Journal of Regional Fisheries
Online ISSN : 2435-712X
Print ISSN : 1342-7857
Volume 51 , Issue 2
Showing 1-4 articles out of 4 articles from the selected issue
Scholary Papers
  • A Case Study of Taiji-cho in Wakayama Pref.
    Megumi IMAGAWA
    2011 Volume 51 Issue 2 Pages 1-20
    Published: February 01, 2011
    Released: December 04, 2020
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS

    The people’s livelihood in Taiji-cho has depended on the distant ocean fishing as the Antarctic Ocean Whaling, the Tuna Longline Fishing for long time. But these fishing, especially, the Antarctic Ocean Whaling were stopped by “Moratorium on Commercial Whaling”. And the catch of the tuna by Longline Fishing have become decreasing, too. So their livelihood faced to the difficult situation, and many young aged villagers left from Taiji-cho. As a result, the old aged fishermen have increased more and more in this fishing village.

    But, now, we can look at young and middle aged fishermen in Taiji-cho, because some young and middle aged fishermen have returned in this fishing village. They could get their own job opportunities in there. There are several kinds of job opportunities in Taiji-cho; the Set-Net Fisheries Cooperative Organization based community, the Dolphin Drive Fishing, the Peal Cultural Cooperative Organization, etc. They could get the average income per a Japanese worker by these job opportunities.

    In this article, we study on how to consist of connecting of their fishing and other job in a year, and we would like to obvious on the conditions for keeping the number of young and middle aged fishermen in the fishing village for returning immigrants.

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  • Focusing on the Sale Strategy of the Companies
    Akiko OTOMI, Mizuho KUGA, Masaaki SANO
    2011 Volume 51 Issue 2 Pages 21-44
    Published: February 01, 2011
    Released: December 04, 2020
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS

    This study aims to clarify how the soup stock processing company uses dried bonitos as materials for soup stock and to grasp changing needs of the dried bonitos, focusing on the sale strategy of the companies. The company A is chosen as an analytical example, because it is a leader of the soup stock industry.

    It was found from the result that, firstly, the soy sauce company is the leader of the soup stock industry, which was able to achieve economics of scale and maintain cost competitiveness. Secondly, the company A requires lower prices, large scale production, and meeting the specification to effectively produce the dried bonito as the materials for soup stock. Thirdly, at the producing area of dried bonitos, the large-scale dried bonito processing companies who are able to meet these demands are selected by the soup stock processing company, and the relationship between the soup stock processing company and the dried bonito processing company is stiffly-connected.

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  • Through the Analysis of Fisherman’s Diary in the 1920’s
    Keishi HAYASHI
    2011 Volume 51 Issue 2 Pages 45-68
    Published: February 01, 2011
    Released: December 04, 2020
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS

    This text adds a material supplementation to the operation realities of establishment period about the Deep-sea Skipjack fishery in Kagoshima Prefecture. The following was clarified through the analysis of the diary of the fisherman recorded in 1920’s. In the development of the Skipjack fishery, a technical improvement over the live bite had an indeed big meaning as well as the development of the ship. A new occupational category and the workman who made the procurement of bite a specialty were born along with it, too. Consequently, it is guessed that the change over the above-mentioned fish feed greatly changed the fishery management system and the utility value of the fishing ground in the object region.

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  • Focusing on Negotiations over Fishing Regulations during the Pacific War
    Manako OGAWA
    2011 Volume 51 Issue 2 Pages 69-89
    Published: February 01, 2011
    Released: December 04, 2020
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS

    This essay examines the process of Japanese exclusion from commercial fishing in Hawai'i before the end of the Pacific War. As the U.S.-Japan relations deteriorated after the late 1930s, the federal government and the U.S. Navy heightened their suspicion that Japanese fishermen were acting for the expanding Japanese empire and imposed various regulations on fishing operations. After the Pearl Harbor attack, the Office of the Military Governor in Hawai'i banned fishing and excluded Japanese from Hawaiian waters. In the meantime, local fisheries agencies worked for the reconstruction of fishing. Through negotiations with the Office of the Military Governor, they promoted deregulation of fishing activities and paved the way for the post-war prosperity of Japanese fishing in Hawai'i.

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