The Journal of The Japanese Society of Balneology, Climatology and Physical Medicine
Online ISSN : 1884-3697
Print ISSN : 0029-0343
ISSN-L : 0029-0343
Volume 58 , Issue 4
Showing 1-7 articles out of 7 articles from the selected issue
  • Hitoshi TAKE, Kazuo KUBOTA, Kousei TAMURA, Hitoshi KURABAYASHI, Jun'ic ...
    1995 Volume 58 Issue 4 Pages 213-217
    Published: 1995
    Released: April 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Effects of hyperthermia on the formation of platelet-derived microparticles (MP) and the expression of surface CD62 antigen were examined in normal human platelets. Venous blood from healthy subjects, anticoagulated with 1 volume of 3.8% sodium citrate, was heated at 37°C (control), 42°C and 47°C for 15 minutes. Then 2μl of each sample was incubated with FITC or PE-conjugated anti-human CD42b or CD62 antibodies, and assayed for MP and CD62 by flow cytometry. The percentage of MP after the incubation was not significantly different from that before the incubation nor that of control (9.9±0.6% before incubation, 10.2±0.6% at 37°C, 10.8±0.4% at 42°C and 10.3±0.3% at 47°C), CD62 positive-platelets slightly increased after the incubation, but no significant differences were observed between the control value and the values at 42°C and 47°C (1.6±0.3% at 37°C, 1.9±0.5% at 42°C and 1.7±0.3% at 47°C). These data suggest that hyperthermia has only a weak stimulatory effect on platelets and is unable to induce MP formation.
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  • Kazuhiro KAJIMOTO, Takashi MIFUNE, Fumihiro MITSUNOBU, Satoshi YOKOTA, ...
    1995 Volume 58 Issue 4 Pages 218-224
    Published: 1995
    Released: April 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
  • Takashi MIFUNE, Satoshi YOKOTA, Kazuhiro KAJIMOTO, Fumihiro MITSUNOBU, ...
    1995 Volume 58 Issue 4 Pages 225-231
    Published: 1995
    Released: April 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
  • Satoru YAMAGUCHI
    1995 Volume 58 Issue 4 Pages 232-240
    Published: 1995
    Released: April 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Although the clinical usefulness of acupuncture has been widely accepted, quantitative analysis of the effects of acupuncture had received little attention. We therefore examined the pupillary dynamics before and after acupuncture treatment on 30 patients with tension type headaches and 15 healthy volunteers. We used open-loop video pupillography, which enables objective measurement of autonomic nervous functions, and obtained the results below.
    1) In patients with tension type headaches, acupuncture reduced the pupillary area before photic stimulation (A1) (10min after: p<0.01, immediately after and 20min after: p<0.05) and increased maximum velocity (VC) and acceleration (AC) of constriction (p<0.01). However, no significant changes were observed in maximum velocity of dilatation (VD).
    2) In healthy volunteers, acupuncture transiently increased VC alone (p<0.05), and no significant changes were observed in other parameters.
    The above data suggested that open-loop video pupillography is a useful method to quantitatively analyze the effect of acupuncture on pupillary dynamics and that parasympathetic nervous functions play an important role in the effect of acupuncture in the patients with tension type headaches. Also, it is possible that acupuncture may affect the central nervous system at a higher level of the medulla spinalis.
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  • Fumihiro MITSUNOBU, Takashi MIFUNE, Kazuhiro KAJIMOTO, Satoshi YOKOTA, ...
    1995 Volume 58 Issue 4 Pages 241-248
    Published: 1995
    Released: April 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
  • Michihiko Ueda, Toshiki YAZAKI
    1995 Volume 58 Issue 4 Pages 249-256
    Published: 1995
    Released: April 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The thermotherapeutic effects of bathing with CO2 water obtained from a newly developed CO2 water supply system was studied in comparison with bathing with plain water. After 10min bathing at 39°C, dermal blood flow in the upper arm region was higher in the group bathing with CO2 water than in that bathing with plain water (p<0.05).
    Further, the skin temperature lowering in the forehead region after bathing was slower in the group bathing with CO2 water than in that bathing with plain water. The subjective sense of being heated and sense of comfort during and after bathing were also higher in the group bathing with CO2 water. No side effects were found. It is therefore suggested that the CO2 water obtained from this system is useful for enhancing the thermotherapeutic effect of bathing.
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  • Albrecht FALKENBACH, Edgar WEBER, Thomas WENDT, Ichiro WATANABE, Yuko ...
    1995 Volume 58 Issue 4 Pages 257-263
    Published: 1995
    Released: April 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The effects of physical exercise on psychologic variables during mental stress were evaluated. On each of two different days (for intraindividual control) 20 healthy dental students carried out four (modified) d2-tests (3.5min available for each test). After two such tests there was a rest period of 5 minutes. During this intermission either a standardized physical exercise was performed or -the other day- (cross over, balanced) the volunteers rested in a sitting position while listening to relaxing music. After the rest period another two d2-tests were carried out. Thereafter a questionnaire (“adjective list”, in German) defining 15 subscales (categories of the state of well-being) was completed by all volunteers to quantify parameters of their actual mood. For intraindividual control the results of the subscales obtained on both days were compared by the paired student-t-test. In the test with physical exercise during the break the scores of the subscale being activated were significantly (p<0.05) higher than in the test with music. The other subscales showed no significant difference. In all tests the scores of the d2-tests reflecting the capability to concentrate showed an increase after the break, which was significantly higher, if physical exercise was performed during the break. Physical exercise can alleviate certain symptoms of mental stress. Feeling more active is the predominant subjective effect.
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