Journal of the Yamashina Institute for Ornithology
Online ISSN : 1883-3659
Print ISSN : 0044-0183
Volume 3 , Issue 3
Showing 1-11 articles out of 11 articles from the selected issue
  • Yoshimaro Yamashina
    1962 Volume 3 Issue 3 Pages 135-137
    Published: December 31, 1962
    Released: November 10, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Bird-banding in Japan had been operated since 1924 until 1946 with some interesting results which were analysed by the government staff in Bird and Mammal Bureau of Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry (cf. literature). It was opened again during 1948 and 1951, but with little success.
    The new scheme was begun in 1961 under the support of Governmental budget and the center of research was placed in Yamashina Institute. Actual banding has been made by our staff and also by educated banders in 18 prefectures. This new scheme was planned based on a resolution of the Tokyo Congress of the International Council for Bird Preservation (1960), which recommended to the Asian Section the need of international research and protecticn of migratory birds in Asian area.
    I wish to express hearty thanks to the Forestry Bureau for financial support of this project.
    This paper is followed by a bibliography of the literature of Japanese bird-banding.
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  • Masanori Uramoto
    1962 Volume 3 Issue 3 Pages 138-143
    Published: December 31, 1962
    Released: November 10, 2008
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    Our Bird Ringing Scheme came into operation again after the postwar intermission (cf. Yamashina, in this issue). Although some postwar ringing and recovery data (and a few of the present Scheme) are being compiled at the Wildlife Section, Government Forest Experiment Station, Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry, most of the ringing and all of the recovery data will hereafter be gathered by, held in and compiled at the Institute.
    In this year 7 agencies worked at ringing and ringing totals were summed up to 2, 321 birds (62 spp.) (Tables 1 and 2). Recoveries reported by 31st March 1962 were 10 birds (6 spp).
    During this year 5 birds (5 spp.) ringed in abroad were reported to the Institute. These are shown in Appendix I. And a special programme for the study of Short-tailed Albatross, now endangered to extinct, was begun on Torishima, Seven Is. of Izu, from this year (Appendix 11), and 10 chicks and a non-breeding subsdult (age unknown), and also 18 chicks of Black-footed Albatross, were ringed. The rings used are those of the Fish and Wildlife Service, U. S. A. Each chick was attached a red colour ring, too.
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  • Nagahisa Kuroda
    1962 Volume 3 Issue 3 Pages 144-154
    Published: December 31, 1962
    Released: November 10, 2008
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    1. Roost distribution, feeding dispersal and density and behaviour of feeding flocks before roosting flight in the Grey Starling, Sturnus cineraceus, were studied in Kanto Plain from 1953 to 1962. This paper describes the results of some 45 winter observations. The roost distribution will be further iuvestigated.
    2. In Kanto Plain, extensive feeding range of big Koshigaya roost (about 50, 000 birds) north of Tokyo occupies 30-40km radius circle of the plain. Other smaller roosts are situated outside of this feeding range.
    3. Daytime (late afternoon observation) feeding flocks usually consisted of several to 30, sometimes 100 birds and each flock was more or less 500m apart. This spacing by small flocks should be a response to the food availability which are minute mud fauna and rather sparcely distributed larger larvae, etc.
    4. In feeding ground assembly towards evening, up to 300, rarely 500 or exceptionally 1, 000 birds gathered into a flock, the average flock size being 176 birds. Thus an area where a flock of over 150 birds was found could be regarded as a good feeding place. Evening flocks gradually moved always towards the direction of main roost (to which most of the flock members belonged). The distance of this late afternoon movement to final gathering place was usually 1.5-2.0km.
    5.The density, the economic density, of daytime feeding flocks in the field was 30-500 (average 160) birds per 1km2, therefore 0.3-5.0 (average 1.6) birds per 1 ha, which coincided with previously calculated data. This may suggest that a space of about 1 ha is wanted by one starling.
    6. Two types of feeding dispersal from a roost were noticed. In type A, the flock size decreased with greater distance along a certain direction and under similar conditions of the feeding environment (see NNW direction in the map). In type B, concentration to a certain feeding area was found. A remarkable concentration was at 40km from the roost which was about the maximum distance of feeding dispersal. On this feeding flight line, the size of feeding flocks decreased with shorter distance from the roost, i. e. greater flock size towards the concentration area. This concentration was possibly due to higher food resources plus good breeding envirnment (old trees with holes).
    7. The middle area on the B type dispersal line was apparently occupied by a big feeding flock of another roost (confirmed by roosting flight direction). If this were a competitve segregation of feeding grounds by two different roost-flocks, it is a remarkable instance.
    8. It commonly happens that at the peripheral feeding area, the feeding flocks make a joint flock with birds of other roost or roosts. Thus on starting for roosting flight they take off to different, or to each determined, directions.
    9. Distribution and observation data at eleven roosts in the study asea (see fig. 1) are described.
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  • Tôru Nakamura
    1962 Volume 3 Issue 3 Pages 155-173
    Published: December 31, 1962
    Released: November 10, 2008
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    1. Observations were made on 48 pairs, 71 nests of Aegithalos caudatus trivirgatus in Nagano, Honshiu, during the breeding seasons 1951-1961.
    2. Sexes were identified by behaviour, difference in curved and worn tail feathers and leg bands.
    3. Breeding is commenced in accordance with budding season of trees. Some begin nesting as early as in February but their nesting periods are prolonged owing to occasional cold spells than in late breeders.
    4. Pair formation precedes the nest-site selection. Pair-groups are formed by local adherance within an winter flocking area. Even after nesting is commenced, pair-groups may be re-formed by cold spell.
    5. Nests are placed in wood-edges and canopies, and the twigs, more than 10m in height, of evergreen needle-leaved trees are most often selected. In desiduous broad-leaved trees the nest is found 3-10m from the ground and in bushes below 3m.
    6. If nest is destroyed during beeding season it is renested, but towards the end of the season not.
    7. Both sexes work for nesting and total activity time is a little less than resting time. Nesting period may be as long as 2 months for some early nesters, but only about 10 days for later breeders.
    8. They roost in a bush in early nesting period but after nest-wall is completed they use it for roost.
    9. The ratio of time, non-attendance/incubation time, is nearly 1 in early nesting period and almost 2 later.
    10. Roosting in nest is first led by male but the female enters first followed by him with a certain behaviour pattern.
    11. When chicks hatched, male passes food to the female who feeds but ofter a few days both parnets feed the chicks directly.
    12. A parent fed the chick average 0.33 times per minute but a little less in early and later period.
    13. Male may lead the female for feeding but the latter feeds first, during which the male makes display behaviour and then feeds the chicks.
    14. The up-right flight display chiefly made by the male is performed at certain places during nesting seasen aod becomes restricted to the neighbourhood of the nest during egg-laying through incubation and feeding periods. Soon after the hatching this behaiour is at its peak.
    15. The territory is indistinct and only the nest is defended. The display behaviour is not used for defence of territory.
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  • Nagahisa Kuroda
    1962 Volume 3 Issue 3 Pages 174-184
    Published: December 31, 1962
    Released: November 10, 2008
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    In field study, already published, it was found that the rural Grey Starling chicks (Sturnus cineraceus) were fed primarily with mole-crickets and no vegetable matter mixed, while the city chicks were given variety of animal and vegetable foods, of which the cherries were predominant item. The growth rate of chicks under this different food supply by the parents was generally uniformly good in rural broods and somewhat more variable in those of the city zone, among which an exceptional case of inferior chick growth was included.
    This was suspected to be the result of over or exclusive feeding of cherries by the parents, since their cherry preference was variable as shown by the number of vomitted cherry stones (by chicks) left it the nest boxes.
    The present study was aimed to compare the growth rate of chicks artificially raised with animal food and cherries. As animal food, the mole-cricket was not available in sufficient number, so the basket-worms which were found abundantly enough in the garden were substituted.
    Two chicks, A (male) and B (female), of the fifth day of age were used, and during 7-10th days A was fed with basket-worms and B with cherries. As the result, the growth of B delayed and it was weakened. So, during the next four days, the foods were reversed (though A was fed first two days with artificial pasted food, the following two days with the cherries) and on the first two days the mole-crickets were given as supplemental food equally to A and B (This caused their equall acceleration of growth).
    This reverse feeding resulted in the reversal of body weights of A and B, this time B becoming heavier than A. Later they were equally fed with pasted food and nine days after A, the male, again became heavier than B, the female (thus the influence of the cherry ceased) and on the 24th day of age, the growth of the birds stopped, reaching maturity as young birds.
    These data were supported by the very low protein and nitrogen content in the cherries used in the experiment as compared with the basket-worms (Also, known nutrient analyses of edible cherries and silk-worm are cited (Table 6 and 7)).
    The body length, keel length and parts of limbs were also measured, but the influence of food change upon these was not disctinct as in the body weight and they were not reversed when food was reversed. However, longer bones seemed to be more affected than shorter bones, and the maturity (or stop) of growth was delayed in longer than shorter bones. The growth of wing quills was not affected by the subsequent change of food (after 10 days old) but the effect of initial food difference (before 10 days old) might have continued until their full growth.
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  • Tsukasa Nakamura
    1962 Volume 3 Issue 3 Pages 185-188
    Published: December 31, 1962
    Released: November 10, 2008
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    Total of 37 migratory Eastern Great Reed-warbler, Acrocephalus arundinaceus orientalis, was obtained by mist nets. Extraction of lipids was made by means of Soxhlet apparatus. Dry lipid weights and lipid indices were calculated. The result showed that rapid increase was noticed during premigration period.
    Some chemical natures on the extracted lipdis were examined. Among them, saponification value was increased from premolt period through premigration period suggesting a decrease in the mean chain length of the fatty acids or a decrease in the nonsaponifiable fruction. Mean value for saponification through the periods studied was 190 ranging from 182 to 198 in mean value of the months.
    With respect to iodine value, the highest number was found in molting period. The mean iodine value was obtained as 69 ranging from 58 to 76 suggesting some changes of unsaturated fatty acid contents of the lipid during the period studied.
    I shall reexamine the chemical observations on lipids in combination with a later work. Mean values of body weight, lipid index, acid value, saponification value and iodine value during the periods of premolt, molt and premigration are shown bellow:
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  • Nagahisa Kuroda
    1962 Volume 3 Issue 3 Pages 189-211
    Published: December 31, 1962
    Released: November 10, 2008
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    Cervical muscles in eleven Orders and nineteen species of birds were compared by semidiagramatical illustrations of the lateral view. The main series of cervical muscles studied was given the following nomenclature:
    1. Dorsal muscles
    1. Biventer muscle, M. biventer cervicalis
    2. Dorsal long cervical muscle, M. longus colli posticus (M. spinalis)
    a. Longitudinal part, pars longus b. Anterior part, pars anterior
    c. Posterior part, pars posterior d. Inferior part, pars inferior
    3. Dorsal profound cervical muscle, M. profundus colli posticus
    4. Intercrestal muscle, M. intercristalis
    II. Lateral muscles
    1. Oblique cervical muscle, M. obliquus colli
    2. Lateral cervical muscle, M. colli lateralis (M. intertransversalis)
    III. Ventral muscles
    1. Ventral long cervical muscle, M. longus colli anticus
    a. Longitudinal part, pars longus b. Anterior part, pars anterior
    c. Posterior part, pars posterior
    The development of these muscles is extremely variable both adaptively and possibly taxonomically and in some groups is very specialized. These complexities of the avian cervical muscle system are the natural result of their variety of uses of the neck in food-getting and other activities. The myology of this interesting and important part of avian body, however, has been curiously neglected and is open to future detailed comparative studies.
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  • Nagahisa Kuroda
    1962 Volume 3 Issue 3 Pages 212-217
    Published: December 31, 1962
    Released: November 10, 2008
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  • Tôdi Mishima
    1962 Volume 3 Issue 3 Pages 218-221
    Published: December 31, 1962
    Released: November 10, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    As the result of this study it is concluded that 1) Corvus levaillantii connectens Stresemann is distributed on islands, Yakushima, Amani-Oshima, Tokunoshima, Okinawa, Zamami, and Miyako, 2) The breeding range of Jynx torquilla japonica (Bonap.) covers from Sakhalin, Hokkaido to Honshiu, 3) Charadrius alexandrinus alexandrinus L. so far included in Japanese hand-list is now referred to the race nihonensis Deignan, 4) Phasianus colchicus affinis Momiyama stands for the race of Oshima of Seven Is. of Izu in place of the name tanensis.
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  • Nagahisa Kuroda
    1962 Volume 3 Issue 3 Pages 222-224
    Published: December 31, 1962
    Released: November 10, 2008
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  • N. h. Kuroda
    1962 Volume 3 Issue 3 Pages 225-226
    Published: December 31, 1962
    Released: November 10, 2008
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    On 1 Septembr 1962, a bird of this speices, Pterodroma hypoleuca, unable to fly was found and was fed with dried sardines, pork, salted salmon and salt water for five days. It recovered its spirit and flew well to the sea when released.
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