mesh repair via an anterior approach. The patient developed deep-seated mesh infection despite conservative treatment for infection, such as abscess drainage and antibiotic therapy. Since the patient eventually developed chronic groin sepsis, he was referred to our hospital, and infected mesh was removed successfully by laparoscopic surgery via a totally extraperitoneal approach. The laparoscopic approach provides several advantages, including less postoperative pain, a shorter hospital stay, and earlier rehabilitation. Furthermore, seeding of the abdominal cavity with pus never occurs with this approach unlike the laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal approach.

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Short Communication
  • Seiichi Shinji, Hayato Kan, Takeshi Yamada, Michihiro Koizumi, Aya Yam ...
    2017 Volume 84 Issue 1 Pages 49-53
    Published: January 15, 2017
    Released: March 22, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Introduction: Single-port laparoscopic surgery has some technical limitations with respect to control of the forceps inserted through the single-access site, which results in increased internal collisions due to coaxial alignment of the instruments, as well as and decreased range of motion and visualization. To overcome these limitations, we employ a "modified marionette technique" as a way to carry out laparoscopic colorectal surgery. Materials and Surgical Technique: The procedures for the modified marionette technique are performed as follows: An Internal Organ Retractor (IOR)™ and an atraumatic clip designed to firmly grasp tissue, with 1-0 nylon thread, are inserted through a 12-mm trocar and secured in place where adequate visualization and traction for cutting with a radio knife is required. A looped 1-0 nylon thread put through an 18-gauge injection needle is pierced through the abdominal wall, the looped nylon extruded, and the nylon attached to the IOR is pulled out by threading the looped nylon thread. This allows for adequate traction from outside the body through the abdominal wall and appropriate placing adjustments. Conclusion: The "modified marionette technique" using IOR introduced here is an easy, economical, effective and safe traction technique for colorectal surgeries. This technique will be a useful tool for performing both reduced port and multiport laparoscopic colorectal surgeries.

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