Computer Software
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Volume 26 , Issue 1
Showing 1-12 articles out of 12 articles from the selected issue
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  • Shinichi HONIDEN
    Volume 26 (2009) Issue 1 Pages 1_1
    Released: March 27, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Hiroyuki TARUMI, Kentaro FUKUCHI, Hiroshi HOSOBE
    Volume 26 (2009) Issue 1 Pages 1_2-1_3
    Released: March 27, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Masataka GOTO, Jun OGATA
    Volume 26 (2009) Issue 1 Pages 1_4-1_24
    Released: March 27, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In this survey paper, we introduce recent studies on technologies for recognizing and understanding audio signals of music and speech. Music-related studies have progressed significantly in recent years and speechrelated studies have improved their performances over the years. Although a lot of research results related to music and speech have been presented at academic societies for interface and interaction, it was not easy for researchers outside of music and speech fields to find appropriate references and know state-of-the-art technologies for recognizing and understanding those signals. To conceive the idea for interfaces, it is important to know what is possible before knowing how to implement. This paper therefore focuses on giving an overview of various studies and introduces useful research tools and relevant academic societies.
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  • Hitomi TSUJITA, Koji TSUKADA, Itiro SIIO
    Volume 26 (2009) Issue 1 Pages 1_25-1_37
    Released: March 27, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Despite the fact that various means of communication such as mobile phones, instant messenger and e-mail are now widespread; many romantic couples separated by long distances worry about the health of their relationships. Likewise, these couples have a greater desire to feel a sense of connection, synchronization or “oneness” with their partners than traditional inter-family bonds. This paper concentrates on the use of common, day-to-day items and modifying them to communicate everyday actions while maintaining a sustained and natural usage pattern for strongly paired romantic couples. For this purpose, we propose the “SyncDecor” system, which pairs traditional appliances and allow them to remotely synchronize and provide awareness or cognizance about their partners - thereby creating a virtual “living together” feeling. We present evidence, from a 3-month long field study, where traditional appliances provided a significantly more natural, varied and sustained usage patterns which ultimately enhanced communications between the couples.
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  • Yoshinari TAKEGAWA, Tsutomu TERADA, Shojiro NISHIO
    Volume 26 (2009) Issue 1 Pages 1_38-1_50
    Released: March 27, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Musical keyboard instrument has a long history, then we have many kinds of keyboards (ex. piano, choir organ, and accordion). Since conventional keyboards cannot change their hardware configuration such as the number of keys they have, we have to carry with a too big keyboard for playing music that requires only small diapason. To solve this problem, the goal of our study is to construct UnitKeyboard, which has only 12 keys (7 white keys and 5 black keys) and connectors to dock other UnitKeyboard. We can build various kinds of keyboard configurations by connecting UnitKeyboard to others. Moreover, since UnitKeyboard has various functions such as the automatic settings considering the relationship among multiple keyboards, and we discuss applications using this framework of UnitKeyboard.
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  • Yuki IGARASHI, Takeo IGARASHI, Hiromasa SUZUKI
    Volume 26 (2009) Issue 1 Pages 1_51-1_58
    Released: March 27, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This is an interactive design system for creating knitted animals. The user designs a 3D surface model using a sketching interface. The system automatically generates a knitting pattern and then visualizes the shape of the resulting 3D animal model by applying a simple physics simulation. The user can see the resulting shape before beginning the actual knitting. The system also provides a production assistant interface for novices. The user can easily understand how to knit each stitch and what to do in each step. In a workshop for novices, we observed that even children can design their own knitted animals using our system.
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  • Satoshi KURIBAYASHI, Yusuke SAKAMOTO, Hiroya TANAKA
    Volume 26 (2009) Issue 1 Pages 1_59-1_70
    Released: March 27, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This paper introduces a creative environment for designing interactive systems with living plants. This research aims to support designing dinamic interactions and interface between humans and nature. We verify availability of plants for interactive systems through researches of related works and plant's behavior. According to the researches, we have developed an I/O device that utilize plants' systems, a monitoring software and a plant database system. As a result, we built up a platform for designing botanical interface, products that support communication between human and plants, a module unit for environmental design that visualize plants' biorhythms, media for supporting cultivation and agriculture, a music instrument for collaboration between human and plants, and an ambient display that presents digital information by manipulating plants' growth and figure. Furthermore, it describes a result of the workshop, discussions, conclusions and future works.
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  • Kazuhiro OGATA, Kokichi FUTATSUGI, Masaki NAKAMURA
    Volume 26 (2009) Issue 1 Pages 1_71-1_83
    Released: March 27, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    An example of verification of authentication protocols with CafeOBJ algebraic specification language is shown. The NSLPK authentication protocol is based on the public-key cryptosystem. Two principals can use the protocol to achieve the mutual authentication between them. The successful completion of the message exchanges specified by the protocol lets two principals share some information. The secrecy property is as follows: even when there exist malicious principals, the information is never leaked to any third parties. Described is the verification with proof score that the protocol satisfies the (nonce) secrecy property.
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  • Keishi OKAMOTO
    Volume 26 (2009) Issue 1 Pages 1_103-1_110
    Released: March 27, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Formal verification is frequently based on modal μ-calculus and its fragments. However, the number of systems and verification properties which cannot be formalized in modal μ-calculus has been increasing as they become complicated. In this paper, we present a first-order extension of modal μ-calculus in order to formalize various such systems and verification properties. We also give an axiomatization of the logic. It is necessarily incomplete for the logic because the set of all valid formulas is not recursively enumerable. Finally, in order to demonstrate that our axiomatization is practical for verification, we formalize a system and mutual exclusion for unboundedly many processes in our first-order extension, and then verify that the system satisfies the property in our axiomatization.
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  • Kenro YATAKE, Takuya KATAYAMA
    Volume 26 (2009) Issue 1 Pages 1_111-1_126
    Released: March 27, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This paper reports on an experiment to verify UML models of a firewall server using Object-Oriented model verification tool ObjectLogic. ObjectLogic enables the verification of method pre- and post-conditions and invariants in the HOL theorem prover. In the experiment, we defined the method which performs packet filtering by sequence diagrams and verified that they satisfy the requirements defined by OCL constraints in HOL. In this paper, we discuss the effectiveness of applying theorem proving to practical systems.
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  • Masanori SAKAKIBARA, Kohei SAKURAI, Seiichi KOMIYA
    Volume 26 (2009) Issue 1 Pages 1_127-1_138
    Released: March 27, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Assertions are used for unit testing in Object-Oriented Programming. With assertions, tester compares with an expected value the result of a test execution which is obtained by referring to the object containing its result in the object being tested. Therefore, there is a problem that test classes described as testing code depend strongly on the unnecessary objects which are not of concern to unit testing. In this work we developed an assertion mechanism which traverses objects automatically in order to eliminate the dependency from/to such unnecessary objects. Furthermore, we performed experiments on open source products, and confirmed that using this assertion mechanism decreases the coupling between a test class and other classes.
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  • Yuhki KAMIJIMA, Eijiro SUMII
    Volume 26 (2009) Issue 1 Pages 1_139-1_154
    Released: March 27, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    We implemented a translator from a subset of C to Java that guarantees safety. For such translation, we need to emulate C's pointer arithmetics in Java. We thus defined Java classes to represent C's pointers and memory blocks. Next, we defined translation rules which use these classes, and implemented a translator following the rules. We also need to translate integers as pointers, because they can be cast to each other in C. However, representing all integers as pointers incurs too much overhead. We therefore implemented optimizations, including a data flow analysis for translating C's integer variables (to which no pointers are assigned) to Java's integer variables. We conducted experiments with 9 benchmark programs. Without optimizations, the translated programs were 3.3–585 times slower than the original C programs. After the optimizations, those numbers improved to 1.3–5.9.
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