Journal of the Yamashina Institute for Ornithology
Online ISSN : 1883-3659
Print ISSN : 0044-0183
Volume 1 , Issue 11
Showing 1-9 articles out of 9 articles from the selected issue
  • Yoshimaro Yamashina
    1957 Volume 1 Issue 11 Pages 427-430
    Published: December 25, 1957
    Released: November 10, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The Musashi Imperial Tomb area, situated 40km. to the west of Tokyo has a good forest cover. It was planned to propagate useful small birds for the protection of this forest. Preliminary census of bird population has been begun to obtain data to be used in more detailed study with various instrumental devise now being planned. The results will be published as the study advances, which will be made by Y. Yamashina, N. Kuroda (Yamashina Museum of Birds), T. Udagawa, M. Seki (Forestry Station, Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry), T. Royama (Forestry Section, Faculty of Agriculture, Tokyo University), and M. Uramoto (Biological Inst., Faculty of Sci., The Tokyo Metropolitan University).
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  • Haruo Takashima
    1957 Volume 1 Issue 11 Pages 431-435
    Published: December 25, 1957
    Released: November 10, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    I have already wrote about the present status in Japan of the Japanese Crested Ibis and the White Ibis. I am going to state this time on the bird, Black Stork which is also disappearing from Japan. This bird came to Japanese Islands, especially to the various parts of Kyushu, as winter visitor before Meiji Era, perhaps via Korea. However, it reduced extremely in number and at last stopped coming perhaps because of the over-catching during twenty to thirty years after the Meiji Renovation. It seems to be because of the same reason that very few cranes come out to Japan at present. However, to Arasaki, Izumi-gori, Kagoshima Prefecture which is famous for the visiting place of the White-naped Cranes and Hooded Cranes, two Black Storks come both before and after the War, and even five in a certain year, but they also do not seem to have come these several year. Somebody in Ohta-ku, Tokyo, saw one of them and shot it dead in December, 1946, and in January, 1946, there was someone who saw two of the Storks in Akuné, near Arasaki mentioned above, and this can be said to be the latest visit of the bird, and I sincerely hope it was not the last visit. This bird is called Nabe-Koh or Kuro-Koh, and both mean Black Stork in English. One of the skins of Nabe-Koh which is kept in the specimen room of our Laboratory is a juvenile female caught in Sunamura at the mouth of Nakagawa River, near Tokyo, in January, 1892.
    It was well known that there was a nesting site on the Tozanmen of Kyongsang Pukto, but it is supposed to have been destroyed by the fighting in Korea. This may have something to do with the fact that no Nabe-Koh has visited Akuné or Arasaki since.
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  • Nagahisa KURODA
    1957 Volume 1 Issue 11 Pages 436-449
    Published: December 25, 1957
    Released: November 10, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Haruo Takashima, Keizaburo Shinohara
    1957 Volume 1 Issue 11 Pages 450-457
    Published: December 25, 1957
    Released: November 10, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    While there are a few reports on myriapod fauna of Tôhoku District (the Northern Part of Honshû), there seems to be no report on myriapods of Towada District. Towada District here, is meant by the area around the big lake, Towada which measures 48km. round, spreading over Aomori and Akita Prefectures. The junior author, Shinohara, had a chance to visit the Lake and, although he could collect only five species of Diplopods and four species of Chilopods, he was lucky in founding among them two new species. Descriptions on them is stated herebelow. What is learnt as a result of consideration on generic diagnoses of Genus Kopidoiulus and Genus Ikahoiulus is also stated. We also added remarks on myriapods found in Irimizu Limestone Cave, Fukushima Prefecture.
    Epanerchodus towadaensis Shinohara sp. nov.
    Body length about 18-28mm, width of postcephalic somites 2.5-3.5mm. General color of dorsum darkish brown but legs and somites are yellowish brown. Collum semicircular.
    Carinae are more or less narrow and produced at caudal end in a short after about the sixth postcephalic plate, and more strongly produced in posterior segments.
    Tibiotarsus of gonopods of male clubbed with distal portion of it divide in two blades. Distal end of main blade is a little inflated and short bifurcated, but shorter blade rolled outside. Femuroprocess large, and horn long and slender.
    Holotype: a male (body length 25mm) obtained at Towada, Aomori Prefecture on Oct. 9, 1955. Allotype: a female (body length 28mm). Data same as above. Type specimens were collected by Shinohara and are preserved in his collection.
    Fusiulus komatsui Shinohara sp. nov.
    Body length about 17mm. Body width about 1.0mm. General colour brownish black and legs are yellow with darkish brown spots. Number of segments 48 in male. Repugnatorial pores light yellow, fixed the position behind the suture of segments.
    Setae of the first pair of legs are (1)+(3-4)+(3+5). Inner base and distal end of the second joint of the first pair of legs are areolate, and process of the knee is projected slightly. Penis bifurcate and projects over the anterior margin of coxae of the second pair of legs.
    Pregonopod of male resembles to that of F. quadratus, but inner angle of distal margin more or less like a protuberance. Postgonopod with thin blades on distal end, and outside of it with two uncertain processes but without cilia on the whole surface of gonopods.
    Holotype: a male obtained at Towada on Oct. 9, 1955 by Shinohara. The type is preserved in Shinohara's collection.
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  • 1957 Volume 1 Issue 11 Pages 457
    Published: 1957
    Released: November 10, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Tatsuo Udagawa
    1957 Volume 1 Issue 11 Pages 458-460
    Published: December 25, 1957
    Released: November 10, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The population changes of birds before and behind the opening day for hunting season were observed in the vicinity of Asakawa, a suburb of Tokyo. The results are shown in Table 1. Those of the Brown-eared Bulbul (Microcelis a. amaurotis) and Japanese Jay (Garrulus glandarius japonicus) are most remarkable as shown in Fig. I. The reason seems to be due to the gun reports.
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  • Tatsuo Udagawa
    1957 Volume 1 Issue 11 Pages 461
    Published: December 25, 1957
    Released: November 10, 2008
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    It is hitherto believed that hares (Lepus brachyurus) in Mt. Fuji and its neighbourhood do not change white in winter. But a white male was caught at Odawa, Narusawa-mura, Yamanashi Prefecture, about 1100m high above sea-level on the 30th, January 1957. As its eyes are not red and it has black spots at the tips of the ears, so there is no doubt that it is not an albino.
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  • Akiko Sato
    1957 Volume 1 Issue 11 Pages 462-465
    Published: December 25, 1957
    Released: November 10, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The inbred stock of the EM agouti mouse has offered a deviation of six new sublines each of which are characterized by coat colours as follows: agouti, dilute agouti, cinnamon, dilute cinnamon, black and albino. At first, one female albino, two male cinnamon, one dilute agouti and male and female blacks appeared in the same litter which was derived from the agouti parent. In order to separate each phenotype, cinnamon specimen was mated to albino specimen, cinnamon specimen to dilute agouti specimen, and black specimens were inbred. Two additional characters, dilute cinnamon and agouti, have appeared in the offspring of albino × cinnamon. Above six strains have been inbred in order to fix each character.
    At present, each of the characters seems to be mostly fixed, so far as the coat colour is concerned. Their genotypes are not clear, and the genetical tests have been now in progress.
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  • Susumu Muramatsu
    1957 Volume 1 Issue 11 Pages 466-471
    Published: December 25, 1957
    Released: November 10, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The present paper deals with a preliminary report of the protozoan survey carried out in the City of Hakodate and Oonuma Park (Figure 1). The survey was made during a period from April, 1957 to January, 1958. In this survey, 71 identified species and 12 non-identified species were observed (Table 1). Four population types were classified as follows: 1) foul water population, 2) clear pond-water population, 3) stagnant water population, 4) population adapted to the above three types.
    1) Population of the foul water contains the following species: Colpidium colpoda, Stylonychia steini, Stylonychia mytilus, Chilodonella cucullulus, Glaucoma scintillans, Tiarina fusus, Lacrymaria coronata, Lacrymaria olor, Oikomonas terma, Lionotus fasciola, Paramecium polycarium, Condylostoma vorticella, Condylostoma sp., Gastrostyla steini, Dileptus anser, Ceratium tripus, Spirostomum teres, Spathidium faurei, Spathidium spathula, Urostyla grandis, Loxophyllum faurei, Strobilidium gyrans and Prorodon discolor.
    2) Population of the clear pond-water contains the following species: Synura uvella, Uroglena sp., Uroglena volvox, Didinium balbiani, Phacus pyrum, Phacus pleuronectes, Dinobryon cylindricum, Dinobryon sertularia, Trachelomonas hispida, Gonium pectorale, Monas sp., Peridinium tabulatum, Peridinium willei, Peridinium sp., Ceratium cornutum, Paramecium bursaria, Difflugia sp., Difflugia oblonga, Arcella vulgaris, Centropyxis aculeata, Coleps hirtus, Euglypha acanthophora, Uroleptus longicaudatus, Uroleptus musculus, Uroleptus piscus, Nassula citrea, Tintinopsis cylindrata. Tintinnidium fluviatile, Tintinnidium spp. and Amoeba sp. (verrucosa type).
    3) Population of the stagnant water contains the following species: Colpoda cucullus, Volvox aureus, Volvox globator, Chlamydomonas angulosa, Chilomonas paramecium, Paramecium aurelia, Pandorina morum, Bodo sp. (or spp.), Amoeba proteus, Amoeba diploeidea, Amoeba sp. (limax type), Amoeba sp. (radiosa type), Eudoria elegans and Cryptomonas ovata.
    4) Population adapted to the above three types contains the following species: Frontonia leucas, Paramecium caudatum, Spirostomum ambiguum, Euglena elongata, Euglena viridis, Euglena spp., Vorticella campanula, Vorticella monilata, Vorticella spp., Didinium nasutum, Stentor igneus, Stentor polymorphus, Stentor spp., Ceratium hirundinella and Bursaria truncatella.
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