Journal of Oleo Science
Online ISSN : 1347-3352
Print ISSN : 1345-8957
Volume 64 , Issue 5
Showing 1-12 articles out of 12 articles from the selected issue
Review
  • Weal Abdelmoez, Eman Ashour, Shahenaz M. Naguib
    2015 Volume 64 Issue 5 Pages 467-478
    Published: 2015
    Released: May 01, 2015
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    It became a global agenda to develop clean alternative fuels which were domestically available, environmentally acceptable and technically feasible. Thus, biodiesel was destined to make a substantial contribution to the future energy demands of the domestic and industrial economies. Utilization of the non edible vegetable oils as raw materials for biodiesel production had been handled frequently for the past few years. The oil content of these seeds could be extracted by different oil extraction methods, such as mechanical extraction, solvent extraction and by subcritical water extraction technology SWT. Among them, SWT represents a new promising green extraction method. Therefore this review covered the current used non edible oil seeds for biodiesel production as well as giving a sharp focus on the efficiency of using the SWT as a promising extraction method. In addition the advantages and the disadvantages of the different biodiesel production techniques would be covered.
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Oils and Fats
  • Shuhsien Wu, Megumi Tokuda, Ayaka Kashiwagi, Atsushi Henmi, Yoshiharu ...
    2015 Volume 64 Issue 5 Pages 479-484
    Published: 2015
    Released: May 01, 2015
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Mango (Mangifera indica L.), an edible fruit, is one of the main agricultural products in many tropical regions. Mango varieties differ in not only fruit shape but also aroma, which is an important characteristic. Although the fruit has many uses, the seeds are discarded as waste. Therefore, this study aimed to estimate the fatty acid content of seed oil of mangoes from different cultivation areas (Miyazaki, Japan, and Taiwan), and to evaluate their application in cosmetics. Five fatty acids were identified in the mango seed oil. Oleic acid and stearic acid were the principal components of mango seed oil obtained from Miyazaki (46.1% and 39.8%, respectively) and Taiwan (43.7% and 40.1%, respectively). As a cosmetic ingredient, mango seed oil showed good deodorizing effect on both 2-nonenal and isovaleric acid. The results indicated the potential applications of mango seed oil in the cosmetic industry.
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  • Valtcho D. Zheljazkov, Tess Astatkie, Ivan Zhalnov, Tonya D. Georgieva
    2015 Volume 64 Issue 5 Pages 485-496
    Published: 2015
    Released: May 01, 2015
    [Advance publication] Released: April 06, 2015
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Rosemary (Rosemarinus officinalis L.) is a well-known medicinal and essential oil plant, utilized by humankind since ancient times. The objective was to determine the effect of steam distillation time (DT) and material (dry or fresh biomass) on essential oil yield, composition, and bioactivity; and to develop regression models that can predict oil yield and composition at specific DT. The oil yield (content) from dry biomass was higher (0.43%) than that from fresh biomass (0.35%) and ranged from 0.18% in the 1.25 min DT to 0.51% in the 40 min DT. There was no yield advantage in extending the DT beyond 40 min, which is much shorter than the DT used by industry. In this study, the antioxidant capacity of the rosemary oil using the ORACoil method was 4,108 μmolVE/L. Rosemary oil did not exhibit significant antileishmanial, antimalarial, or antimicrobial activity. In general, the low-boiling constituents eluted earlier than the higher boiling constituents of the essential oil, resulting in a great variation of essential oil composition obtained at different DT. The most important constituents are α-pinene, eucalyptol, and camphor. The highest α-pinene concentration in the oil (30.4%) was obtained from dry biomass at 2.5 min DT; eucalyptol (23.3% of the total oil) from fresh biomass at 2.5 min DT; and camphor (15.9% of the total oil) from fresh biomass at 160 min DT. The DT could be used as an inexpensive tool to alter essential oil composition of the essential oil from fresh or dried rosemary biomass, and to produce rosemary oils with elevated or lowered concentration of specific targeted oil constituents to meet specific market demands.
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  • Georgina P. Ossani, Valeria C. Denninghoff, Ana M. Uceda, Maria L. Día ...
    2015 Volume 64 Issue 5 Pages 497-503
    Published: 2015
    Released: May 01, 2015
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Weanling male Wistar rats fed a choline-deficient diet develop acute kidney injury. Menhaden oil, which is a very important source of omega-3 fatty acids, has a notorious protective effect. The mechanism of this protection is unknown; one possibility could be that menhaden oil changes renal lipid profile, with an impact on the functions of biological membranes. The aim of this work was to study the renal lipid profile in rats fed a choline-deficient diet with menhaden oil or vegetable oil as lipids. Rats were divided into 4 groups and fed four different diets for 7 days: choline-deficient or choline-supplemented diets with corn and hydrogenated oils or menhaden oil. Serum homocysteine, vitamin B12, and folic acid were analyzed. Renal lipid profile, as well as the fatty acid composition of the three oils, was measured. Choline-deficient rats fed vegetable oils showed renal cortical necrosis. Renal omega-6 fatty acids were higher in rats fed a cholinedeficient diet and a choline-supplemented diet with vegetable oils, while renal omega-3 fatty acids were higher in rats fed a choline-deficient diet and a choline-supplemented diet with menhaden oil. Rats fed menhaden oil diets had higher levels of renal eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids. Renal myristic acid was increased in rats fed menhaden oil. The lipid renal profile varied quickly according to the type of oil present in the diet.
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  • Fatah H. Alhassan, Umer Rashid, Yun Hin Taufiq-Yap
    2015 Volume 64 Issue 5 Pages 505-514
    Published: 2015
    Released: May 01, 2015
    [Advance publication] Released: April 06, 2015
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The utilization of ferric-manganese promoted molybdenum oxide/zirconia (Fe-Mn- MoO3/ZrO2) (FMMZ) solid acid catalyst for production of biodiesel was demonstrated. FMMZ is produced through impregnation reaction followed by calcination at 600°C for 3 h. The characterization of FMMZ had been done using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), temperature programmed desorption of NH3 (TPD-NH3), transmission electron microscopy(TEM) and Brunner-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area measurement. The effect of waste cooking oil methyl esters (WCOME’s) yield on the reactions variables such as reaction temperature, catalyst loading, molar ratio of methanol/oil and reusability were also assessed. The catalyst was used to convert the waste cooking oil into corresponding methyl esters (95.6%±0.15) within 5 h at 200℃ reaction temperature, 600 rpm stirring speed, 1:25 molar ratio of oil to alcohol and 4% w/w catalyst loading. The reported catalyst was successfully recycled in six connective experiments without loss in activity. Moreover, the fuel properties of WCOME’s were also reported using ASTM D 6751 methods.
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  • Qingxin Zhou, Jie Xu, Shu Yang, Yong Xue, Ting Zhang, Jingfeng Wang, C ...
    2015 Volume 64 Issue 5 Pages 515-525
    Published: 2015
    Released: May 01, 2015
    [Advance publication] Released: April 06, 2015
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Esterified astaxanthins are used as functional nutraceuticals and pigments in many food products. Unfortunately, the utilization is currently limited due to their chemical instability and poor water-solubility. In this study, esterified astaxanthins were quantified and purified from Haematococcus pluvialis using a novel and precise approach. By HPLC-(+)APCI-MS/MS, twenty esterified astaxanthin molecular species were identified, of which classified into eight monoester forms (approximately 85%, w/w) and twelve diester forms (approximately 15%, w/w), depending on the number of fatty acids that bind thereto. The MS data showed that the predominant fatty acids in astaxanthin esters of H. pluvialis are usually a long chain fatty acid with 16~18 carbon atoms, such as C18:1, C18:2, C18:3, C18:4, C16:0, C16:1. The purity of the esterified astaxanthins was determined to be 96.8±1.2% after purification. A well water-dispersible microemulsion was fabricated using high purity esterified astaxanthins, ethyl butyrate, Tween 80 and ethanol; and that emulsion exhibited a mean particle radius around 60 nm. The chemical degradation of esterified astaxanthins was monitored under accelerated stress storage conditions. After storage for 20 days, the results indicated that the degradation of esterified astaxanthins was effectively slowed by the addition of antioxidants to the microemulsions. By investigating the dependence of the chemical degradation of the esterified astaxanthins in O/W microemulsions on the concentration of the additives, it was concluded that the effectiveness of the additives at inhibiting the degradation of the esterified astaxanthins decreased in the following order: EDTA > ascorbic acid > vitamin E acetate. The utilization of antioxidants in combination was less effective than using them individually. These results provide information for designing effective delivery systems, thereby delaying the chemical degradation of esterified astaxanthins in foods, beverages and other commercial products during long-term storage.
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Detergents and Interface Science
Biochemistry and Biotechnology
  • Mariana Macedo de Almeida, Yamara Oliveira de Souza, Sheila Cristina P ...
    2015 Volume 64 Issue 5 Pages 539-551
    Published: 2015
    Released: May 01, 2015
    [Advance publication] Released: April 06, 2015
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Synthetic supplements of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) containing 50:50 mixture of cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 CLA isomers have been commercialized in some places for reducing body fat. However the safety of this CLA mixture is controversial and in some countries the CLA usage as food supplement is not authorized. Changes in insulinemic control and serum lipids profile are potential negative effects related to consumption of CLA mixture. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of a diet containing mixture of cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 CLA on prevention of obesity risk as well as on potential side effects such as insulin resistance and dyslipidemia in Wistar rats. Thirty male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to the following dietary treatments (n=10/group), for 60 days: Normolipidic Control (NC), diet containing 4.0% soybean oil (SO); High Fat-Control (HF-C), diet containing 24.0% SO; High Fat-synthetic CLA (HF-CLA), diet containing 1.5% of an isomeric CLA mixture (Luta-CLA 60) and 22.5% SO. Luta-CLA 60 (BASF) contained nearly 60% of CLA (cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 CLA at 50:50 ratio). The HF-CLA diet contained 0.3% of each CLA isomer. HF-CLA diet had no effect on dietary intake and body composition. HF-CLA-fed rats had lower levels of PPARγ protein in retroperitoneal adipose tissue, hyperinsulinemia compared to HF-C-fed rats, hyperglycemia compared to NC-fed rats while no differences in glycemia were observed between NC and HF-C groups, increased HOMA index and higher levels of serum HDL cholesterol. Thus, feeding rats with a high fat diet containing equal parts of cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 CLA isomers had no effect on body composition and induced insulin resistance. Despite HF-CLA-fed rats had increased serum HDL cholesterol levels, caution should be taken before synthetic supplements containing cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 CLA are recommended as a nutritional strategy for weight management.
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  • Wen-Juan Zhang, Chun-Xue You, Kai Yang, Ying Wang, Yang Su, Zhu-Feng G ...
    2015 Volume 64 Issue 5 Pages 553-560
    Published: 2015
    Released: May 01, 2015
    [Advance publication] Released: April 06, 2015
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Dendranthema indicum (L.) Des Moul. is a perennial herb commonly used as a traditional Chinese medicine for a long time. In this work, we took Dendranthema indicum as a target plant and two stored insects which include Tribolium castaneum and Stegobium paniceum adults as target insects. Essential oil obtained from Dendranthema indicum was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A total of 31 components representing 92.44% of the oil were identified and the main compounds were found to be chamazulene (15.93%), β-caryophyllene (13.78%), germacrene D (9.11%), and b-cis-farnesene (6.59%). With a further isolation, three constituents were obtained from the essential oil and identified as chamazulene, β-caryophyllene and eucalyptol. Significantly, in the progress of assay, it showed that the essential oil and chamazulene exhibited stronger insecticidal and repellent activities against Stegobium paniceum than Tribolium castaneum. The results indicate that additional to its traditional use as Chinese medicinal herb, the essential oil of Dendranthema indicum aerial parts and isolated compounds have potential to be developed into natural insecticides or repellents for control of insects in stored grains.
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Chemistry and Organic Synthesis
General Subjects
  • Ryota Motooka, Atsushi Usami, Hiroshi Nakahashi, Satoshi Koutari, Sato ...
    2015 Volume 64 Issue 5 Pages 577-584
    Published: 2015
    Released: May 01, 2015
    [Advance publication] Released: April 06, 2015
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The chemical compositions of essential oils from the flower and aerial parts (i.e., leaf and branch) of Eurya japonica were determined and quantified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A total of 87 and 50 compounds were detected in the oils from the flower and aerial parts, respectively. The main compounds of the flower oil were linalool (14.0%), (9Z)-tricosene (12.0%), and nonanal (7.4%). In the oil from the aerial parts, linalool (37.7%), α-terpineol (13.5%), and geraniol (9.6%) were detected. In the oils from the flower and aerial parts, 13 and 8 aroma-active compounds were identified by GC-olfactometry (GC-O) analysis, respectively. The key aroma-active compounds of the flower oil were heptanal [fatty, green, flavor dilution (FD) = 128, odor activity value (OAV) = 346], nonanal (sweet, citrus, FD = 128, OAV = 491), and eugenol (sweet, spicy, FD = 64, OAV = 62): in the oil from the aerial parts, the key aroma-active compounds were linalool (sweet, citrus, FD = 64, OAV = 95), (E)-β-damascenone (sweet, FD = 256, OAV = 4000), and (E)-β-ionone (floral, violet, FD = 128, OAV = 120). This study revealed that nonanal and eugenol impart the sweet, citrus, and spicy odor of the flower oil, while (E)-β-damascenone and (E)-β-ionone contribute the floral and sweet odor of the oil from the aerial parts.
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  • Toshirou Ono, Atsushi Usami, Satoshi Nakaya, Hideto Shinpuku, Yasunori ...
    2015 Volume 64 Issue 5 Pages 585-594
    Published: 2015
    Released: May 01, 2015
    [Advance publication] Released: April 06, 2015
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Volatile oils obtained from both the liquid medium after incubation (MAI) and liquid medium before incubation (MBI) during the cultivation process of Lactobacillus brevis were isolated by hydrodistillation (HD) and analyzed to determine the utility of the liquid waste. The composition of the volatile oils was analyzed by capillary gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In total, 55 and 36 compounds were detected in the volatile oils from MAI (MAI oil) and MBI (MBI oil), respectively. The principle components of MAI oil were N-containing compounds, including 2,3-dimethylpyrazine (16, 37.1 %), methylpyrazine (4, 17.1 %). The important aroma-active compounds in the oils were detected by GC-Olfactometry (GC-O), and their intensity of aroma were measured by aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA). Expressly, pyrazine compounds were determined as key aroma components; in particular, 2,5-dimethylpyrazine and 2,3-dimethylpyrazine were the most primary aroma-active compound in MAI oil. These results imply that the waste medium after incubation of L. brevis may be utilized as a source of volatile oils.
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