Igaku Kyoiku / Medical Education (Japan)
Online ISSN : 2185-0453
Print ISSN : 0386-9644
ISSN-L : 0386-9644
Volume 48 , Issue 5
Showing 1-12 articles out of 12 articles from the selected issue
original paper
  • Kikuko Taketomi, Junji Otaki, Hidenobu Kawabata, Tsuguya Fukui
    2017 Volume 48 Issue 5 Pages 289-296
    Published: October 25, 2017
    Released: July 05, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Introduction: We conducted a survey to examine the current state of objectives, evaluation, and issues related to the current clinical resident training system.

    Methods: We conducted focus group interviews using Skype software for qualitative analysis and classified the data using content analysis. The subjects were 20 experienced residents and/or attending physicians from the current and previous training systems.

    Results: The collective opinions were classified as positive, negative and neutral opinions with respect to ‘objectives', ‘evaluation' and ‘training program'.

    Discussion: The findings are expected to provide a basis for revising the current system.

    Download PDF (789K)
review
  • Japan Society for Medical Education, Postgraduate Medical Education Co ...
    2017 Volume 48 Issue 5 Pages 297-303
    Published: October 25, 2017
    Released: July 05, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

     Medical education is one of the most important fields for the development of the medical profession. Continuity from college to lifelong education is also necessary. Post-graduate Medical Education Committee of Japan Society for Medical Education planned a series that focused on the postgraduate medical training system in Japan. The project describe the relationship between postgraduate medical training, undergraduate medical education, specialty training, and lifelong development from the viewpoint of medical education. For the first time in this series, we describe the postgraduate medical training system that has been compulsory since 2004, including its history, current programs, completion criteria, and others factors.

    Download PDF (863K)
committee reports
  • The 18th Educational Materials' Development Committee & The 19th Learn ...
    2017 Volume 48 Issue 5 Pages 305-310
    Published: October 25, 2017
    Released: July 05, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

     Recent changes in patient safety policy have led to the increasing significance of simulation-based medical education. However, among Japanese medical schools, we have confirmed considerable differences in simulation-based, clinical clerkship learning environments that may affect different learning opportunities for trainings with simulators or simulated patients. We conducted nationwide surveys on the prevalence and application of clinical skills laboratories for clerkships in 2012 and 2016. Registered questionnaires were sent to all medical schools (n=80). The response rate was 95%. Seventy-four schools (97%) have installed a skills laboratory. Floor space for the laboratory varied from 214 m2 in 2012 to 339 m2 in 2016. The mean number of annual uses by medical students increased from 1,402 to 1,978, Although there were favorable changes, such as more spacious learning areas and an increase in annual uses by medical students, there were significant disparities in the implementation of simulation-based learning among schools. For example, only 29 schools (38%) implemented training programs with simulated patients. Further effort to spread learning with simulated patients seems necessary.

    Download PDF (875K)
  • Committee on Professionalism and Behavioral Sciences, the Japan Societ ...
    2017 Volume 48 Issue 5 Pages 311-314
    Published: October 25, 2017
    Released: July 05, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

     The importance of humanity education including "empathy" in medical education is increasing. Considering this, the Committee on Professionalism and Behavioral Sciences of the Japan Society for Medical Education organized a workshop titled, "Empathy and ‘Patients' Perspectives' ―Suggestion for Medical Education" . On the basis of findings from several medical fields, including medical informatics, medical anthropology, and medical sociology, we discussed the issue of uncertainty in patients and healthcare professionals' perspectives. We concluded that healthcare professionals should not empathize with patients as a strategy for persuasion but as a way to seek a mutual and flexible decision-making model that considers the uncertainty of patient perspectives.

    Download PDF (690K)
invited article
letter to the editor
letter to the editor
letter to the editor
review meeting
announcement
feedback
Top