The Journal of The Japan Society for New Zealand Studies
Online ISSN : 2432-2733
Print ISSN : 1883-9304
Volume 14
Showing 1-18 articles out of 18 articles from the selected issue
  • Type: Cover
    2007 Volume 14 Pages Cover1-
    Published: June 16, 2007
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Cover
    2007 Volume 14 Pages Cover2-
    Published: June 16, 2007
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Teruo HATATO
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 14 Pages 1-
    Published: June 16, 2007
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Charles Johnston, Kay Switzer
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 14 Pages 2-17
    Published: June 16, 2007
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    We propose that hosting mega-events produces winners and losers in the destination's business community, particularly among tourism and leisure businesses. This 'micro' reality is obscured by economic impact studies, which produce 'macro' regional results. We discuss this with respect to Auckland's (New Zealand) experience hosting of the 1999-2000 Americas Cup yacht race. We first overview academic literature from a winners and losers perspective, noting that cities mostly win from hosting events but that the methodology for establishing the size of the winnings obscures the local-scale economic reality. Next we present a chronology of the Auckland experience in a before-during-after sequence, showing that the City mainly won. In the third section we adapt the findings of the "ofiicial" ex post economic assessment to a winners and losers perspective; this reveals tourism itself was only a middling reason for the Cup's financial success and that the implications of switching behaviour by Auckland residents were large but went unanalysed. We then present the results of our survey of tourism and leisure businesses located in downtown Auckland and several "cafe suburbs". Our results showed downtown businesses experienced small windfall profits, but the suburbs saw a transfer effect from clientele abandonment Our conclusions stress that mega-event impact analysis should be better grounded in the reality of businesses affected by the event. Our overall conclusion stresses that both 'macro' and 'micro' studies are required for planners to effectively anticipate, and prevent, losses to local businesses.
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  • Naoko Fukayama
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 14 Pages 18-25
    Published: June 16, 2007
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    The tense relation between New Zealand government and the indigenous people, Maori heightened when the controversy over the legal status of the foreshore and seabed arose in 2003 and 2004. It was triggered by the decision of the Court of Appeal in June 2003, in which the Maori tribal groups in Marlborough were entitled to take their claims of customary ownership of the foreshore and seabed to the Maori Land Court. The government was shocked at the judicial judgment and soon announced to legislate the public ownership of the foreshore and seabed. Since then the controversy had rapidly grown and come to influence even the ethnical relationship in this country. This article aims to report and discuss chronologically the political process until the legislation and reactions to it from Maori, which included not only political but also social and judicial actions. I clarify the confronting views of the government and Maori in terms of ownership, customary rights, and courts' jurisdiction over the foreshore and seabed, and conclude that these confrontations were based on the definite difference between the concept of western modern territorial sea and the concept of indigenous territory.
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  • Toshiharu Sugihara
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 14 Pages 26-39
    Published: June 16, 2007
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The aim of this paper is to explore the role and the perspectives of Maori providers for Maori people and communities in relation to the sustainability of Maori society. Maori providers are characterized by the services for Maori and by Maori in spite of the arguments on the notation of what a Maori provider is. Many of Maori providers were developed in 90's with the financial supports or funds by government agencies. The contract is not always satisfactory for them because they intend to provide holistic services to Maori people while a government fund is partial. Maori providers have been successful especially in Maori education. As a tertiary education institute in New Zealand Te Wananga o Aotearoa has become one of the largest in New Zealand. However, the expansion is so rapid that the Wananga is undoubtedly short of its capacity and a financial suspicion has arisen. Capacity building of providers is then indispensable for further development of Maori providers. Assessing their capacity themselves will be the primary step for the building. For the next stage of provider's development the association of providers will be necessitated. In terms of the sustainability of social organizations they have made a large contribution to the metabolism of Maori society by increasing vocational opportunities through educational services or health services. Moreover, the relationship of Maori people or Maori communities has become tightened by the restoration of Maori language and the awareness of identity as Maori through their services, especially educational services. In self-determining activities Maori providers must play more significant role in order to contribute to the autonomy of Maori community, and hence to the sustainability of Maori society and Maori providers.
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  • Hiroshi OGINO
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 14 Pages 40-51
    Published: June 16, 2007
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    The New Zealand jury system has various problems related to Maori, which are emblematic of concerns of the justice system as a whole. Most noteworthy in these problems has been the racial composition of the jury, and it seems that these problems come from Maori's social standing as indigenous people and minority in the New Zealand society. The purpose of this paper is to examine these problems from a historical standpoint and the racial composition of the jury, and to reconsider the significance of the jury for Maori.
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  • Junko Satoh
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 14 Pages 52-67
    Published: June 16, 2007
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    Playcentre is an early childhood education centre unique to New Zealand. It began in Wellington more than 60 years ago to rear children and support each family. Playcentre is recognized as a voluntary organization in communities. It also contributes to enliven today's society. In Japan, nuclear families have increased rapidly in recent years and people often say that Japan needs to restore mutual-aid society. The purpose of this paper is to examine the possibility of voluntary playcentre activities in Japan, using my questionnaire survey of Picasso Playcentre in Tokyo, Japan and Whataupoko Playcentre in Gisborne, New Zealand. In this paper, I would like to compare the family structure in both countries, every day lives and their own thoughts in Playcentres. This research shows the future prospects of Playcentre and early childhood education in Japan.
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  • Rachel Crump
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 14 Pages 68-74
    Published: June 16, 2007
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This paper reports on the results of cross-national, qualitative research undertaken in New Zealand and Japan for a Masters thesis entitled "Balancing Work and Family: A comparative study of working mothers in the Japan and New Zealand branches of a multinational corporation". The research examined the work-family interface in the lives of women working in the Japan and New Zealand branches of Impac, a global multinational corporation.
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  • Mitsuru Shinozaki
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 14 Pages 75-81
    Published: June 16, 2007
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This presentation will be based on my master's thesis. I interviewed 30 retirees who migrated to NZ from Japan or live in NZ seasonally. Lately there has been a growing interest in living abroad on a long-term basis or migrating to a foreign country as a post-retirement option. This study will examine international amenity-oriented retirement migration of Japanese. The findings on the personal backgrounds are presented focusing on the following aspects^ life course, socio-economic factors, kinship, and daily life. Life course characteristics : The single most important characteristic I found in my informants was that the husband had work experience overseas, either as an expatriate or on short-term business trips. Among my informants, almost all, either as a couple or the husband exclusively, had extensive overseas experience. In addition, about half of them had spent time in New Zealand during their careers. While in New Zealand as workers they had acquired infrastructure for daily life such as homes, golf club membership, cars and friends that, even with the passage of time, made it easier for them to adjust and lead fulfilling lives in New Zealand after retirement. Socio-economic characteristics : The majority of husbands held at least a bachelor's degree and all were white-collar workers having been employed with large firms or public organizations. Having had secure employment and generous pay during their working years, these couples have an above-average retirement income derived from pensions, interest earnings and real estate. Most of the IRM couples own a home in either Japan or New Zealand and several own homes in both countries. Japanese IRM importantly characterizes this financial security. Characteristics on kinship: For the most part, IRM couples live by themselves and have either finished or been relieved of their child-rearing or parent-caring duties. For these couples, the removal of these duties means the freedom to move. Conversely, these duties are viewed as impediments to moving. There are also retirees who regard IRM as an excuse to escape from these duties. Many informants cited the loss of these responsibilities as making the decision to move overseas after retirement an easy one to make. Characteristics on lifestyle : The informants in my study can be characterized as being in good health and leading active lifestyles. The retirees all had a variety of hobbies, with golf and tennis being the most common. Two trends became apparent through examining the IRM couples' social activities. Those who have permanent residency in New Zealand and live there year-round are, in addition to their hobbies, involved in the Japanese community as well as New Zealand society, while those who come on a seasonal basis are involved only in their hobbies.
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  • Yoshinori OKADA
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 14 Pages 82-84
    Published: June 16, 2007
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Chizu Hori
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 14 Pages 85-88
    Published: June 16, 2007
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    To NZ movie lovers' delight, "New Zealand Film Festival 2006" was held in May 2006 and The World's Fastest Indian was released in February 2007. The former consisted of features such as River Queen, No.2, In My Fathers Den, Perfect Strangers and Rain along with other shorter films. Those who participated in the event were able to meet some of the directors and watch performances by Te Puia. People there really seemed to have been enjoying the NZ atmosphere of the event. The latter is based on a true story of a New Zealander Burt Munro, played by Sir Anthony Hopkins. The story is filled with Munro's various episodes of Kiwi spirit. Other recent topics with regards to NZ movies are: the release of Dororo, Mr.Whiti Ihimaera's visit to Japan, and showings of The Whale Rider at a museum in Ueno in conjunction with the exhibition of Maori treasures. I look forward to attending more NZ cultural events coming up in the future.
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  • Type: Appendix
    2007 Volume 14 Pages 89-
    Published: June 16, 2007
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2007 Volume 14 Pages 90-
    Published: June 16, 2007
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (61K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2007 Volume 14 Pages 91-
    Published: June 16, 2007
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2007 Volume 14 Pages App1-
    Published: June 16, 2007
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
  • Type: Cover
    2007 Volume 14 Pages Cover3-
    Published: June 16, 2007
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (37K)
  • Type: Cover
    2007 Volume 14 Pages Cover4-
    Published: June 16, 2007
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (37K)
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