Journal of Oleo Science
Online ISSN : 1347-3352
Print ISSN : 1345-8957
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Volume 66 , Issue 3
Showing 1-12 articles out of 12 articles from the selected issue
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Oils and Fats
  • Dedy Suhendra, Erin Ryantin Gunawan, Arista Dewi Nurita, Desy Komalasa ...
    Volume 66 (2017) Issue 3 Pages 209-215
    Released: March 01, 2017
    [Advance publication] Released: February 10, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    The synthesis of biodiesel using Terminalia cattapa L. (local language: Ketapang) kernel oil and ethanol has been conducted. The effect of variable parameters of synthesis includes reaction time (3–7 h), temperature (35–60°C), amount of enzyme (0.1–0.3 g) and substrate molar ratio (ketapang kernel oil to ethanol, 1:1–1:3) were studied. Response surface methodology based on a five-level and four-variable central composite rotatable design were used to evaluate the interactive effects of the sinthesis parameters on the percentage yield of biodiedsel. The analysis of variance shows that the optimum conditions of the synthesis reaction were at 4.03 h of reaction time, 0.25 g of weight of enzyme, 45.04°C of temperature and 1.50 of substrate molar ratio. The actual experimental yield was 83.9% under optimum condition, which compared well to the maximum predicted value of 83.71%.

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  • Moumita Ghosh, Faruk Begg, Dipak K Bhattacharyya, Nilratan Bandyopadhy ...
    Volume 66 (2017) Issue 3 Pages 217-226
    Released: March 01, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    The present study examined the nutritional properties of trans-free edible oleogels made from oil blends of rice bran and flaxseed in animal model. Oleogels were prepared by using mixture of palm stearin (PS) with cetyl laurate (CL) and palm stearin (PS) with cetyl caprylate (CC) as oleogelators. The oleogel samples were prepared with 15 weight % oleogelators (2:1 molar ratio of PS:CC or PS:CL) at 60°C with 1 hr constant stirring in blended oil. The prepared oleogel samples were subjected to DSC and XRD studies in order to evaluate their melting and crystal characteristics. Oleogel formed by using PS and CC showed the desired thermal characteristics. The peak melting temperature of the said sample was almost 44.5°C as determined by the DSC technique. The X-ray diffraction study clearly signified that the crystals were well developed. For nutritional evaluation, Male Wister rats were fed with prepared oleogel samples along with control diet for 4 weeks. Animals were divided into four groups. The control group was fed with normal stock diet containing blend of rice bran oil and flaxseed oil (4:1); one was fed with TFA rich vanaspati (TFA content is about 11.20%); experimental groups were fed with oleogel prepared by using PS:CC and oleogel prepared by using PS:CL respectively. Analysis of the blood lipid profile of the four groups was done. In vivo study established the cholesterol lowering properties of prepared oleogel samples which further enhanced the novelty of oleogel as healthy alternative of trans fat. The positive changes were more pronounced in case of rats fed with oleogel prepared with PS:CC as oleogelators. This study provides an elegant approach of producing trans-free edible quality oleogel with recognized cholesterol lowering property.

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  • Naoki Shimizu, Hannah Bersabe, Junya Ito, Shunji Kato, Ryo Towada, Tak ...
    Volume 66 (2017) Issue 3 Pages 227-234
    Released: March 01, 2017
    [Advance publication] Released: February 10, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Squalene (SQ), a main component of human sebum, is readily photooxidized by exposure to sunlight, producing six squalene monohydroperoxide (SQ-OOH) isomers. Despite its known connection to various skin conditions, few studies have sought to analyze SQ-OOH at the isomeric level. In this study, we aimed to develop a method to discriminate each SQ-OOH isomer with the use of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The six standard SQ-OOH isomers were prepared by photooxidizing SQ in the presence of rose bengal, a photosensitizer, and isolated by semipreparative high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). To purify each isomer, 2-methoxypropene, which reversibly reacts with the hydroperoxide group of SQ-OOH, was utilized. Product ion scanning was then performed on the standard SQ-OOH isomers in the absence and presence of the sodium ion. In the absence of the sodium ion, the fragmentation patterns produced by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization were similar between the isomers, whereas in the presence of the sodium ion by electrospray ionization, unique fragmentation patterns were achieved. Based on these fragment ions, HPLC-MS/MS multiple reaction monitoring analysis was conducted on a mixture of the standard SQ-OOH isomers. We achieved discrimination of SQ-OOH isomers with high selectivity and detected SQ-OOH isomers at nanogram levels. These results may improve our understanding of the effect of SQ-OOH on skin conditions as well as the mechanism behind SQ peroxidation.

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  • Satoshi Nishimura, Takuya Ohzono, Kohei Shoji, Shin Yagihara, Masafumi ...
    Volume 66 (2017) Issue 3 Pages 235-249
    Released: March 01, 2017
    [Advance publication] Released: February 10, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Interfacial tension between edible oil and saline was measured under applied electric fields to understand the electrocapillary phenomena at the edible oil/saline interfaces. The electric responses of saline droplets in edible oil were also observed microscopically to examine the relationship between the electrocapillary phenomena and interfacial polarization. When sodium oleate (SO) was added to edible oil (SO-oil), the interfacial tension between SO-oil and saline decreased. However, no decrease was observed for additive-free oil or oleic acid (OA)-added oil (OA-oil). Microscopic observations suggested that the magnitude of interfacial polarization increased in the order of additive-free oil < OA-oil < SO-oil. The difference in electrocapillary phenomena between OA- and SO-oils was closely related to the polarization magnitude. In the case of SO-oil, the decrease in interfacial tension was remarkably larger for saline (pH 5.4~5.6) than that for phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.2~7.4). However, no difference was observed between the electric responses of PBS and saline droplets in SO-oil. The difference in electrocapillary phenomena for PBS and saline could not be simply explained in terms of polarization magnitude. The ratio of ionized and non-ionized OA at the interfaces changed with the saline pH, possibly leading to the above difference.

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  • Mohd Umar Khan, Mohammad Fahimul Hassan, Abdul Rauf
    Volume 66 (2017) Issue 3 Pages 251-257
    Released: March 01, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    This paper reports the application of a simple and rapid method for the determination of trans fatty acid (TFA) content in some of the selected Indian fast food products and hydrogenated fats using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy in conjunction with second derivative procedure. FTIR spectroscopy has been successfully applied to trans measurement using the absorbance bands at or near 966 cm–1 in the FTIR spectra. It was found from the analysis that TFA content of fast food product was ranging from 1.57% to 3.83% of the total fat while for hydrogenated fats, comparatively large quantity of TFA was detected in the range of 3.31% to 4.73%. Since GC-FID is most widely used method for the determination of fatty acid (FA) composition, this method was used for the sake of comparison. Value of regression coefficient was found very close to one (0.99503) with standard deviation of 0.10247 showing a good agreement between GC-FID and proposed ATR-FTIR method.

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  • Kazuaki Yoshinaga, Junji Obi, Toshiharu Nagai, Hiroyuki Iioka, Akihiko ...
    Volume 66 (2017) Issue 3 Pages 259-268
    Released: March 01, 2017
    [Advance publication] Released: February 10, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    In the present study, the resolution parameters and correction factors (CFs) of triacylglycerol (TAG) standards were estimated by gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID) to achieve the precise quantification of the TAG composition in edible fats and oils. Forty seven TAG standards comprising capric acid, lauric acid, myristic acid, pentadecanoic acid, palmitic acid, palmitoleic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid, and/or linolenic acid were analyzed, and the CFs of these TAGs were obtained against tripentadecanoyl glycerol as the internal standard. The capillary column was Ultra ALLOY+-65 (30 m × 0.25 mm i.d., 0.10 μm thickness) and the column temperature was programmed to rise from 250°C to 360°C at 4°C/min and then hold for 25 min. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) values of the TAG standards were > 0.10 mg and > 0.32 mg per 100 mg fat and oil, respectively, except for LnLnLn, and the LOD and LOQ values of LnLnLn were 0.55 mg and 1.84 mg per 100 mg fat and oil, respectively. The CFs of TAG standards decreased with increasing total acyl carbon number and degree of desaturation of TAG molecules. Also, there were no remarkable differences in the CFs between TAG positional isomers such as 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-3-stearoyl-rac-glycerol, 1-stearoyl-2-palmitoyl-3-oleoyl-rac-glycerol, and 1-palmitoyl-2-stearoyl-3-oleoyl-rac-glycerol, which cannot be separated by GC-FID. Furthermore, this method was able to predict the CFs of heterogeneous (AAB- and ABC-type) TAGs from the CFs of homogenous (AAA-, BBB-, and CCC-type) TAGs. In addition, the TAG composition in cocoa butter, palm oil, and canola oil was determined using CFs, and the results were found to be in good agreement with those reported in the literature. Therefore, the GC-FID method using CFs can be successfully used for the quantification of TAG molecular species in natural fats and oils.

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Detergents, Surfactants, Interface and Colloid
  • Shuji Ichikawa, Yoshiro Imura, Takeshi Kawai
    Volume 66 (2017) Issue 3 Pages 269-277
    Released: March 01, 2017
    [Advance publication] Released: February 10, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    In this paper, we describe a particle preparation method that combines phase inversion of water in oil (W/O) emulsions with solidification of polymers dissolved in the emulsion droplets, induced by introducing a poor solvent, in order to prepare poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile) (SAN) particles with a relatively narrow size distribution. W/O emulsions containing SAN are prepared by adding an aqueous solution of polyvinylalcohol (PVA) as a protective colloid into a methylethylketone (MEK) solution of SAN. Sufficient addition of the aqueous solution causes the precipitation of SAN particles from MEK followed by phase inversion from W/O emulsions to oil in water (O/W) emulsions. We also demonstrate that the use of sorbitan fatty acid esters as dispersion agents is effective for controlling size and polydispersity of SAN particles. They depend strongly on the concentrations and kinds of sorbitan fatty acid esters; a low concentration of sorbitan monolaurate resulted in an average particle size of 1.2 μm with a narrow size distribution.

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  • Satoshi Watanabe, Rei Kashiwagi, Mutsuyoshi Matsumoto
    Volume 66 (2017) Issue 3 Pages 279-284
    Released: March 01, 2017
    [Advance publication] Released: February 10, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    We discuss an alternate spray-coating technique for the direct fabrication of hydroxyapatite films using metal masks, suction-type spray nozzles and two calcification solutions of calcium hydroxide and phosphoric acid aqueous solutions. Hydroxyapatite films were formed only on the hydrophobic surface of the substrates. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy showed that the spray-coated films consisted of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles. The Ca/P ratio was estimated to be about 1.26. X-ray diffraction patterns of the spray-coated films almost coincided with those of the hydroxyapatite powders, showing that the spray-coated films consisted of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles. Dot arrays of hydroxyapatite films at a diameter of 100 μm were formed by tuning the concentrations of calcium hydroxide and phosphoric acid aqueous solutions. This technique allows for the direct fabrication of the hydroxyapatite films without crystal growth process in hydroxyapatite precursors, the scaffolds of crystal growth such as biocompatibility SiO2-CaO glasses, or electrophoresis processes. By using this technique, large-area ceramic films with biocompatibility will be micropatterned with minimized material consumption, short fabrication time, and reduced equipment investments.

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Biochemistry and Biotechnology
  • Hisao Kojima, Ryota Shinohara, Saki Itonori, Masahiro Ito
    Volume 66 (2017) Issue 3 Pages 285-295
    Released: March 01, 2017
    [Advance publication] Released: February 10, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Halocynthia aurantium, an edible ascidian species belonging to Urochordata, was subjected to structural characterization of acidic glycosphingolipids to investigate these molecules in ascidians: sulfatide from Ciona intestinalis and the glucuronic acid-containing acidic glycosphingolipid from H. roretzi. Acidic glycosphingolipids containing three or five sugars were isolated from soft parts of the ascidian H. aurantium by chloroform–methanol extraction, mild-alkaline hydrolysis, precipitation with cold acetone, and subsequent column chromatography using a DEAE-Sephadex A-25 column, a Florisil column, and an Iatrobead column. The structures of these glycosphingolipids were determined by methylation studies, sugar analysis, fatty acid analysis, sphingoid analysis, mass spectrometry, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A novel glucuronic acid-containing glycosphingolipid having a rhamnose residue was identified as Rhaα1-3GlcNAcβ1-3Galβ1-4(Fucα1-3)GlcAβ1-Cer (UGL-2). This novel structure is particularly unusual given that it contains both a rhamnose residue and a reducing terminal glucuronic acid residue within a single molecule. Rhamnose is a characteristic sugar, which is a component of cell wall pectin in plants and exopolysaccharides in bacteria. Ascidians acquired the cellulose synthase gene via lateral gene transfer, and therefore, it can be speculated that they also acquired the rhamnosyltransferase gene in the same manner. We also detected Galβ1-4(Fucα1-3)GlcAβ1-Cer (UGL-1), which was already identified in another ascidian, H. roretzi.

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Chemistry and Organic Synthesis
  • Yasutaka Enomoto, Yoko Imai, Kazuo Tajima
    Volume 66 (2017) Issue 3 Pages 297-306
    Released: March 01, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    We present a method for vesicle formation from lamellar liquid crystals (LCs) using a cationic amphiphilic substance, namely 2-hydroxyethyl di(alkanol)oxyethyl methylammonium methylsulfate (DEAE). Vesicle formation from the DEAE lamellar dispersion occurred via a two-step chemical addition. This method required neither additional mechanical energy nor the use of special solvents. The transition was solubilized using an organic substance (e.g., limonene) in the lamellar DEAE LC, after which, a small amount of inorganic salt was added to the solubilized lamellar LC dispersion with gentle stirring. The viscosity of the DEAE dispersion following salt addition decreased sharply from 105 mPa·s to 102 mPa·s, and the DEAE dispersion was converted into a high fluidity liquid. Several organic substances were examined as potential solubilizates to initiate the lamellar-vesicle transition. Inorganic salts were also examined as transition triggers using various types of electrolytes; only neutral salts were effective as trigger additives. Dissociation of inorganic salts yielded anions, which inserted between the DEAE bilayer membranes and induced OH ion exchange. In addition, a number of cations simultaneously formed ion pairs with the DEAE counter ions (CH3SO4 ions). However, as the amount of solubilized organic substances in the DEAE bilayer membrane decreased over time, the vesicles were transformed into lamellar LCs once again. The DEAE states in each step were measured by monitoring the zeta potential, pH, viscosity, and by examination of scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images. A possible molecular mechanism for the lamellar-vesicle transition of DEAE was proposed.

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Essential Oils and Natural Products
  • Asgar Ebadollahi, Jalal Jalali Sendi, Mostafa Maroufpoor, Mehdi Rahimi ...
    Volume 66 (2017) Issue 3 Pages 307-314
    Released: March 01, 2017
    [Advance publication] Released: February 10, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    There is a rapid growth in the screening of plant materials for finding new bio-pesticides. In the present study, the essential oils of E. oleosa and E. torquata leaves were extracted using a Clevenger apparatus and their chemical profiles were investigated by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS). Among identified compounds, the terpenes had highest amount for both essential oils; 93.59% for E. oleosa and 97.69% for E. torquata. 1,8-Cineole (31.96%), α-pinene (15.25%) and trans-anethole (7.32%) in the essential oil of E. oleosa and 1,8-cineole (28.57%), α-pinene (15.74%) and globulol (13.11%) in the E. torquata essential oil were identified as the main components. The acaricidal activity of the essential oils of E. oleosa and E. torquata were examined using fumigation methods against the adult females of Tetranychus urticae Koch. The essential oils have potential acaricidal effects on T. urticae. The essential oil of E. oleosa with LC50 value of 2.42 µL/L air was stronger than E. torquata. A correlation between log concentration and mite mortality has been observed. Based on the results of present study, it can be stated that the essential oils of E. oleosa and E. torquata have a worthy potential in the management of T. urticae.

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General Subjects
  • Kouichi Nakagawa, Boris Epel
    Volume 66 (2017) Issue 3 Pages 315-319
    Released: March 01, 2017
    [Advance publication] Released: February 10, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    This study investigated the location and distribution of paramagnetic species in apple seeds using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and X-band (9 GHz) EPR imaging (EPRI). EPR primarily detected two paramagnetic species per measured seed. These two different radical species were assigned as stable radicals and Mn2+ species based on the g values and hyperfine components. The signal from the stable radical was noted at g ≈ 2.00 and was strong and relatively stable. The subsequent noninvasive EPRI of the radical present in each seed revealed that the stable radicals were located primarily in the seed coat, with very few radicals observed in the cotyledon of the seed. These results indicate that the stable radical species were only found within the seed coat, and few radical species were found in other seed parts.

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