Japanese Journal of Sheep Science
Online ISSN : 2186-1013
Print ISSN : 0389-1305
ISSN-L : 0389-1305
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Displaying 1-3 of 3 articles from this issue
  • Tsutomu FUJIHARA, Tomomi BAN-TOKUDA
    2011 Volume 2011 Issue 48 Pages 1-6
    Published: December 20, 2011
    Released on J-STAGE: November 29, 2022
    JOURNAL OPEN ACCESS
    The present study has been conducted to investigate the effect of dietary level of concentrate on the plasma levels of some hormones and metabolites in growing lambs. Seven male lambs weaned at 56~96 days after birth were placed in pens separately, and fed timothy hay as basal diet ad libitum and concentrate (rolled barley, molasses and wheat bran, 5 : 3 : 2 as DM base) at 0.6% (LC group : 3 lambs) and 1.2% (HC group : 4 lambs) for 5 months. The body weights of animals were measured weekly, and the blood samples were also collected just before morning feed through jugular vein every 15 days intervals throughout the experimental period. At the 4th month of experiment all the animals were separately placed in metabolism crates for conducting a digestion and metabolism trial. Average daily gain decreased a little on 1st month in LC group. The nutrient digestibility tended to increase in HC group than LC group, and the utilization of dietary nitrogen was significantly high in the former than in the latter. The plasma levels of leptin and insulin tended to increase along with their growth ; however there is no clear difference between the groups. The plasma levels of glucose and cholesterol tended to high in HC group than in LC group throughout the period. From these results, it is presumed that plasma leptin and insulin are controlled through a different manner in growing stage as compared with that in adult in sheep.
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  • Toshiyoshi ICHINOHE, Hong YAN, Naiping SONG
    2011 Volume 2011 Issue 48 Pages 7-12
    Published: December 20, 2011
    Released on J-STAGE: November 29, 2022
    JOURNAL OPEN ACCESS
    The feeding values of diets fed to Tan sheep ewes in summer season in Yanchi County, Ningxia, China, were evaluated by in vitro technique. Feed samples and information on the practical feeding regimen were obtained from 7 sheep farmers in Yanchi County, in August 2008. Feed samples obtained were corn grain, chopped corn stover, harvested weeds, harvested alfalfa and harvested Chinese liquorice (leaf and stem). By using chemical composition and in vitro gas production parameters, voluntary feed intake of the feeds, provision levels of metabolizable energy (ME) and crude protein (CP) to 35 kg of Tan sheep ewe were estimated. When voluntary forage intake is assumed to be 1.2 kg dry matter per day, ME and CP provisions were estimated to be 11.8-17.8 MJ/d and 44-235 g CP/d, respectively. It appeared that feeding a locally available forage mixture with small quantity of concentrate can replenish the mobilized body tissue during pregnant and lactation period (winter to spring) and suffice the maintenance requirement of both ME and CP of Tan sheep ewe during summer to autumn season.
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  • Kenji TSUNODA
    2011 Volume 2011 Issue 48 Pages 13-19
    Published: December 20, 2011
    Released on J-STAGE: November 29, 2022
    JOURNAL OPEN ACCESS
    In order to elucidate the phylogenetic relationship between Asian (Bengal, Kagi, Lampuchhre, Myanmar, Bhyanglung, Baruwal, and Khalkha) and European (Suffolk, Corriedale, Cheviot, and Finn) sheep breeds, clustering analysis and principal component analysis (PCA) were conducted. These methods were based on allele frequency data for six informative and polymorphic loci of blood protein and non-proteins, such as TF, ES, HB-β, XP, KE, and APOC, using different electrophoretic, immunobloting and ion-densitometric techniques. Based on NEIʼs genetic distance data, clustering analysis by the UPGMA method showed that the Asian sheep breed populations had diverged into northern (Bhyanglung, Baruwal, and Khalkha) and southern (Bengal, Kagi, Lampuchhre, Myanmar, ) Asian breed populations. Including British breed populations, all the sheep breed populations tested were broadly classified into three groups. In particular, the British group and the southern Asian group formed a large cluster. However, the Scandinavian Finn sheep was clustered in the northern Asian group and appeared to be closest to the Bhyanglung sheep, derived from Tibetan sheep. Clustering analysis by the NJ method and PCA showed similar results to those obtained by the UPGMA method. These findings, therefore, have verified that the breed populations tested are divided at least into three phylogenetic groups, but these cannot be separated completely and definitively into two groups of Asian and European sheep breed populations. This suggests that certain breeds among European sheep have a close relationship with Asian sheep breeds.
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