Mycoscience
Online ISSN : 1618-2545
Print ISSN : 1340-3540
Advance online publication
Displaying 1-8 of 8 articles from this issue
  • Chang-Hsin Kuo, Sung-Yuan Hsieh, Teik-Khiang Goh
    Article type: Full paper
    Article ID: MYC638
    Published: 2024
    Advance online publication: June 29, 2024
    JOURNAL OPEN ACCESS ADVANCE PUBLICATION

    Fusichalara pallida sp. nov. is described from decaying wood submerged in a freshwater stream in Taiwan. The phylogenetic relationship of Fusichalara species was sought among representative taxa from related fungal lineages, namely the Chaetosphaeriales and Glomerellalles in the Sordariomycetes, and various other ordinal groups in the Eurotiomycetes, by comparing the concatenated ITS and LSU sequences of their nuc rDNA. The novel Fusichalara species from Taiwan clustered with F. minuta within the Sclerococcales besides other ordinal groups in the Eurotiomycetes. Morphologically, F. pallida is comparable with F. dimorphospora and F. novae-zelandiae in having long-cylindrical first-formed conidia and fusiform subsequent conidia with paler end cells, however, they differ in conidial dimensions. With the addition of this novel taxon, Fusichala now comprises seven species. A synopsis of these species and a composite illustration of their conidial morphology are given to ease identification.

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  • Nanthawan Kaeoniwong, Kozue Sotome, Tsuyoshi Ichiyanagi, Norihiro Shim ...
    Article type: Full paper
    Article ID: MYC639
    Published: 2024
    Advance online publication: June 29, 2024
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    In this study, white jelly mushrooms that were collected in Tottori Prefecture, Japan, were identified as Tremella yokohamensis by phylogenetic analysis of the rDNA-ITS region. Fluorescent microscopic analysis using 4’,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining to visualize the nuclei in each cell revealed that basidiospores isolated from the fruiting body were monokaryotic. Furthermore, monokaryotic yeasts were germinated from these basidiospores and the resulting crossed mycelium was dikaryotic and bore clamp cells, suggesting a heterothallic lifecycle for this species. Crossing between compatible yeast strains, such as TUFC 101924 and TUFC 101925, that were isolated from the same fruiting body, successfully induced development of the filamentous stage bearing clamp connections after 7 d of incubation on Kagome vegetable juice agar medium. Mating compatibility tests employing 15 basidiospore isolates revealed that this fungus possess a bipolar mating system. The results indicated that T. yokohamensis is a heterothallic and bipolar mushroom.

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  • Yukako Hattori, Hayato Masuya, Masato Torii, Toshizumi Miyamoto, Toshi ...
    Article type: Short communication
    Article ID: MYC629
    Published: 2024
    Advance online publication: June 05, 2024
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    Supplementary material

    Paulownia tree canker is a major disease of Paulowniae tomentosa in Japan. The pathogen was described as Valsa paulowniae in 1916 by Hemmi and Miyabe. However, its current taxonomic status and phylogenetic position are uncertain. In this study, we reviewed the protologue of this species and rediscovered the syntypes maintained at the Hokkaido University Museum (SAPA). From these specimens, a lectotype was selected. The molecular phylogenetic position of this species was examined with newly collected samples. Based on the result of phylogeny and morphology, an epitype of this species was designated and transferred to the genus Cytospora.

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  • Norio Takeshita, Yusuke Takashima, Yousuke Degawa
    Article type: Full paper
    Article ID: MYC634
    Published: 2024
    Advance online publication: May 29, 2024
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    Supplementary material

    Most Mucoromycota fungi form zygospores as sexual reproductive structures. When two colonies of compatible strains meet, zygospores are formed in the area where the colonies meet. The structure and development of zygospores have been studied for a long time by light microscopy and electron microscopy. This study is the first time-lapse report on the dynamic movements of sexual and asexual reproductive processes by live imaging in Gilbertella persicaria (Choanephoraceae, Mucorales). Our live imaging analysis indicated the formation of zygospores begin immediately after two aerial hyphae contact whether at the tip or middle of the hyphae. The early-stage zygospores elongated from the contact site with a rate of 1.2–1.7 μm/s and reach < 200 μm in 2–3 h. Following maturation of zygospores, from progametangia to gametangia and maturation stage, took a few hours, in total 5 to 6 h after the first contact of two hyphae. When a zygospore was formed near the tip of hypha in contact with the partner hypha, the hyphal growth ceased. When zygospore was formed behind the tip of the hypha, the hyphal growth continued without slowing down. This study provides quantitative spatio-temporal information on the dynamics of zygospore formation.

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  • Hiroki Misawa, Yu Tateishi, Yuka Horimai, Aira Mizuno, Fuuma Hida, Hit ...
    Article type: Full paper
    Article ID: MYC637
    Published: 2024
    Advance online publication: June 05, 2024
    JOURNAL OPEN ACCESS ADVANCE PUBLICATION
    Supplementary material

    Tricholoma matsutake is an edible ectomycorrhizal mushroom that forms a symbiotic association with Pinaceae trees by constructing a large extraradical mycelial area (called a shiro) in the soil. The detection of this fungal mycelium in the soil is crucial for estimating the success of outplanted mycorrhizal seedlings inoculated with T. matsutake under experimental conditions. Although several T. matsutake-specific DNA markers have been reported for efficient detection in the field, no comparative study has been conducted to assess their effectiveness. In the present study, we targeted the nuclear ribosomal DNA intergenic spacer 2 (IGS2) region for the detection of T. matsutake. The newly designed TmSP-I-2F/TmSP-I-2R primer pair, which targets a partial IGS2 sequence (543 bp), effectively detected T. matsutake from pine root and soil samples via PCR assay, outperforming other T. matsutake-specific primers. In combination with a PCR system targeting LTR DNA markers that were previously developed, a PCR system with the TmSP-I-2F/TmSP-I-2R primer pair set can expedite investigations of the dynamics of T. matsutake genets in mycorrhizas and shiro.

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  • Shuai Jiang, Jing Ma, Yun-Xiao Han, Rou Xue, Lin-Jie Su, Tai-Jie Yu, L ...
    Article type: Short communication
    Article ID: MYC632
    Published: 2024
    Advance online publication: May 31, 2024
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    Russula rubrosquamosa (Russulaceae, Russlales) is described as a novel species from Yunnan Province, southwestern China. It is morphologically recognised by a small basidiocarp with orange-yellow to orange-red scales on the pileus and stipe, white lamellae, orange-red to bright red basal mycelia, subglobose to broadly ellipsoid basidiospores with dense warts and short or long ridges. Phylogenetically analyses of DNA sequences from part of the 28S gene combined with the nuclear rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region also confirm that R. rubrosquamosa forms an independent lineage within Russula subgenus Heterophyllidia section Ingratae. A comprehensive description, color photographs of fresh basidiomata, line-drawings of microstructures and comparisons with morphologically similar species are provided in this paper.

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  • Takashi Kuribayashi, Misaki Tsukada, Nanako Asahi, Shin-ichi Kai, Ken- ...
    Article type: Note
    Article ID: MYC636
    Published: 2024
    Advance online publication: May 31, 2024
    JOURNAL OPEN ACCESS ADVANCE PUBLICATION

    Sake is a Japanese alcoholic beverage produced by fermenting steamed rice and koji (a culture of Aspergillus oryzae on steamed rice) with sake yeast, a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Sake yeast strains are important for maintaining product quality and process efficiency. In this study, a S. cerevisiae strain from Muramatsu Park, Gosen City, Niigata Prefecture was isolated using a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay. The yeast strain was cultured using the mass spore-cell/cell-cell mating method with a sake yeast haploid. The resultant hybrid yeast strain, HG-3-F2, exhibited superior efficiency in alcoholic fermentation compared with the HG-3 strain. Our findings support the applicability of these original and mating strains in sake brewing.

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  • Renate Heinzelmann, Heidy Baggenstos, Andreas Rudolf
    Article type: Full paper
    Article ID: MYC633
    Published: 2024
    Advance online publication: May 13, 2024
    JOURNAL OPEN ACCESS ADVANCE PUBLICATION
    Supplementary material

    Fungal bioluminescence is mystifying humans since ancient times. Nevertheless, the biosynthetic pathway behind this phenomenon was only very recently resolved. Fungal bioluminescence occurs in five distantly related linages (Omphalotaceae lineage, Armillaria lineage, mycenoid lineage, Lucentipes lineage and Eoscyphella lineage) of the basidiomycete order Agaricales. Recent research suggests fungal bioluminescence has emerged 160 million years ago in the most common ancestor of the mycenoid and marasmioid clade and is maintained since then. Surprisingly, in the mycenoid linage, primarily represented by the genus Mycena, most species are considered non-luminescent, implying that many mycenoid species have lost their bioluminescent ability. Here, we report evidence for bioluminescence in Mycena crocata and show that the genome of this species is fully equipped with the genes associated with fungal bioluminescence. Mycena crocata is a long-known species frequently reported from Europe and Japan, which was considered non-luminescent until now. The low light emission intensity and the restriction of the luminescence to the vegetative mycelium and the base of the basidiome may be reasons why bioluminescence was not perceived earlier. We assume there might be other known Mycena species whose luminescent properties are not yet discovered, and that therefore the number of bioluminescent Mycena species is currently underestimated.

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