Kansenshogaku Zasshi
Online ISSN : 1884-569X
Print ISSN : 0387-5911
ISSN-L : 0387-5911
Volume 45 , Issue 12
Showing 1-5 articles out of 5 articles from the selected issue
  • Morihei KIGAWA, Katsumi HAYASHI, Kenichi TAMURA, Ichiro FUNAKI
    1971 Volume 45 Issue 12 Pages 525-531
    Published: December 20, 1971
    Released: September 07, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Two hundred fifteen strains of Staphylococcus aureus were isolated from clinical sources in the Waka yama area from 1967 to 1970. Phage typing and drug sensitivity test were carried out. One hundred thirty four phage lysates were obtained by ultraviolet irradiation and plaqueformation of each lysate was checked with the propagating strains of the International Typing Phage. Cross lysis was examined among the phage lysates and their induced strains. Results are as follows:
    1) 80, 81 complex strains which are known as “epidemic strains” were isolated from many hospitals and medical offices and occupied an overwhelming majority (81%) of typable strains in the surgery hospitals.
    2) Eighty five (63%) of 134 strains were lysogenic (phage lysates lyzed one or more of the standard propagating strains).
    Thirty six (73%) of 49 strains (80, 81 complex) and 14 (26%) of 54 strains (untypable) belonged to prophage type 80/81. Almost all of these strains were resistant to multiple drugs.
    4) At present, a few kanamycin resistant strains were isolated from otorhinological clinics: only and almost all were untypable.
    5) The results of cross lysis among the phage lysates (prophage type 80/81) and their induced strains (80, 81 complex and untypable) were fairly similar to several investigators' reports. Namely, these phages could be divided into some related phages according to the host range and some phages were akin to N. C. T. C. typing phage 81.
    6) In this study, it is suggested that the proprieties of recipient were influenced by the phage type and their lysogenicity. For instance, non-lysogenic strains (in respect of the prophage type 80/81) were most competent within the phage type 80/81 strains.
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  • Mannosuke TOMISAWA, Yoshiko HIRATA
    1971 Volume 45 Issue 12 Pages 532-537
    Published: December 20, 1971
    Released: September 07, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    It is a well known fact that Vi antigen possesses suppressive power on O hemagglutinability. So far, not a few experiments have been done by others in an effort to clarify this peculiar nature of Vi antigen.
    Along this line, we also made some experiments chiefly concerning with (1) the effect of Vi antigen on O hemagglutinability of some other species than salmonella typhosa, namely, some salmonella group except typhosa, some streptococci and klebsiella, (2) the heating effect of suspension of both V and W form salmonella typhosa (Ty2 and H901, respectively) on Vi and O hemagglutinability and (3) the heating effect of suspension of some salmonella group on O hemagglutinability.
    The followings are the summary of this report:
    (1) a. O hemagglutinability of the supernatant from the suspension (heated 1 hour at 100°C) of salmonella group such as, S. paratyphi A, S. paratyphi B, S. thompson, S. newport, and S. anatum was completely inhibited by Vi antigen (from ballerup) heated 1 hour at 60°C. (Sheep erythrocytes were used in this series)
    b. O hemagglutinability of klebsiella K and O using the supernatant from the suspension heated 1 hour at 100°C was completely inhibited by the above Vi antigen, except the case of O 4 antigen in which the suppression was not complete.
    c. Hemagglutinability of streptococcus sanguis I, II, streptococcus salivarius I, II, or K group streptococcus (using the supernetant of bacterial suspension heated 1 hour at 120°C) was also suppressed by the above Vi antigen. However, in the case of H group streptococcus or streptococcus MG the suppression was not complete.
    (2) a. The supernatants from suspension of salmonella typhosa Ty2 heated 1 hour at 58°C, 70°C, 80°C, 90°C and 100°C, respectively, showed high Vi hemagglutinability, but O hemagglutinabitity was completely inhibited in the case of heating at 58°C and 70°C. The others showed O hemagglutinability, though considerably weak. This could be interpreted as effect of rising temperature to weaken Vi antigen and increase of free O antigen.
    b. On the contrary, the supernatant of H901 strain showed no Vi hemagglutinability. O hemagglutinability was completely suppressed by the supernatant heated at 58°C, whereas, O hemagglutinability was seen high in the case of heating at 70°C and highest in the case of heating at 80°C-100°C.
    (3) Like the supernatant of H901 strain, the supernatant from suspension of salmonella paratyphi A, tompson, newport and anatum heated at 56°C-60°C showed suppression on O hemagglutinability gous antiserum. This property was destroyed at 100°C or by preserving it for several months. But only paratyphi B behaved somewhat different.
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  • [in Japanese]
    1971 Volume 45 Issue 12 Pages 538-545
    Published: December 20, 1971
    Released: September 07, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1971 Volume 45 Issue 12 Pages 546-548
    Published: December 20, 1971
    Released: September 07, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
  • 1971 Volume 45 Issue 12 Pages 549-551
    Published: December 20, 1971
    Released: September 07, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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