Journal of the Yamashina Institute for Ornithology
Online ISSN : 1883-3659
Print ISSN : 0044-0183
Volume 1 , Issue 3
Showing 1-8 articles out of 8 articles from the selected issue
  • Yoshimaro Yamashina
    1953 Volume 1 Issue 3 Pages 83-85
    Published: December 25, 1953
    Released: November 10, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This is the report on the broodiness in F1 and F2 chicks of the Plymouth Rock fowl observed in 1953. The broodiness in the cocks was determined by their reaction to Prolactin injections (Yamashina 1952a); that of the hens by the usual trap-nest method.
    1. The three F1 females hatched in May 1951 from the cross between a broody cock and a slightly broody hen, all showed broodiness in 1952, but in 1953 only one did and the other two did not.
    2. Five F1 females hatched in May, 1951 and nine F1 females hatched in March and April, 1952, all produced from the crosses between non-broody male and slightly-broody females, showed no broodiness in 1953.
    3. Four F1 females hatched in May 1951 and five F1 females hatched in March and April, 1952, produced from the crosses between non-broody male and non-broody females, showed no broodiness in 1953.
    4. Nine F2 females hatched in March and April, 1952 from the crosses between F1 female and F1 male, both produced from the crosses between non-broody male and non-broody females, showed no broodiness in 1953.
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  • Sajiro MAKINO
    1953 Volume 1 Issue 3 Pages 86
    Published: December 25, 1953
    Released: November 10, 2008
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  • Haruo Takashima
    1953 Volume 1 Issue 3 Pages 87-97
    Published: December 25, 1953
    Released: November 10, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This is to explain the change of animal life of our country which has taken place since old times up to the present.
    Before the Meiji era our country was small, and there were only a few savage beasts and venomous snakes. We may give as savage beasts, the Japanese Black Bear, the Japanese Wolf (died out at the end of the Meiji era), and as for the large-sized mammal, though they can not be called savage beasts, the Whit-moustached Boar, the Japanese Serow, the Japanese Deer may be mentioned. As to the venomous snakes, there was only the Japanese Pit-viper. Therefore, if the birds and beasts of large size and of splendid colour came over from foreign countries, they were enough to give a surprise to the Japanese; and animals and birds of that kind had been coming actually since very old times. But the coming of those animals and birds never threw the Japanese fauna into confusion.
    As one of the remarkable instances that men gave to the fauna a change artificially, there was in the Edo period the slaying of the Wild Boar of Tsushima. During the eras of Genroku and Hoei, the Wild Boar did men so much harm in Tsushima that Mr. Suyama, magistrate of Tsushima feudatory made a great resolution to slay them out, and succeeded after ten years' hard effort-from the 13th year of Genroku down to the 6th year of Hoei (1700-1709).
    During the Edo period, some birds and animals came over from foreign contreies or were brought into Japan from Korea, and they have been settled in our country. For example, the Korean Ringnecked Pheasant, the Korean Magpie, the Rik Kiu Grey Musk Shrew and the Bed-bug are remarkable among them.
    As stated above, the curious birds and beasts which had not been found in Japan came over frequently from abroad since old times. Especially, since the intercourse between Japan and Holland, and other countries was commenced during the Edo period, curious animals began to come over in succession from India and Malay. The Asiatic Elephant which came over in the 13th year of Kyoho (in 1728) and the One Humped Camel in the 4th year of Bunsei (in 1821) were most famous and had a great influence on Japanese culture.
    The great change Restoration, however, caused the Japanese fauna a remarkable change for forty or fifty years thereafter. In extreme cases, the tribes which spread to a great extent, such as the Yezo Wolf Canis lupus hattai in Hokkaido and the Japanese Wolf Canis lupus hodopylax in Honshu, Shikoku and Kyushu, met with the misfortune of being slayed out completely.
    Among the birds which suddenly disappeared from Japan proper after the Meiji period were large-sized ones. There are only two places now in Japan where Cranes always come over in winter. Their kinds, too, are only the Hooded Crane and the White-naped Crane. Siberian White Crane Grus leucogeranus which once came over to Japan together with those two and was not rare in Kyushu has somehow never been seen since the Meiji period. There is only one mounted specimen in Japan, but the very one does not seem to be Japanese-bred. Japanese Stork Ciconia ciconia boyciana and Japanese Crested Ibis Nipponia nippon are all but being extinct in Japan.
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  • Nagashisa KURODA
    1953 Volume 1 Issue 3 Pages 98-111
    Published: December 25, 1953
    Released: November 10, 2008
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  • Tsukasa Nakamura
    1953 Volume 1 Issue 3 Pages 112-124
    Published: December 25, 1953
    Released: November 10, 2008
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    Mitake Shôsenkyô, western part of Chichibu-Tama National Park in Yamanashi Prefecture is well known to people for its beautiful view of valley.
    The author completed a research of bird status of this district throughout the year by many years investigation. He has described the general survey of bird status. The list shown not only the coming and leaving of birds in each season, but also their distributions and breeding conditions. Tables and figures are more crearly explained in the above mentioned list.
    He concluded that Shôsenkyô has abundant numbers of migratory birds and also comparatively large numbers of valley birds, while it has no passage birds because of its geographic location.
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  • Akio Suzuki
    1953 Volume 1 Issue 3 Pages 125-126
    Published: December 25, 1953
    Released: November 10, 2008
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    In this paper the author deals with the census of the coat colors in cat populations in order to fix the relation between coat colors and the frequency of the gene of cats.
    As the artificial selection is added generally, the number of male in the sex ratio of cats is less than that of female. In this census, however, the sex ratio shows 100: 100.
    And the frequency of the gene of yellow coat color (O) shows 24.56%, and the value is less than that of Dr. Komai's obtained in other districts of Japan.
    From the result of this census, it seems to agree with the estimation that the yellow coat color appears according to the sex linked gene.
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  • Yoshimaro Yamashina, Tatsuo Udagawa
    1953 Volume 1 Issue 3 Pages 127-128
    Published: December 25, 1953
    Released: November 10, 2008
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    Coturnix d. delegorguei is, a species of the quail occurring in south-eastern Africa, imported to the United States, being close to the Japanese form, Coturnix coturnix japonica. Dr. S. Makino, Hokkaido University, fixed some embryonal gonads of C. d. delegorguei in California, U. S. A., and kindly placed them at the authors' disposal to investigate the chromosomes. The authors wish to express their thanks to Dr. Sajiro Makino for his kindness in supplying the material and for his helpful advice. Further the authors' cordial thanks are due to the kind supports given by Dr. Jean Delacour, director of County Museum, Los Angeles.
    The chromosomes were investigated in the embryonic testes. The spermatogonial metaphase shows 78 chromosomes in _??_ 2n. Morphologically the chromosomes show a distinct demarkation into a macro- and micro-group. The macro-chromosome group comprises 8 pairs, 16 in number. They are represented by aV+bV+cR+dJ+ev+fr+gr+hr. The micro-chromo-somes are 62 in number, varying in shape from short rods to spherulus.
    The chromosome of the Japanese Quail, Coturnix c. japonica were studied by Oguma (1938) and revised by Yamashina (1951). The comparison of the chromosomes between the Japanese Quail and the Harlequin Quail revealed that there is an agreement not only in the number of chromosomes but also in their morphological characters, though the length of the largest rod-shaped chromosomes varies in these two species.
    It is also noticeable that the karyotypes of these two species of Coturnix and the Chinese bamboo-pheasant (Bambusicola thoracica) are similar to the karyotype of the genus Gallus as Yamashina (1951) has already pointed out.
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  • Sajiro Makino, Kyôko Kanô, Masaaki Takahashi
    1953 Volume 1 Issue 3 Pages 129-132
    Published: December 25, 1953
    Released: November 10, 2008
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    In the inbred stock of the Wistar albinos, a strain was separated which is remarkable in casting a large litter. While the Wistar albinos generally give a litter size of 6 or a little more in this laboratory, the number of young per litter in the new strain ranges from 8 to 13, giving the average litter size of 10. The first litter cast occurs within 3 months or a little more after birth. Then they breed at all seasons of the year, and give the litter at an interval of one or a little more. The growth of the young runs well and rapidly, showing the body weight of 50gm at 30 days of age even in the largest litter containing 13 young.
    Recently, it was found that the rats of the large litter size frequently produced the tailless offspring. Attempted crosses have been made to establish the tailless strain.
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