Igaku Kyoiku / Medical Education (Japan)
Online ISSN : 2185-0453
Print ISSN : 0386-9644
ISSN-L : 0386-9644
Volume 52, Issue 4
Displaying 1-26 of 26 articles from this issue
practice research article
  • Shuntaro Aoki, Yoshitake Takebayashi, Yayoi Shikama, Kiyotaka Yasui, K ...
    Article type: research-article
    2021 Volume 52 Issue 4 Pages 295-304
    Published: August 25, 2021
    Released on J-STAGE: January 23, 2022
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS

    Introduction: This paper reports the results of a practical communication education program for medical students that incorporates motivational interviewing and nonverbal communication. Methods: Changes in confidence in communication before and after the class were measured with the NRS scale and a corresponding t-test, and qualitative analysis of the class feedback was conducted by text mining using KH coders and content analysis. Results: The results showed that the students’ confidence in communication increased after the class. The most frequently mentioned topics in the feedback were communication, ability, class, learning, self, questions, conversation, speaking, partner, and listening. Conclusions: This is the first validation of the effectiveness of motivational interviewing and nonverbal communication in improving the communication confidence of Japanese medical students.

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review article
  • Masahiro Tanabe
    Article type: research-article
    2021 Volume 52 Issue 4 Pages 305-311
    Published: August 25, 2021
    Released on J-STAGE: January 23, 2022
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS

     In the past, pre-graduate medical education and clinical training have not been sufficiently discussed and consistent training of physicians has not been carried out because the entities that implement the studies are different. In order to realize high quality pre-graduate education and post-graduate clinical training, and to promote seamless training of physicians, it is necessary to establish a system of medical education. It is also necessary to consider the outcomes of pre-graduate medical education and clinical training to maintain consistency in the review of clinical training system for physicians in 2020. This paper discusses the Model Core Curriculum for Medical Education and clinical training from the perspective of outcome-based education for consistent physician training.

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short report
  • Tomoo Hidaka, Shota Endo, Hideaki Kasuga, Yusuke Masuishi, Takeyasu Ka ...
    Article type: research-article
    2021 Volume 52 Issue 4 Pages 313-317
    Published: August 25, 2021
    Released on J-STAGE: January 23, 2022
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS

    Background: The aims of the present study were to reveal the impact of the introduction of social medicine training one year earlier in a new university curriculum on subjective/objective evaluation of medical students, and to discuss the readiness of said students. Methods: In this natural experiment study, subjects comprised 73 third- (n = 31) and fourth-grade (n = 42) medical students who participated in social medicine training, namely “Family Health Practice Tutorial,” in 2017. The data consisted of student’s self-assessment and assessment from clients. The associations between these assessments and student grade were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U test and ordinal logistic regression. Results: The score for “Language” in the assessment from the clients was significantly lower in the third-grade students than in the fourth-grade students after adjustment for gender (odds ratio = 0.147; 95% confidence interval = [0.027, 0.797]). Discussion: Insufficient readiness for language to residents in the community was found in third-grade medical students. Advanced communication training prior to practice for third-grade students may contribute to sustainable social medicine training in the community.

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  • Yukiko Nagatani, Miyuki Nakaoka, Rintaro Imafuku, Toshiko Yoshida, Tet ...
    2021 Volume 52 Issue 4 Pages 319-324
    Published: August 25, 2021
    Released on J-STAGE: January 23, 2022
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS

    Introduction: This study aims at investigating what dental hygienists learned through training with a simulated patient and how they applied their learning in practice. Method: Open-ended questionnaire surveys on their perceptions and experiences of health communication were undertaken by 21 dental hygienists before and after communication trainings. Result: Before the training, they felt it difficult to cope with patients’ negative responses to their communication. However, after the training, they deeply considered how they should be as health professional through reflection on their own communication style. In their practice, they tried to communicate while considering the patient’s situation. Discussion: Participants’ critical reflection, which was encouraged in this training, resulted in application of their learning to clinical practice.

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practice report - introduction of a new approach
  • Nagisa Shinagawa, Tomoteru Inada, Motofumi Yoshida
    Article type: research-article
    2021 Volume 52 Issue 4 Pages 325-330
    Published: August 25, 2021
    Released on J-STAGE: January 23, 2022
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS

     The International University of Health and Welfare School of Medicine accepts 20 international students every year. In this paper, we report on the practice of “Medical Japanese Class” for these international students. The “Medical Japanese Class” is a class in which students learn medical terminology through listening, speaking, reading, and writing activities, and make presentations in Japanese based on the knowledge they have learned in English. This is a combination of the Language for Specific Purposes model and the Sheltered model, of Content-Based Language Instruction. We designed and implemented a lesson in which Japanese instructors used medical materials to introduce medical terminology and expressions. Medical faculty checked the application and correctness of medical content.

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working group report
  • Reflection on the Unprofessional Behavior of Medical Professionals Experienced during the Clinical Clerkship
    Yasushi Miyata
    Article type: research-article
    2021 Volume 52 Issue 4 Pages 331-335
    Published: August 25, 2021
    Released on J-STAGE: January 23, 2022
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS

     Dealing with unprofessional behavior may have stages of identification (definition), prevention, discovery, evaluation, remediation, and follow-up. What is an unprofessional behavior? How to avoid it. How to discover it. Why did the behavior occur and what effect did it have? How to remediate the behavior of unprofessional learners and healthcare provider. What happened to them and their behavior after that? Dealing with unprofessional behavior is complex. In addition, there are few opportunities to share concrete examples of dealing with unprofessional behavior, and it is difficult to share know-how on how to deal with it. For this reason, educators are sometimes even exhausted in dealing with unprofessional cases. It is very meaningful to share the response to unprofessional behavior even little by little.

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letter to the editor (Book Review)
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letter to the editor (Book Review)
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