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Volume 44 , Issue 3-4
Showing 1-9 articles out of 9 articles from the selected issue
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  • Juliana C. Junqueira, Maria N. G. Mancini, Yasmin R. Carvalho, Ana Lia ...
    Volume 44 (2002) Issue 3-4 Pages 117-124
    Released: March 11, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of simvastatin on guided bone regeneration in the mandibles of ovariectomized rats, and to observe their blood cholesterol levels. Seventy female rats were divided into two groups : control and treated, both groups containing normal and ovariectomized rats. A month after ovariectomy a bone defect was created in the mandible, and was covered by a polytetrafluoroethylene membrane. The treated groups received simvastatin orally for 15 or 30 days. The rats were sacrificed 15, 30 or 60 days after surgery, at which time a blood sample was extracted for blood cholesterol level analysis and the mandible was extracted for densitometric, histological and morphometric analysis. All specimens underwent analysis of variance. The ovariectomized animals had higher cholesterol levels than the treated normal animals, and no significant difference was found between the different treatment periods and the sacrifice times. The densitometric, histological and morphometric analysis showed that the treated ovariectomized animals developed more new bone than the control ovariectomized rats, but no significant difference was observed between the treatment periods. It can be concluded that the deficiency of estrogen increased the level of blood cholesterol and that the simvastatin aided new bone formation in the ovariectomized animals. (J. Oral Sci. 44, 117-124, 2002)
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  • Munire Ece Sabah
    Volume 44 (2002) Issue 3-4 Pages 125-127
    Released: March 11, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Submentovertex cephalometric analysis was used to assess the mandibular symmetry of 20 patients with Class II subdivision malocclusion and 20 controls with Class I occlusions. Using the intercondylar line and the intercondylar axis, the relative differences were measured between mandibular landmarks in both anteroposterior and transverse dimensions. Anteroposterior and transverse differences between left and right mandibular positions and the transverse position of the dental midline showed a statistically significant difference between the groups. The position of the coronoid process also differed between the two groups. We conclude that the entire mandibular dentition is rotated in Class II subdivision malocclusions. (J. Oral Sci. 44, 125-127, 2002)
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  • Mitsuhiro Ohshima, Akihiko Sakai, Yoshihiro Sawamoto, Keisuke Seki, Ko ...
    Volume 44 (2002) Issue 3-4 Pages 129-134
    Released: March 11, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) acts as a mitogen, motogen, morphogen, and anti-apoptotic factor for various kinds of epithelial cells. We previously showed that periodontal ligament and gingival fibroblasts secreted an HGF-like chemoattractant for a gingival epithelial cell line and found that the HGF content of gingival crevicular fluid was well correlated with clinical parameters and interleukin-1β level. Since HGF is secreted as an inactive form (proHGF), and converted to an active form by serine proteases such as HGF activator (HGFA), extracellular processing of proHGF is presumed to be critical in the regulation of HGF activity. To examine the role of the HGF system in epithelial invasion followed by loss of connective tissue attachment in periodontitis, mRNA expression of HGF, its receptor (c-met) and HGFA in gingival tissues was monitored. Ten gingival biopsies were obtained, and epithelium and connective tissues were separated by enzymatic digestion. The gene expression of HGF and keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) in gingival connective tissue, andc-met, HGFA and KGF receptor (KGFR) in gingival epithelial tissues was monitored using RTPCR. Furthermore, HGFA protein in the conditioned medium of cultured primary gingival epithelial cells was examined using Western blotting. All the connective tissue samples expressed KGF, and 8 out of 10 samples expressed HGF. All the epithelial samples expressed KGFR andc-met, whereas 5 out of 10 samples expressed HGFA. Protein expression of HGFA by cultured primary gingival epithelial cells was also confirmed. In terms of local production and activation of HGF in gingival tissue, these results suggest that synergistic expression of HGF in connective tissue and HGFA expression in epithelium may contribute to disease progression in periodontitis. (J. Oral Sci. 44, 129-134, 2002)
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  • Mitsuko Seki, Fumiyuki Karakama, Tetsunori Ozaki, Yoshihisa Yamashita
    Volume 44 (2002) Issue 3-4 Pages 135-139
    Released: March 11, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The improved detection of mutans streptococci (MS) in individuals was investigated using several modifications to a commercially available kit, Dentocult SM®. Significantly better detection of MS was achieved using plaque from the four approximal surfaces at two interdental spaces than with saliva (P < 0.001). Furthermore, the MS estimates for approximal surfaces at the same interdental space were similar (κ=0.654) suggesting that differentiating the two surfaces does not improve the detection of MS, and that increasing the number of interdental spaces sampled is a more effective option. This study also evaluated a modification to the standard Dentocult SM® site strip method in which two strips were incubated per broth vial so that plaque from eight interdental spaces could be tested at the same time (new method). The results were compared to those obtained when one strip was incubated per broth vial (standard method). Although the MS estimates by the new and standard methods were comparable (κ=0.721), the efficiency of MS detection was improved significantly by increasing the number of sites used for MS estimates (P = 0.01). In conclusion, MS detection at eight interdental spaces is recommended using the new Dentocult SM® method. (J. Oral Sci., 44, 135-139, 2002)
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  • Hisami Nakagawa, Hisako Hiraguchi, Hirobumi Uchida, Naoki Tanabe
    Volume 44 (2002) Issue 3-4 Pages 141-146
    Released: March 11, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The present study investigated the effect on the surface quality of resultant stone models of rinsing hydrocolloid impressions using acidic electrolyzed water. Two brands of alginate impression materials (Aroma Fine DFIII, Jeltrate Plus), an agar impression material (Ajisai) designed for agar/alginate combined impression, and dental stone (New Plastone) were used to make the test specimens. For the rinsing of impressions, acidic electrolyzed water having a pH value of 2.3, an oxidation-reduction potential of 1, 230 mV, and a residual chlorine concentration of 45.0 ppm, was prepared. Alginate, agar and agar/alginate combined impressions were rinsed using acidic electrolyzed water or tap water for 30 sec and 3 min, and as a control, these impressions were not rinsed with any water. Disk-shaped stone specimens obtained from rinsed impressions were evaluated with respect to surface roughness (Ra) and surface hardness (scratch depth), and scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations were performed. The stone specimens obtained from rinsed impressions using acidic electrolyzed water showed a surface quality equivalent to that of the stone specimens obtained from the rinsed impression using tap water. This result suggests that the use of acidic electrolyzed water for rinsing is an acceptable treatment for hydrocolloid impressions, so long as the rinsing time is from 30 sec to 3 min (J. Oral Sci. 44, 141-146, 2002)
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  • Misaki Anzai, Youichi Ishikawa, Kazue Yoshihashi, Hideharu Hirose, Min ...
    Volume 44 (2002) Issue 3-4 Pages 147-154
    Released: March 11, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The objective of this study was to synthesize a hybrid type filler composed of an organic component with inorganic component at the molecular level and to examine the properties of the filler. The composite resin was prepared by mixing synthesized filler with monomer and its physical properties were also examined. An organic-inorganic hybrid filler was synthesized by using 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (3-MPTS), methyltriethyoxysilane (MTES) and methanol silica sol. Firstly, poly3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (poly3-MPTS) was synthesized by polymerization of 3-MPTS. A gelation product was obtained by graft-polymerization of poly3-MPTS with condensed organopolysiloxane after the hydrolysis of 3-MPTS, MTES and methanol silica sol. The gelation product was dried and ground to a filler. From the results of thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), the organic-inorganic hybrid filler was found to be composed of 16.5 wt% organic component, 83.1 wt% inorganic component and 0.4 wt% residual water. A trial composite resin was prepared by mixing 55 wt% dimethacryloxyethyl 2, 2, 4-trimethylhexamethylene diurethane (UDMA), 15 wt% triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA), 30 wt% 1-fluoro-1, 3, 3, 5, 5-penta (methacryloxyethyleneoxy) cyclotriphosphazene {P3N3 (F) 1 (EMA) 5} as a base monomer and then 32.0 wt% of this monomer was mixed with 68.0 wt% of synthesized filler and a photo initiator, comphorquinone (CQ), was added. Compressive strength of the trial visible-light cured composite resin showed 397.0 MPa, and flexural strength and elastic modulus showed 142.5 MPa and 11.5 GPa, respectively. From the results, it was demonstrated that the present organic-inorganic hybrid filler at the molecular level can be used as a composite resin filler. (J. Oral Sci. 44, 147-154, 2002)
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  • Izzata Barid, Wihaskoro Sosroseno
    Volume 44 (2002) Issue 3-4 Pages 155-159
    Released: March 11, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of parachlorophenol (PCP) and camphorated parachlorophenol (CMCP) on nitric oxide (NO) production by a murine macrophage cell line, RAW264.7. The cells were incubated on plastic disks with either PCP or CMCP. Plastic adherent and nonadherent cells were subsequently stimulated with recombinant mouse IFN-γ or bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Nitric oxide (NO) levels detected from the culture supernatants were determined by the Griess reaction. The results showed that PCP and CMCP diluted at 104 but not at 10-3 suppressed NO production by both plastic adherent and nonadherent cells, suggesting that both phenolic compounds may suppress NO production by murine macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. (J. Oral Sci. 44, 155-159, 2002)
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  • Hüseyin Yazicioglu, Suat Yalug
    Volume 44 (2002) Issue 3-4 Pages 161-164
    Released: March 11, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This article describes a procedure in which the fabrication of a closed hollow obturator can be made with three sections of a denture flask by using silicone. Ease of fabrication while controlling the thickness of the hollow portion and eliminating leakage and discoloration are major advantages of this technique while minimizing laboratory and clinical appointment time. (J. Oral Sci, 44, 161-164, 2002)
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  • K.K. Siow, S.T. Ong, C.B. Lian, W.C. Ngeow
    Volume 44 (2002) Issue 3-4 Pages 165-171
    Released: March 11, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Thirty-one patients treated at the Faculty of Dentistry, University of Malaya, were assessed for their satisfaction following orthognathic surgery. The female to male ratio was 22 : 9 with an age range of 17 to 36. Almost all patients (97 %) listed appearance as one of their rationales for surgery. More males (78%) than females (59%) wanted functional improvement, while more females (91 %) than males (33 %) hoped for improvement in self-confidence. All patients reported esthetic improvement while 68% each reported improvement in mastication and self-confidence. Slightly more than half (52 %) chose esthetic improvement as the single most important factor resulting in satisfaction. Almost ninety percent of male patients claimed satisfaction with functional improvement, while 68% of those who found satisfaction in improved self-confidence were females. Eighty-seven percent rated their post-surgical changes as being well accepted by their family. The impact of these findings on the success of the surgery and the need to reinforce verbal communication with printed pamphlets are emphasized. (J. Oral Sci. 44, 165-171, 2002)
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