Igaku Kyoiku / Medical Education (Japan)
Online ISSN : 2185-0453
Print ISSN : 0386-9644
ISSN-L : 0386-9644
Volume 47 , Issue 6
Showing 1-9 articles out of 9 articles from the selected issue
Short reports
  • Hiroyuki Ichijo, Tomoya Nakamura, Yuichi Takeuchi, Masahumi Kawaguchi
    2016 Volume 47 Issue 6 Pages 343-351
    Published: December 25, 2016
    Released: August 10, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

     Students always have many questions and problems during active participation. Here, we report an active learning course (AL) based on problems that medical students encountered in gross anatomy practice. This AL was implemented after the practice, consisting of a lecture, group discussions, resource hours, and presentation session to ensure exploratory learning. Based on a questionnaire survey, 75.1% of the students evaluated the AL as very valuable or valuable, indicating its usefulness. The AL not only complemented the anatomy course, but also directed the students toward other forms of basic and clinical learning. The results indicate that by making use of gross anatomy practice, the AL functions as a hub for horizontal and vertical integrations in medical education.

    Download PDF (1259K)
invited article
  • Maho Isono
    2016 Volume 47 Issue 6 Pages 353-361
    Published: December 25, 2016
    Released: August 10, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

     There is a growing interest in qualitative research among Japanese clinicians. Many of those who are interested in qualitative research attempt to identify the best method to guide them throughout their research. However, good qualitative research never arises from a method but a researcher's way of looking at reality. This paper, therefore, is based on cultural anthropology that has a long history of conducting qualitative research and illustrates three philosophical attitudes that leverage these clinicians for generating significant qualitative research results. These are: (i) looking at the reality from the perspective of informants, (ii) suspending researchers' ethics and their attempts to control people, such as patients and their families, and (iii) aiming at discovering not the average of the collected qualitative data but a new perspective that can only be found in the research field.

    Download PDF (845K)
bulletin board
invited article
bulletin board
feedback
Top