The Japanese Journal of Personality
Online ISSN : 1349-6174
Print ISSN : 1348-8406
ISSN-L : 1348-8406
Volume 20 , Issue 1
Showing 1-9 articles out of 9 articles from the selected issue
Invited Article
Articles
  • Tsutomu Okada
    Type: Article
    2011 Volume 20 Issue 1 Pages 11-20
    Published: July 30, 2011
    Released: October 25, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This study explored how the characteristics of friendship related to self-esteem in adolescents. Surveys measuring friendship, sense of acceptance, sense of rejection, and self-esteem were administered to 246 senior high school students and 236 college students. Cluster analysis yielded three friendship patterns: (1) adolescents who avoided an emotionally close friendship; (2) adolescents who participated in an emotionally close friendship; and (3) adolescents who were careful not to hurt or be hurt by their friends and who tried just to be together with their friends. The results of structural equation modeling analysis suggested that the tendency of “being careful not to be hurt by their friends” inhibited the “sense of rejection” through “being careful not to hurt their friends,” and ultimately improved their self-esteem.
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  • Namiko Egami
    Type: Article
    2011 Volume 20 Issue 1 Pages 21-31
    Published: July 30, 2011
    Released: October 25, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This study examined the relationship of borderline personality traits with life events and unpleasant/pleasant emotions in university students. Study 1 developed the borderline personality traits scale, which consisted of six factors with sufficient internal consistency and validity. In Study 2, 378 university students completed a questionnaire assessing the borderline personality traits, and the frequency of negative and positive events and unpleasant/pleasant emotions in interpersonal and achievement domains. Analysis of the data yielded the following results. University students with high scores on the borderline personality traits scale reported more negative events in interpersonal and achievement domains, and they felt unpleasant about them. These students did not feel pleasant in spite of having positive events in achievement domains. The present results suggest that university students with borderline personality traits had difficulty to acknowledge positive life events as positive.
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Exploratory Reports
  • Takanobu Matsuura, Akiko Kameyama, Shinji Sakamoto
    Type: Exploratory Report
    2011 Volume 20 Issue 1 Pages 32-40
    Published: July 30, 2011
    Released: October 25, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This study examined the relationship among self-preoccupation or external-preoccupation (indicated by excessive and enduring attention focused on the self or the external world), anxiety and depression. We used anxiety and depression scales which differentiate between the comorbidity their symptoms. Participants were Japanese university students (N=271) who completed a questionnaire study. Partial correlation and regression analyses revealed that self-preoccupation was moderately related to anxiety after controlling for depression, and that external-preoccupation was related neither to anxiety nor to depression. Based on these results, the relationships between self-preoccupation and duration of anxiety, and the intention when we shift attention to external subject and anxiety were discussed.
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Short Reports
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