Journal of Physical Therapy Science
Online ISSN : 2187-5626
Print ISSN : 0915-5287
ISSN-L : 0915-5287
Volume 28 , Issue 1
January
Showing 51-64 articles out of 64 articles from the selected issue
Original Article
  • Sang-Hun Jang, Hyun-Soo Bang
    2016 Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 257-260
    Published: 2016
    Released: January 30, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    [Purpose] This study aimed to conduct thoracic and cervical mobilization in stroke patients and determine its effects on respiratory function. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-one stroke patients were studied. Subjects were divided into a control group (control group, n=11) who did not undergo thoracic and cervical joint mobilization, and an experimental group (thoracic and cervical mobilization group, n=10) who underwent thoracic and cervical joint mobilization. Forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in the first second, well-known indicators of respiratory capabilities, were measured. Peak cough flow was measured as an indicator of cough capability. [Results] After the exercise, respiratory function in the thoracic and cervical mobilization group showed statistically significant improvements demonstrated by increases in forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in the first second, and peak cough flow. [Conclusion] The findings indicate that thoracic and cervical mobilization can improve the thoracic movements of stroke patients resulting in improved pulmonary function.
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  • Sung-Joon Lim, Sung-Hyoun Cho, Gi-San Nam
    2016 Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 261-263
    Published: 2016
    Released: January 30, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the association between muscle-strengthening exercises applied to the knee extensor muscles and the maintenance of standing balance in both, the anteroposterior and mediolateral directions in patients who had undergone total knee replacement. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty patients who underwent total knee replacement with bilateral artificial joints participated in this study. During the eight-week study period, the load on the knee extensors was gradually increased, and the standing balance ability was measured by differentiating the anteroposterior and mediolateral directions both, before and after the experimental period. [Results] In both, the anteroposterior and the mediolateral directions, there were statistically significant increases after the eight-week experiment, with a 29% increase in standing balance maintenance in the anteroposterior direction and a 22% increase in the mediolateral direction. [Conclusion] In patients who underwent bilateral total knee replacement, strengthening exercises applied to the knee extensor muscles with gradually increasing load positively affected standing balance in both anteroposterior and mediolateral directions.
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  • Yong-soo Kong, Seol Park, Mi-Gyong Kweon, Ji-won Park
    2016 Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 264-268
    Published: 2016
    Released: January 30, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the effect of three different bridge exercises on internal oblique, external oblique, transverse abdominis, and erector spinae activities. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-five subjects with chronic low back pain participated in this study. The training outcome was evaluated with three different testing methods: supine bridge exercise, supine bridge on Swiss ball exercise, and prone bridge exercise. The activities of the transverse abdominis, internal oblique, external oblique, and erector spinae were measured using surface electromyography. [Results] There were significant differences in the internal oblique, external oblique, and erector spinae according to the three kinds of bridging exercises. The internal oblique, external oblique and transverse abdominis activities were highest in the prone bridge exercise, followed by those in the supine bridge on Swiss ball exercise, and supine bridge exercises. The activity of erector spine was highest in the supine bridge on Swiss ball exercise followed by the supine bridge exercise and prone bridge exercise. [Conclusion] These results suggest that prone bridge exercise is more effective than conventional supine bridge exercise and supine bridge on Swiss ball in increasing trunk muscle activity of chronic low back pain patients.
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  • Jin Young Kim, Kwang Il Kwag
    2016 Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 269-273
    Published: 2016
    Released: January 30, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical effects of deep cervical flexor (DCF) muscles exercise on pain, Neck Disability Index (NDI), and neck and shoulder postures in patients with chronic neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-eight patients with chronic neck pain were randomly assigned into either the general strengthening exercise (GSE) group or the DCF activation group as control and experimental groups, respectively. All exercises were performed three times per week over 4 weeks. NDI and numeric rating scale (NRS) score for pain were determined and radiological assessment of neck-shoulder postures (head tilt angle [HTA], neck flexion angle [NFA], and forward shoulder angle [FSA]) was performed before (baseline), 4 weeks after, and 8 weeks after exercise in order to directly compare the exercise effects between the groups. [Results] In the DCF group, the NDI, NRS score, and neck-shoulder postures (analyzed by uisng HTA, NFA, and FSA) were significantly improved. [Conclusion] DCF activation exercise was effective to alleviate pain, recover functions, and correct forward head posture in the patients with neck pain. Hence, it might be recommended in the rehabilitation of patients with chronic neck pain.
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  • Joon-Hee Lee
    2016 Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 274-277
    Published: 2016
    Released: January 30, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    [Purpose] To determine the effects of forward head posture on static and dynamic balance control. [Subjects and Methods] This study included 30 participants who were included into a forward head posture group (n = 14) and a control group (n = 16) according to their craniovertebral angles. Static balance control was assessed according to center of gravity sway velocity and total sway distance using an automatic balance calibration system. Dynamic balance control was assessed using the diagnosis mode of a body-tilt training and measurement system. [Results] Sway velocities on a hard surface with eyes open and closed and those on an unstable sponge surface with eyes closed were significantly higher in the forward head posture group than in the control group. Furthermore, on both the hard and sponge surfaces in the eyes open and closed conditions, total sway distances were significantly higher in the forward head posture group than in the control group. Results of dynamic balance control were not significantly different between groups. [Conclusion] Forward head posture has a greater effect on static balance control than on dynamic balance control.
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  • Won-gyu Yoo
    2016 Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 278-279
    Published: 2016
    Released: January 30, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    [Purpose] The primary aim of this study was to determine the effect of shoulder flexion angle and exercise resistance on the serratus anterior muscle during dynamic hug exercise. [Subjects] Ten men aged 22–32 years were recruited. [Methods] The subjects performed dynamic hug exercise at different shoulder flexion angles and under resistance weight conditions. Serratus anterior muscle activities were measured by using the surface electromyographic system during the dynamic hug exercises. After performing the exercise, each subject described the exercise intensity by using the Borg rating of perceived exertion (RPE) scale. [Results] The normalized serratus anterior muscle activity increased significantly in the order of Conditions 1 and 4 < Condition 3 < Condition 2. The Borg RPE scale increased significantly in the order of Condition 1 < Condition 2 < Condition 3 < Condition 4. [Conclusion] The results suggest that dynamic hug exercise with the use of a multi-air-cushion biofeedback device is an effective scapular stability exercise.
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  • Tomonori Sawada, Nobuhiro Kito, Masaki Yukimune, Kazuki Tokuda, Kenji ...
    2016 Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 280-285
    Published: 2016
    Released: January 30, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    [Purpose] Lateral wedge insoles reduce the peak external knee adduction moment and are advocated for patients with knee osteoarthritis. However, some patients demonstrate adverse biomechanical effects with treatment. In this study, we examined the immediate effects of lateral and medial wedge insoles under unilateral weight bearing. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty healthy young adults participated in this study. The subjects were assessed by using the foot posture index, and were divided into three groups: normal foot, pronated foot, and supinated foot groups. The knee adduction moment and knee-ground reaction force lever arm under the studied conditions were measured by using a three-dimensional motion capture system and force plates. [Results] In the normal and pronated groups, the change in knee adduction moment significantly decreased under the lateral wedge insole condition compared with the medial wedge insole condition. In the normal group, the change in the knee-ground reaction force lever arm also significantly decreased under the lateral wedge insole condition than under the medial wedge insole condition. [Conclusion] Lateral wedge insoles significantly reduced the knee adduction moment and knee-ground reaction force lever arm during unilateral weight bearing in subjects with normal feet, and the biomechanical effects varied according to individual foot alignment.
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  • Bee-Oh Lim, David O’Sullivan, Bum-Gwon Choi, Mi-Young Kim
    2016 Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 286-292
    Published: 2016
    Released: January 30, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the gait pattern of children with autism by using a gait analysis system. [Subjects] Thirty children were selected for this study: 15 with autism (age, 11.2 ± 2.8 years; weight, 48.1 ± 14.1 kg; height, 1.51 ± 0.11 m) and 15 healthy age-matched controls (age, 11.0 ± 2.9 years; weight, 43.6 ± 10 kg; height, 1.51 ± 0.011 m). [Methods] All participants walked three times on the GAITRite® system while their plantar pressure was being recorded. [Results] The results showed a reduction in cadence, gait velocity, and step length, and an increase in step width in children with autism. Plantar pressure variables highlight the differences between the active pressure areas, especially in the hindfoot of children with autism. [Conclusion] The results suggest that children with autism have an abnormal gait compared with that of age-matched controls, and thus they need extra attention to correct these abnormal gait patterns.
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  • Ganeswara Rao Melam, Adel A Alhusaini, Syamala Buragadda, Taranpreet K ...
    2016 Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 293-297
    Published: 2016
    Released: January 30, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    [Purpose] Lack of physical activity and an uncontrolled diet cause excessive weight gain, which leads to obesity and other metabolic disorders. Studies have indicated that brisk walking and aerobics are the best methods for controlling and reducing weight and body mass composition. [Subjects and Methods] In this study, 45 overweight women were enrolled and divided into 3 groups. Women not involved in brisk walking or aerobics were included in group A (n = 15) as control subjects; women involved in brisk walking were in group B (n = 15); and those involved in aerobics were in group C (n = 15). [Results] This program was carried out 5 days/week for 10 weeks. Pre- and post-measurements of body mass index, waist and hip circumference, and skinfold thickness of the abdomen, subscapular area, biceps, and triceps were recorded for the women in all 3 groups. All values decreased in women who participated in brisk walking and aerobics for 10 weeks. [Conclusion] These results indicate that aerobics with diet therapy is a more effective intervention program for controlling and reducing body mass index and skinfold thickness than brisk walking with diet therapy in North Indian women.
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  • Nursen İlçin, Barış Gürpınar, Deniz Bayraktar, Sema Savcı, Pınar Çetin ...
    2016 Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 298-303
    Published: 2016
    Released: January 30, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    [Purpose] This study describes the cultural adaptation, validation, and reliability of the Turkish version of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. [Methods] The validity of the Turkish version of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale was assessed by evaluating data quality (missing data and floor and ceiling effects), principal components analysis, internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha), and construct validity (Spearman’s rho). Reproducibility analyses included standard measurement error, minimum detectable change, limits of agreement, and intraclass correlation coefficients. [Results] Sixty-four adult patients with ankylosing spondylitis with a mean age of 42.2 years completed the study. Factor analysis revealed that all questionnaire items could be grouped into two factors. Excellent internal consistency was found, with a Chronbach’s alpha value of 0.95. Reliability analyses showed an intraclass correlation coefficient (95% confidence interval) of 0.96 for the total score. There was a low correlation coefficient between the Turkish version of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale and body mass index, pain levels at rest and during activity, health-related quality of life, and fear and avoidance behaviors. [Conclusion] The results of this study indicate that the Turkish version of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale is a valid and reliable clinical and research tool for patients with ankylosing spondylitis.
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Review
  • Youngju Park, Moonyoung Chang
    2016 Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 304-308
    Published: 2016
    Released: January 30, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to find evidence for the effectiveness of rehabilitation for pain relief in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. [Subjects and Methods] A systematic review was conducted of MEDLINE, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and OVID, for studies published from July 2005 to July 2015. We extracted data regarding patients, intervention, comparison, and outcomes, and assessed the methodological quality of the data. [Results] Nine randomized controlled trials comparing the effects of pain relief in patients with rheumatoid arthritis were found. [Conclusion] Physical therapy and occupational therapy can reduce pain in rheumatoid arthritis.
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Case Study
  • Sang-Hyun Moon, Jung-A Boo, Si-Eun Park
    2016 Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 309-313
    Published: 2016
    Released: January 30, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of ankle plantar flexors stretching with closed kinetic chain (CKC) in hemiplegia patients. [Methods] This study used a reversal design (A-B-A’) for a stroke with hemiplagia. The intervention program consisted of 30 min sessions, once a day, for 15 days. The subjects were trained for 15 sessions in total. Pelvic movements (anterior ·posterior tilting, elevation, depression, forward·backward rotation) during walking and gait speed were measured in hemiplegia patients. [Results] Overall, the angle of pelvic movements was increased in Treatment and, Baseline II compared with Baseline I. The gait speed was maximally increased in Baseline II, followed by Treatment and Baseline I. [Conclusion] These results suggest that ankle plantar flexors stretching with closed kinetic chain had a positive effect on pelvic movements and gait speed in hemiplegia patients. Also, after treatment, its effect on gait of hemiplegia patients was maintained.
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  • Won-Gyu Yoo
    2016 Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 314-315
    Published: 2016
    Released: January 30, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    [Purpose] This study developed heel support banding (HSB) using an elastic band for flexible heel support and investigated its effect on chronic Achilles tendon pain of a mountaineer. [Subject] A 40-year-old male mountaineer with chronic Achilles tendon pain [Methods] Ankle dorsiflexion and plantar flexion angles, VISA-A questionnaire, load-induced pain, total pain threshold and tenderness at 3 kg of pressure were measured before and after applying HSB. [Results] After one month of applying HSB, the dorsiflexion and plantar flexion angles increased; the VISA-A questionnaire score increased; the load-induced pain assessment score decreased; the pain threshold increased; and tenderness at 3 kg decreased. [Conclusion] These results indicate that HSB use improves ankle range of motion, decreases pressure and pain, and could provide a new approach for effective intervention and management of chronic Achilles tendon pain.
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  • JuHyung Park
    2016 Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 316-318
    Published: 2016
    Released: January 30, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effects of task-oriented training on upper extremity function and performance of daily activities in chronic stroke patients with impaired cognition. [Subjects and Methods] In this study, 2 chronic hemiplegic stroke patients underwent task-oriented training. The training was conducted once a day for 30 minutes, 5 times/week, for 2 weeks. The patients were evaluated 3 times before and after the task-oriented training. Changes in upper extremity function were assessed using the manual function test, and changes in the ability to carry out daily activities were assessed using the functional independence measure. [Results] The patients showed improvement in both the upper extremity function and ability to perform daily activities after task-oriented training. [Conclusion] Task-oriented training was proven effective in improving upper extremity function and ability to perform daily activities in chronic hemiplegic stroke patients with impaired cognition.
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