Journal of the Yamashina Institute for Ornithology
Online ISSN : 1882-0999
Print ISSN : 1348-5032
Volume 43 , Issue 2
Showing 1-13 articles out of 13 articles from the selected issue
Review
  • Satoru Anezaki
    2012 Volume 43 Issue 2 Pages 105-151
    Published: March 30, 2012
    Released: March 30, 2014
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Information collected on birds found in Kita-daito and Minami-daito Islands before World War II revealed records of 85 species, and ambiguous records of 14 species. In the two islands, local populations of the Buzzard Buteo buteo and the Wren Troglodytes troglodytes are considered to be endemic subspecies. However, the absence of information about breeding of these two species before WWII leaves open the possibility that these populations may be other subspecies. The environment of the Daito Islands has changed greatly since reclamation started in 1900, and since that time all seabirds and four species of land birds have become extinct there, and four species have become newly established. The number of the current resident species is 13, which is the same number as that just before the reclamation, which suggests that the resident avifauna may have restabilized.
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Original Articles
  • Osamu K. Mikami
    2012 Volume 43 Issue 2 Pages 153-167
    Published: March 30, 2012
    Released: March 30, 2014
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The Japanese Marsh Warbler Locustella pryeri is an endangered species in Japan. The main reason probably is the lack of suitable breeding habitats. To protect this species, we must understand what kind of habitat they use in the breeding season. Here, I surveyed their detail breeding habitat preferences at Hotokenuma wetland in Aomori Prefecture. The study was conducted at a much finer scale and over a much longer period than in previous published studies. The results show that in May, territorial males preferred areas where the old dead stems of reed Phragmites australis remained unburnt, whereas from June to July, they preferred areas covered with new reed stems of less than 2 meters in height irrespective of the presence of the old reeds. They also preferred areas covered with dense bushes and areas where water depth was less than about 10 centimeters. This species selects this narrow spectrum of vegetation, and such habitat seems to be limited in Japan. To protect this species, we have to maintain the present breeding habitats and attempt to create new habitats.
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  • Osamu K. Mikami
    2012 Volume 43 Issue 2 Pages 169-175
    Published: March 30, 2012
    Released: March 30, 2014
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Identification of suitable habitats is an important first step toward conserving grassland bird populations. Here, I investigated habitat preferences of five grassland bird species, including two endangered species, in a breeding season at Hotokenuma wetland in northeastern Japan. The five species were the Japanese marsh warbler Locustella pryeri, Oriental Reed Warbler Acrocephalus orientalis, Black-browed Reed Warbler A. bistrigiceps, Reed Bunting Emberiza schoeniclus and Japanese Reed Bunting E. yessoensis. The results showed that the Japanese Marsh Warbler, Reed Bunting and Japanese Reed Bunting preferred similar habitat: the height of the reed Phragmites australis is low and the height and density of monocotyledons or dicotyledons is high. The black-browed Reed Warbler used various habitats in the study area relatively equally, whereas the Oriental Reed Warbler preferred habitat with tall reedbeds and a high density of monocotyledons. To conserve these species, various type of grassland habitat should be preserved.
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Short Notes
  • Yutaka Sabano, Sachiko Uemur, Masayuki Kurechi
    2012 Volume 43 Issue 2 Pages 177-183
    Published: March 30, 2012
    Released: March 30, 2014
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Two individuals (A and B) of the Blue Goose morph of the Lesser Snow Goose Anser caerulescens caerulescens were observed for the first time in Japan during the 2006/2007 winter. One individual (A) was found on 19 October 2006 at Shimoike, Tsuruoka, Yamagata Prefecture in a flock of Tundra Swans Cygnus columbianus of a five-bird family. A was afterward observed in Niigata Prefecture from November 2006 to March 2007, and in central Hokkaido from March to April 2007, also among Tundra Swans. A had the typical features of an adult Blue Goose, i.e., white head and upper neck with the lower neck and all underparts dark grey. The other bird (B) was first found at Sarobetsu, Hokkaido, on 27 September 2006, and was observed until 20 October, among flocks of Middendorf's Bean Goose Anser fabalis middendorffii and White-fronted Goose Anser albifrons. B was later observed in southern Hokkaido in October 2006, and in Miyagi Prefecture in November 2006, still among Middendorf's Bean Goose and White-fronted Goose. B's features were intermediate between the two morphs, i.e., its flanks and chest as well as its head and neck were white, still within in the limits of variation for Blue Goose. Past records of blue morph Snow Geese in Japan are discussed in detail and it is concluded that the observations during 2006/2007 winter were indeed the first authentic record of the blue morph Lesser Snow Goose in Japan.
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  • Yoshiya Odaya, Masaharu Morikoshi, Hisamoto Shibata, Shinzou Sudou
    2012 Volume 43 Issue 2 Pages 184-188
    Published: March 30, 2012
    Released: March 30, 2014
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Four individuals of Matsudaira's Storm-petrel Oceanodroma matsudairae were observed in June 2010 in Sagami Bay, central Japan, where the syntype specimens were collected in May 1921. There has been no record of this species in this area since that time. This observation record may provide an important clue to reveal the migration route and fundamental ecology of this species.
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  • Yuzo Fujimaki
    2012 Volume 43 Issue 2 Pages 189-193
    Published: March 30, 2012
    Released: March 30, 2014
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The Varied Tit Parus varius was censused along one to three 2-km transects (a total of 990) situated in 879 quadrats (4.5×5 km) in Hokkaido from late April to late July, 1976–2011. Based on census results and records from the literature, Varied Tits occurred in 19% of quadrats at the southern and central parts, in 4% of the eastern part and in 5% of the northern parts, respectively. They were observed mainly in mixed and deciduous broad-leaved forests with occurrence rates (No. of transects of occurrence/No. of transects censused) of 5% and 11% respectively, and at altitudes less than 460 m.
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