Journal of the Yamashina Institute for Ornithology
Online ISSN : 1883-3659
Print ISSN : 0044-0183
Volume 24 , Issue 1
Showing 1-5 articles out of 5 articles from the selected issue
  • Ayumi Ishimoto
    1992 Volume 24 Issue 1 Pages 1-12
    Published: March 30, 1992
    Released: November 10, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    I recorded crown color, wing length and primary molt of adult and juvenile Black-faced Bunting Emberiza spodocephala personata in Lake Furen (45°15'N, 145°23'E) and Fukushimagata Lagoon (37°54'N, 131°15'E), Japan, from late September to early November during 1987-1989. I took records of 99 adults and 544 juveniles. Crown color of the Black-faced Bunting can be used as a reliable sexing character for adults. Male is larger than female in wing length and the primary molt is completed in adult birds. In the juveniles, there are two groups in crown color, the greenish group has longer wing length than the brownish group. Post juvenile molt is either complete, partial, or 'no molt'. Regardless of crown color, the longest primary feather is longer in molted birds than in no molted. The male juveniles have greenish crown and longer wing length, than the female which is brownish on the crown. Thus, the wing length, crown color and primary molt can be used as a set of characters in sexing of juvenile Black-faced Buntings Emberiza spodocephala personata.
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  • Keisuke Ueda
    1992 Volume 24 Issue 1 Pages 13-17
    Published: March 30, 1992
    Released: November 10, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    I analyzed the Yellow Bittern Ixobrychus sinensis foods obtained from boluses regurgitated by nestlings in 1991 at Akigase paddy field, Saitama, Japan. Main foods of the Yellow Bittern were fishes and frogs. Of all food items identified, 68% were loachs, 12% were small fishes, Motsugo, and 14% were two species of frogs. A few crayfishes and spiders were obtained. Bitterns did not select the sizes of tree frogs. The Yellow Bittern seemed an opportunistic forager.
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  • Hiroko Eda-Fujiwara, Hiroshi Okumura
    1992 Volume 24 Issue 1 Pages 18-31
    Published: March 30, 1992
    Released: November 10, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In vocal states of the budgerigar, there were two main states; the warble state (WS) and the chedelee state (CS). The vocalizations of budgerigars were recorded in various vocal states. All sound elements within a unit time (18.43s) were measured for four physical parameters (duration, interval, amplitude and the number of elements). Although some types of elements vocalized in CS were also found in WS, each state had a certain temporal pattern represented by the measured parameters. In order to train the birds (three males and two females) to mimic Japanese, three Japanese trisyllables were given to them everyday. All birds except one female mimicked model patterns and all mimicries were enmeshed in WS. Thus, the temporal pattern, except the spectral structure of the element may be important to the function of WS.
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  • Kazuhiro Eguchi, Hiromi Kubo
    1992 Volume 24 Issue 1 Pages 32-39
    Published: March 30, 1992
    Released: November 10, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The origin of the Magpie Pica pica sericea in Japan was discussed based on the historical records. There were few convincible records on the ecology of the Magpie, e. g. the distribution, habitat, breeding and feeding habits, etc., before the 16th century, whereas not a few records after the Edo era (the 17th century). Based on the records of the Magpie on the past distribution written on diaries, geographical descriptions and encyclopedias, traditions, and ordinances issued by feudal lords, it is likely that the Magpies were introduced from Korea to the southern coastal areas in Fukuoka and Saga prefectures by the feudal lords around the early 17th century.
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  • Yoshika Oniki
    1992 Volume 24 Issue 1 Pages 40-41
    Published: March 30, 1992
    Released: November 10, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Columba livia, a feral bird, feeds on rice, bread or corn, on the ground of parks and streets in Brazil but in Kyushu, Japan, they were observed foraging on green fruits on a tree of Muku-no-Ki Zoku, early in the morning.
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