Japanese Journal of Health and Human Ecology
Online ISSN : 2432-6720
Print ISSN : 2432-6712
ISSN-L : 2432-6712
Current issue
Showing 1-4 articles out of 4 articles from the selected issue
Foreword
Original Articles
  • Keiko SAITO, Kazunori KAYABA, Sachiko SUZUKI, Hiroaki NOBUHARA, Michik ...
    Type: research-article
    2019 Volume 85 Issue 4 Pages 129-140
    Published: July 31, 2019
    Released: August 23, 2019
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Traditional postpartum practices play an important role for maternal health. However, few studies have focused on the recognition and implementation of traditional practices of immigrant minorities. We conducted a semi-structured interview with 10 Laotian women aged 35-58 who grew up in Laos and are now living in Japan. Survey period was from April to May 2016.

    The interview consists of six Laotian traditional postpartum practices (yu fai, kin nam hon, ap nam hon, hom ya, kalam kin, and bahsee seu khwan) based on the previous studies on pregnancy, childbirth, and postpartum traditional practices in Laos. The answers were qualitatively and descriptively analyzed for the recognition and implementation of traditional postpartum practices in Japan.

    The results showed that all interviewees recognized the six practices as important traditional customs, though some were simplified or implemented with substitute items. On the other hand, some did not implement them due to influential factors such as structure of house or family members in Japan or advice from medical staff, etc.

    In conclusion, Laotian women are intending to keep the traditional postpartum practices in Japan. The study will provide important information to maternal care for immigrant minorities in Japan.

    Download PDF (723K)
  • Riho IWASAKI, Kazuaki HIRAI, Keisuke AMINAKA
    Type: research-article
    2019 Volume 85 Issue 4 Pages 141-149
    Published: July 31, 2019
    Released: August 23, 2019
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Objective: Although population aging in Japan is an urgent concern, many older persons are healthy and do not require care. In many areas, “senior salons” have been created to allow older persons to congregate. While positive effects on health are claimed, attendance is low. In this study, we explored the potential reasons for such low attendance.

    Methods: We conducted semi-structured interviews with 14 older persons living in a Japanese rural area. Data were analyzed qualitatively.

    Results: Three themes in terms of attitudes towards the salons were identified: “I am sufficiently energetic,” “I am busy with other social activities,” and “I do not enjoy emotional connections with other people.”

    Conclusion: We also need to consider self-awareness in relation to aging when we consider elderly participation in salons. Furthermore, when examining elderly people’s interactions with others, it is important to consider not only senior salons, but also take into account their overall “social participation,” including hobbies, work, and volunteer activities.

    Download PDF (650K)
feedback
Top