Shokubutsugaku Zasshi
Online ISSN : 2185-3835
Print ISSN : 0006-808X
ISSN-L : 0006-808X
Volume 80 , Issue 953
Showing 1-5 articles out of 5 articles from the selected issue
  • M. L. MAGOON, M. A. TAYYAB, R. S. SADASIVAIAH
    1967 Volume 80 Issue 953 Pages 427-439
    Published: 1967
    Released: October 31, 2006
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Salient morphological features of 11 hybrids have been studied and compared with their respective parental species. The dominance-recessive relationship between the factor pairs has also been determined in respect of the various qualitative characters. Microsporogenesis has been studied in 13 Eu-Sorghum species and 11 interspecific hybrids. The nature of chromosome pairing particularly at the pachytene stage in these hybrids has indeed been very useful in providing considerable information bearing on the presence or absence of structural changes between the chromosomes of these species. Based on the results obtained, the limitations of the existing taxonomic classification of the Eu-Sorghums are brought out. It has been suggested that the idea of lumping up of all the Eu-Sorghums into one 'comprehensive species' is not practical at this stage and at the same time, the evidence presented does not support the recognition of a large number of 'species' in the section Eu-Sorghum. The need for repatterning and rearrangement of the different species into suitable categories has also been stressed.
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  • Nobuhiko SUGANO, Kôzô HAYASHI
    1967 Volume 80 Issue 953 Pages 440-449
    Published: 1967
    Released: October 31, 2006
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In a strain of carrot aggregen*** derived by tissue culture from cambial tissue of a red, lycopene containing carrot called “Kintoki”. anthocyanin was synthesized de novo, in parallel with a simultaneous production of cinnamic acid derivatives, especially caffeic acid. On the contrary, the contents of free amino acids, malate and carotenoids were decreased down to a remarkable degree. In this case, a minor amount of auxine (IAA or 2, 4-D) plays an essential role in the production of these primary as well as secondary metabolites. In these compounds, a significant difference exsists between the aggregen and genuine root in their quantity, but not in their quality, except for the production of anthocyanin. The de novo or preponderant synthesis of phenolic compound observed in this experiment must be reduced, after all, to the modification of primary metabolic pattern prevailing in the aggregen. This was discussed in relation to the biogenesis of phenolic compounds.
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  • Tadao MATSUDA
    1967 Volume 80 Issue 953 Pages 450-458
    Published: 1967
    Released: October 31, 2006
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Accessory chromosomes were found in Aster ageratoides subsp. sugimotoi collected at Mt. Akiba, Shizuoka Pref. About 46% of the 35 clones studied had accessory chromosomes varing from 1 to 4 in number. The accessory chromosomes of this species showed variation in length and in the position of the primary constriction. These chromosomes could be classified into 7 types. Each of the accessory chromosomes, the standard, primary derivative cp and secondary derivative aS, was found to pair with each other at meiosis in PMCs. The standard accessory chromosome of this species was the longest among the accessory chromosomes and possessed a primary constriction located in the subterminal position. The other accessory chromosomes were presumed to be derivatives of the standard accessory chromosome. Differentiation among the 7 types of the accessory chromosomes is discussed (Fig. 6).
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  • Hitoshi YASUDA
    1967 Volume 80 Issue 953 Pages 459-465
    Published: 1967
    Released: October 31, 2006
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Using the method in color science, attempt was made to demonstrate the role of surface reflection in petal color of roses including the red and black cultivars: Radar, Fire King, Independence, Happiness, Karl Herbst, Christian Dior, Charles Mallerin, Josephine Bruce, Crimson Glory, and Bonne Nuit.
    Two I. S. C. C.-N. B. S. color names were determined by calculations from each spectral reflectance curve of the petals, one on the basis of the usual horizontal axis (Fig. 1, O -X) and the other on the translated horizontal axis (Fig. 1, O'-X'). The latter was regarded as the level corresponding to the reflectance by surface reflectionl'2>. From the difference in these two designations (Table 1), it follows that the effect of surface reflection on red petal color may be devided, according to the lightness Y, into the three types, as follows: (1) when Y lies within the range of 8 to 13%, surface reflection exhibits no perceptible effect ; (2) when Y is within the range of 6 to 8%, the surface reflection affects only the level of “tone”. showing a tendency to reduce the saturation in reddish color ; (3) when Y is below 6%, the reflection shows an effect on the main color level in the direction of YR→R→RP in its hue.
    Thus, the surface reflection is to be regarded as one of the essential factors in an expression of petal colors.
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  • Satoru INOUE
    1967 Volume 80 Issue 953 Pages 466-474
    Published: 1967
    Released: October 31, 2006
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This paper deals with the results of the karyological studies on fifteen species, belonging to the family Brachytheciaceae. The metaphase and heteropycnotic chromosomes in mitotic cells of gametophytes are observed. The chromosome numbers of four species, Homalothecium laevisetum, Brachythecium buchanani, B. plumosum, Bryhnia novae-angliae, are identical with the results of the previous workers, whilst those of three species, Brachythecium populeum, B. rivulare, Eurhynchium hians are different from other reports of each species. Those of the rest, eight species, are reported for the first time by the present writer. The karyotype formulae of the fifteen species are as follows: Homalothecium laevisetum……K(n)=11=V(H)+2V+J+6(4v+2j)+m(h) Paramocladium macrostegium……K(n)=11=V(H)+2V+J+6(4v+2j)+m(h) {Brachythecium buchanani……B. wichurae……} K(n)=11=V(H)+2V+J+5(3v+2j)+m(h) {B. plumosum……B. populeum……B. rivulare……}K(n)=11=V(H)+2V+J+6(4v+2j)+m(h) B. sakuraii……K(n)=12=V(H)+2V+J+7(5v+2j)+m(h) {Bryhnia novae-angliae……B. trichomitria……} K(n)=11=V(H)+V+J+7(5v+2j)+m(h) B. tenerrima……K(n)=8=V(H)+3V+J+2(v+j)+v(h) Rhynchostegium inclinatum……K(n)=22=2V(H)+2V+2J+14(10v+4j)+2m(h) R. pallidifolium……K(n)=11=V(H)+V+J+7(5v+2j)+m(h) Eurhynchium arbuscula……K(n)=10=V(H)+V+5J+5(3v+2j)+v(h) E. hians……K(n)=7=V(H)+2V+J+2(v+j)+j(h).
    The interspecific and intergeneric similarities of these karyotypes are discussed in comparison with each other.
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