Journal of the Japan Veterinary Medical Association
Online ISSN : 2186-0211
Print ISSN : 0446-6454
ISSN-L : 0446-6454
Volume 13 , Issue 3
Showing 1-10 articles out of 10 articles from the selected issue
  • [in Japanese]
    1960 Volume 13 Issue 3 Pages 95-99
    Published: March 20, 1960
    Released: June 17, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • S. OGASAWARA
    1960 Volume 13 Issue 3 Pages 100-104
    Published: March 20, 1960
    Released: June 17, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    1. An apparatus was manufactured for artificial respiration with pressed oxygen. In this apparatus, the air breathed out of a tracheal tube was introduced into acan filled with 4 kg of soda-lime, through an expiration tube by the action of a respiration valve, so that carbon dioxide might be removed from the expired air. After that, the air was forced into the lung through an inspiration tube, the respiration valve, and the tracheal tube. In the course of the inspiration tube, oxygen was released, at a rate of 2 to 4 liters per minute, from a respiration bag with a capacity of 60 liters where oxygen was deposited. Pressure was given to the oxygen by pressing the respiration bag adequately with the palms. This apparatus was called the closed-cycle artificial respiration apparatus for large animal, type I.
    2. The apparatus of type II had the following points improved.(a) The opening of the respiration valve was widenld. The tracheal tube was made shorter and wider so that its dead space might be reduced (figs. 5, 6, and. 8).(b) The inspiration and expiration tubes were replaced by winding tubes one liter in capacity. The number of connecting tubes was adjusted in accordance with the size of the animal under treatment (fig. 9).(c) A safety valve for the pressure inside the lung was attached to the apparatus to prevent excessive pressure (fig.10).(d) The whole apparatus was so designed as to be separable and portable (fig. 18). A type III of the same apparatus was devised (figs. 3 and 4).
    3. An anoxic circuit, a circuit charged with anoxia, one charged with excessive oxygen, and one charged with cumulative carbon dioxide were formed by using the above-mentioned apparatus, and the dynamic phase of the physiology of respiration was studied experimentally.
    4. The apparatus of type III displayed a remarkable effect when used in thoracotomy in cattle. The author, however, intends to remodel it to a positive-and-negative-pressure type and attach an ether circuit to the apparatus so that the remodeled device may be used also for general anesthesia and for respiration aid for restoration to life.
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  • T. FUKAZAWA, M. NAKAJIMA, I. SAITO, M. OZAKI, K. SAITO, S. SUGAYA, G. ...
    1960 Volume 13 Issue 3 Pages 105-109
    Published: March 20, 1960
    Released: June 17, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    From among hogs received by the Shibaura Slaughterhouse in the metropolitan area of Tokyo during a period of from August to October, 1958, a tolal of 161 hogs were found to be affected with hog cholera. The prefecture from which infected hogs were received in the largest number was Ibaraki, which was followed by Chiba, and other prefectures in the number of affected animals shipped. Positive diagnoses were made from collective results of serological and histopathological examinations. Neither kinds nor frequencies of occurrence of pathological changes observed were contradictory in general to the descriptions made by previous authors. The frequency of occurrence of macroscopical gastro-intestinal pathological changes, however, was comparatively high.
    Salmonella detection was performed on 46 hogs infected with hog cholera. As a result, Salmonella newington was isolated from the spleen and liver of one animal. It seems to be for the first time that this organism was isolated in Japan. Besides, 3 cases of swine erysipelas and one case of hemolytic streptococcal infection were encountered when differential diagnosis was made in the course of diagnosis of hog cholera. On the other hand, detection of HVJ, or the hemagglutinating virus of Japan, was carried out on 7 animals with all negative results.
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  • S. IWATA, S. WATANABE
    1960 Volume 13 Issue 3 Pages 110-113
    Published: March 20, 1960
    Released: June 17, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In order to eradicate the intermediary host of the liver fluke, the agent PCP and copper sulfate were examined in vitro for snail-killing effect. Particularly such working conditions as temperature, time, and degree of growth of snails were compared between the two chemicals. Then fielh trials were conducted by using a method which was considered to be the most practical. The results obtained are summarized as. follows.
    1. When administered for full 24 hours at 20 to 25°C, PPC and copper sulfate killed mature snails 100 per cent at a concentration of 1 and 2ppm, respectively. The shorter the period of administration, the higher concentration was needed for effective control of snails. Besides, young snails were inferior to mature ones in resistance. The resistance of the snail seemed to be the strongest at 20 to 25°C.
    2. To obtain a snail-killing rate higher than 90 per cent by spraying the agent for 24 hours, it was sufficient to administer 1ppm of PPC and 2ppm of copper sulfate simultaneously. However, a concentration of more than 10ppm was required for either agent to display the same effect by the administration of a single agent.
    3. In the field trial, 10g of PPC and 20g of copper sulfate per 1, 000m2 were sprayed in the paddy field from which the water had been removed. After the spraying, water was introduced into the paddy field so that the field might be covered again with water at the depth of about 10cm. In this manner a snail-killing rate higher than 90 per cent was obtained without giving any ill effect on the rice cron.
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  • [in Japanese]
    1960 Volume 13 Issue 3 Pages 114-115
    Published: March 20, 1960
    Released: June 17, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1960 Volume 13 Issue 3 Pages 115
    Published: March 20, 1960
    Released: June 17, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1960 Volume 13 Issue 3 Pages 120-123
    Published: March 20, 1960
    Released: June 17, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1960 Volume 13 Issue 3 Pages 123-127
    Published: March 20, 1960
    Released: June 17, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1960 Volume 13 Issue 3 Pages 128-131
    Published: March 20, 1960
    Released: June 17, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1960 Volume 13 Issue 3 Pages 131-135
    Published: March 20, 1960
    Released: June 17, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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