Journal of the Japan Veterinary Medical Association
Online ISSN : 2186-0211
Print ISSN : 0446-6454
ISSN-L : 0446-6454
Volume 69 , Issue 8
Showing 1-5 articles out of 5 articles from the selected issue
Farm Animal Medicine and Animal Health
Small Animal Medicine
  • Hiroka UNNO, Kaoru SUZUKI
    Type: Original Article
    2016 Volume 69 Issue 8 Pages 463-467
    Published: August 20, 2016
    Released: September 20, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    This study aimed to examine the hypothermia that accompanies general anesthesia in African pygmy hedgehogs (n=5) and the occurrence of associated detrimental symptoms, as well as the effect of heat retention. For the purpose of comparison, all the hedgehogs were anesthetized under two different regimens: induction via subcutaneous injection of atropine (0.05 mg/kg), diazepam (4 mg/kg), and ketamine (50 mg/kg), followed by maintenance through the inhalation of isoflurane (2%) or induction through the inhalation of a high concentration of isoflurane gas (5%), followed by maintenance through the inhalation of a isoflurane (2%). All the hedgehogs were anesthetized, and anesthesia was maintained for 60 minutes. Without heat retention, all the hedgehogs showed clear signs of hypothermia (minimum: 29.7±0.6℃), regardless of whether they were anesthetized via injection or inhalation. Cyanosis resulting from marked cardiorespiratory depression was observed in almost all the hedgehogs. In contrast, with heat retention, all the hedgehogs experienced only a slight case of hypothermia (minimum: 32.5±0.3℃), regardless of anesthesia by injection or inhalation. The occurrence of cyanosis was greatly reduced. These findings indicate that heat retention is effective and essential in the general anesthesia of African pygmy hedgehogs.

    Download PDF (744K)
  • Mitsuhiro IRIE, Chiaki KITA, Takuo ISHIDA
    Type: Original Article
    2016 Volume 69 Issue 8 Pages 468-473
    Published: August 20, 2016
    Released: September 20, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    An epidemiological survey was conducted on neoplastic diseases in dogs and cats at 26 hospitals in Japan mainly dedicated to primary medical care. Neoplastic diseases were found in 1,902 of 19,870 dogs (9.6%) and 334 of 6,008 cats (5.6%) during the initial visit. The most common malignant diseases in dogs were mast cell tumors, lymphoma, and malignant melanoma, whereas those in cats were lymphoma, malignant mammary gland tumors, and squamous cell carcinoma.Approximately 50% of the patients with confirmed neoplasms had visited veterinary hospitals with chief complaints suggestive of a neoplastic disease.Malignant tumors tend to be observed more often in large-sized dogs and in dogs and cats of an advanced age.

    Download PDF (2033K)
Veterinary Public Health, Wildlife and Environmental Conservation
  • Hiroshi SATO, Masao KAWASE
    Type: Original Article
    2016 Volume 69 Issue 8 Pages 475-480
    Published: August 20, 2016
    Released: September 20, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Fifty-eight Salmonella Infantis isolated between 1998 and 2015 in Niigata Prefecture were classified by the PFGE pattern and microbial drug resistance profile. Of these fifty-eight strains, 32 were classified by the PFGE pattern, and 11 were classified by the antibiotic drug resistance profile. In regards to the 32 PFGE types, 3 PFGE types were further subdivided by the antibiotic drug resistance profile, and 58 strains were classified in 36 subtypes using typing combined with the PFGE pattern and the antibiotic resistance pattern. Because strains from human beings, broilers, and pigs were classified in the same subtype, it suggests that chicken and pork are potential sources of S. Infantis infection in humans. There were no strains from layers classified in the same strain subtype from humans, but some strains were identified genetically as closely related subtypes to the strains from humans. These results suggest that chicken eggs can be one source of S. Infantis infection in humans.
    Download PDF (702K)
feedback
Top