Igaku Kyoiku / Medical Education (Japan)
Online ISSN : 2185-0453
Print ISSN : 0386-9644
ISSN-L : 0386-9644
Volume 52 , Issue 1
Showing 1-17 articles out of 17 articles from the selected issue
special publication
special publication
practice research article
  • Machiko Saeki Yagi, Reiko Murakami, Shigeki Tsuzuku, Mitsue Suzuki, Hi ...
    Type: research-article
    2021 Volume 52 Issue 1 Pages 9-17
    Published: February 25, 2021
    Released: September 18, 2021
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS

     Information pertaining to self-regulated learning strategies for nurses in distance learning is scarce, There is also insufficient information regarding suitable learning support. We conducted a survey, exploring the demographic data and self-regulated learning strategies of 183 nurses who used distance learning; 159 nurses responded. In this study, nurses tended to use “asking peers” as their primary learning support. Additionally, “developing learning plans,” “devising learning methods,” and “reflecting on learning methods” showed a positive correlation. “Developing learning plans,” “devising learning methods,” and “rewarding oneself” also showed a positive correlation. Finally, a positive correlation was found between “asking peers” and “rewarding oneself.” A bulletin board for exchanging opinions among learners and the implementation of a pre-course were suggested as ways to support distance learning for nurses.

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  • Hisashi Nishisako, Masanori Hirose, Tomoya Tsuchiya, Kenya Ie, Chiaki ...
    Type: research-article
    2021 Volume 52 Issue 1 Pages 19-29
    Published: February 25, 2021
    Released: September 18, 2021
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS

     Many papers on medical education emphasize the idea that obtaining structure through the practice of Oral Case Presentations (OCPs) is essential and efficient to brush up presentation skills. However, psychological resistance to giving a public presentation is an obstacle in learning OCPs. The aim of this survey is to evaluate the educational effect of our teaching method using a playful learning approach for presentation. This study was conducted by using an anonymous self-administered questionnaire for medical students during their clinical clerkship. One hundred twenty eight students participated in this survey. Didactics and small group discussions took place during the first week of clerkship, and participants were asked to give presentations about their original theme during the second week. Questionnaires were distributed before and after the end of each session. The results showed that psychological resistance to presentations decreased, positive feelings increased, and students became more aware of the purpose, place, and subject of their presentations. Each parameter statistically improved at each phase. A playful learning approach is effective in teaching presentations, including OCPs.

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short report
  • Izuru Matsuda, Naoji Hanayama, Yuzuru Sato
    Type: research-article
    2021 Volume 52 Issue 1 Pages 31-35
    Published: February 25, 2021
    Released: September 18, 2021
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS

    Introduction: Work style reform of medical doctors is now an actively discussed matter in Japan. There is also the problem of how to balance the management of legal working hours and the value of medical education in junior residency programs. In particular night and holiday shifts in emergency departments are one of the most important causes of working hour elongation for junior residents. We tried to construct a legally appropriate management method to control their working hours including night and holiday shifts. Method: One-Month Variable Working Hours System and two-shift system were applied to labor management in the medical residency program. Night and holiday working hours were included in regular working hours. Day-time working hours were adjusted to the weekly schedule of each clinical department to cover most of its daily work. Result: Overtime working hours of all residents, including the night and holyday shifts, were managed within the legal limits of 45 hours a month, unless additional overtime work was required. Discussion: Managing worktime through the use of the One-Month Variable Working Hours System is thought to be feasible. In the junior residency program, night and holiday shifts in the emergency department could also be balanced.

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  • Yoshimi Kozai, Sayaka Oikawa, Mana Taguchi
    Type: research-article
    2021 Volume 52 Issue 1 Pages 37-41
    Published: February 25, 2021
    Released: September 18, 2021
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS

    Introduction: In order to improve education for simulation specialists, which is insufficient in Japan, it was necessary to visualize what they must learn. As a first step, we conducted a survey to determine the work conditions of Japanese specialists. Method: Based on the US operation manual and data from interviews with Japanese specialists, a 30- items questionnaire was created. Responses from 16 specialists at 12 facilities were collected. Result: The survey showed that all 30 items were performed by specialists at more than 40% of the facilities. Among them, the category of “technology” had the highest rating. Discussion: The work items and categories listed in the questionnaire are expected to be used as outcomes for specialist education in Japan.

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  • Toshiro Uchino, Shinzo Takamori
    Type: research-article
    2021 Volume 52 Issue 1 Pages 43-46
    Published: February 25, 2021
    Released: September 18, 2021
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS

    Objective: To examine the course after junior residents interrupted their clinical training program in Kurume University Hospital and to examine the reasons for interruption. Method: 700 junior residents were recruited from 2004 to 2018. We investigated whether training was restarted and completed for those who had interrupted training. Results: There were 9 residents who interrupted their studies (1.3%). The interruption rate was high among female residents, 2.8% for female and 0.4% for male. The most common reason for interruption was 5 due to illness, of which 4 had mental health problems. All but one, who took a research position, had resumed and completed training at another facility. Summary: It was confirmed that most of the residents who interrupted their studies had completed their training. Our findings help to deepen our knowledge of the type of support residents need to restart their training.

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committee report
  • Medical Education Cyber Symposium Committee, Junichi Tanaka, Toshiaki ...
    Type: research-article
    2021 Volume 52 Issue 1 Pages 47-51
    Published: February 25, 2021
    Released: September 18, 2021
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS

     The novel coronavirus infection (COVID-19) has significantly impacted medical education and the need to respond to rapidly changing and uncertain situation. In addition, with the decision to hold this year’s annual meeting, it was deemed necessary to have a forum for information sharing and discussion. Therefore, a special committee was formed to organize a cyber-symposium on medical education, and four symposia were held every two weeks, starting May 2020, under the themes of ‘Future Clinical Clerkship’, ‘Examinations’, ‘Post-graduate Education’ and ‘Medical Education with Corona’. This paper reports these symposia and provides an overview and future considerations.

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committee report
  • Interprofessional Education Committee, Junji Haruta, Michiko Goto, Tak ...
    Type: research-article
    2021 Volume 52 Issue 1 Pages 53-57
    Published: February 25, 2021
    Released: September 18, 2021
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS

     It is difficult to implement interprofessional education (IPE) in the classroom due to COVID-19. To share our knowledge of online IPE, we report on how we provided IPE for first-year students at two universities. At Mie University, a class was implemented to use Zoom. Quizzes and chats promoted interactions between instructors and students. At Hokkaido University of Science, an online team medical experience game was conducted via Zoom and a Learning Management System (LMS). The activity promoted interaction between students through gameplay and clear instructions. In both cases, students could successfully develop online IPE based on existing learning methods. Through their experience, it was clear that students are able to understand other professionals’ roles. They were also to commit to membership and/or teamship. On the other hand, students faced challenges with faculty familiarity and time allocation.

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letter to the editor (Book Review)
letter to the editor
letter to the editor (Book Review)
institutional members
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