RADIOISOTOPES
Online ISSN : 1884-4111
Print ISSN : 0033-8303
ISSN-L : 0033-8303
Volume 26 , Issue 11
Showing 1-15 articles out of 15 articles from the selected issue
  • Hiroshi MIYAHARA, Makoto YOSHIDA, Tamaki WATANABE
    1977 Volume 26 Issue 11 Pages 761-766
    Published: November 15, 1977
    Released: September 07, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The α-ray thickness gauge is used to measure non-destructively the thicknesses of thin films, and up to the present day, a thin film with uniform thickness is only taken up as the object of α-ray thickness gauge. When the thickness is determined from the displacement between the absorption curves in the presence and absence o f thin film, the absorption curve must be displaced in parallel. When many uniform particles were dispersed as sample, the shape of the absorption curve was calculated as the sum of many absorption curves corresponding to the thin films with different thicknesses. By the comparison of the calculated and measured absorption curves, the number of particles, or the mean superficial density can be determined. This means the extension of thickness measurement from uniform to non-uniform films. Furthermore, these particle models being applied to nonuniform thin film, the possibility of measuring the mean thickness and non-uniformity was discussed. As the result, if the maximum difference of the thickness was more than 0.2mg/cm2, the non-uniformity was considered to distinguish by the usual equipment. In this paper, an α-ray thickness gauge using the absorption curve method was treated, but one can apply this easily to an α-ray thickness gauge using α-ray energy spectra before and after the penetration of thin film.
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  • Makoto YOSHIDA, Hiroshi MIYAHARA, Tamaki WATANABE
    1977 Volume 26 Issue 11 Pages 767-773
    Published: November 15, 1977
    Released: September 07, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The mean superficial density of fine particles, such as polystyrene latex particles or ion exchange resin particles, dispersed on a thin supporting film was measured by means of the thickness gauge which used the absorption curves of α-rays. The measured absorption curves coincided with the ones calculated from the particle diameter, density, number of particles per unit area and equivalent film thickness to an absorption gas of 1 mmHg. On the other hand, when the particle diameter exceeded a certain limit, the measured mean superficial density which was derived from the pressure displacement of absorption curve considerably differed from the true mean superficial density. This limit can be calculated from the shape of absorption curve, which depends on the α-ray spectrum emitted from the source. In the case of the 241Am source used in this study, the limit was about 450 μg/cm2 for polystyrene latex particles.
    The mean superficial density of a sample can easily be obtained by measuring the pressure displacement of absorption curve when the maximum thickness difference is below the limit. However, when the maximum thickness difference exceeds the limit, it is necessary to estimate the whole shape of absorption curves.
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  • Takami KOYANAGI, Sinichi NAKAJIMA
    1977 Volume 26 Issue 11 Pages 774-779
    Published: November 15, 1977
    Released: September 07, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Radiation relay using the radiation scaler acts at the time when the output of the scaler comes to a set value. By this action, the stop valve in infusing line (or exhausting line) is closed and the increment (or decrement) of liquid level of tank is stopped.
    Same as radiation relay using CR rate meter, switching time of the relay of this system varies statistically due to the statistical property of radioactivity.
    In this paper, the probability density function of the switching time is calculated on the assumption that the pulse train is the Poisson process. Then, the relation between the switching time and the uncertainty in the stop level is examined under a constant incremental (or decremental) velocity of liquid level.
    Using these results, the minimum intensity of radiation which is necessary to obtain a given accuracy is calculated and the optimum scaling time is given to minimize the uncertainty corresponding to various velocity of liquid level.
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  • 1977 Volume 26 Issue 11 Pages 779
    Published: 1977
    Released: July 21, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Masa-aki MORI, Yoshihumi NARUSE, Hiroshi KOZUKA
    1977 Volume 26 Issue 11 Pages 780-783
    Published: November 15, 1977
    Released: September 07, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In order to investigate the excretion and distribution of 2, 4-DNT in the rat, 3H-2, 4-DNT was synthesized by nitration reaction of 3H-toluene. About 21.3 per cent of the single orally administered radioactivity was excreted in the 1st day-faeces. The amounts of radioactivity in the 2nd day- and 3rd day-faeces were to be about 4.1 and 1.1 per cent, respectively. About 13.5 per cent of the radioactivity administered was excreted in the 1st day-urine, but after the 2nd day the excretion of radioactivity was to be trace. In all, about 46 per cent of the radioactivity administered was excreted in the faeces and urine during the 7 days. Seven days after administration relatively high levels of radioactivity were retained in adipose tissue, skin, and liver, however, the amounts of remaining radioactivity were to be only 1.5, 0.6 and 0.4 per cent, respectively. The amounts of radioactivity of the other organs were to be trace.
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  • Hiroaki MATSUSHIMA, Makoto KATO, Yukiharu SUGIMURA, Masaaki HAZUE
    1977 Volume 26 Issue 11 Pages 784-789
    Published: November 15, 1977
    Released: September 07, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In vivo behavior of 111In-DTPA in rat and mouse after intra-ventricular administration was studied. Thus, 50μCi and 35μCi of 111In-DTPA was injected intra-ventricularly to rat and mouse respectively. At specific time intervals, the animals were sacrificed, then distribution in organs was determined by radioactivity counting and autoradiographic method. Urinary and fecal excretion were separately collected and excretion rates were estimated. Metabolites in urine of rat were examined with chromatography.
    A part of 111In-DTPA injected intra-ventricularly to the animals migrated to subarachnoid space, then radioactivity in cerebrospinal fluid effused into blood with about 1 hr initial half-life. Blood clearance was also rapid, about 1 hr after administration the blood level reached maximum and then decreased showing an initial half-life of about 1 hr.
    The predominant excretion route in rat was urinary and about 90% and 5% of adminstered dose were excreted within 48 hr through urine and feces respectively.
    Judging from the Rf-value of radioactivity peak on chromatograms, 111In-DTPA seems to be excreted without suffering any metabolic change. Concerning to the behavior of 111In-DTPA in male and female rat, no difference was observed, and the distribution pattern of 111In-DTPA in mouse was similar to that of rat.
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  • Masaomi TAKIZAWA, Kiyoshi MARUYAMA, Kazuhiro TSURUMI
    1977 Volume 26 Issue 11 Pages 790-795
    Published: November 15, 1977
    Released: September 07, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A method of making the multiple regional renograms and simple functional images are described. Thirty-six EDTA (or DTPA) images has been transferred from a gamma camera to a small computer with the magnetic tape. Thirteen regional renograms from a kidney have been made by using the single pixel ROIs from these images, a continuous 13 pixels horizontal and/or vertical of the matrix are selected, in distinction from right and left kidney.
    Two functional images have been made by the multi frame images as a peak arrival time and it's peak counts. Small change of the radioisotopic transportation in the kidney could be observed by the method, and change of the urodynamics could be extracted by two functional images. It will be actualize quantitative diagnosis to the renal function disorders.
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  • Yukio KANDA, Tomomasa OIKAWA
    1977 Volume 26 Issue 11 Pages 796-798
    Published: November 15, 1977
    Released: July 21, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Shogo SUZUKI, Shoji HIRAI
    1977 Volume 26 Issue 11 Pages 799-802
    Published: November 15, 1977
    Released: July 21, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Akiyoshi KAJITA, Isamu NARABAYASHI, Osamu ISHIDA, Takeo HAYASHI
    1977 Volume 26 Issue 11 Pages 803-806
    Published: November 15, 1977
    Released: July 21, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Tatsuya MIYAMAE, Masayasu KAN, Morio SEKI, Hiroshi NAKAGAWA
    1977 Volume 26 Issue 11 Pages 807-809
    Published: November 15, 1977
    Released: July 21, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Koichi YATOMI, Katsushi NAKASIKIRYO, Ryuji OKADA, Miki OGASAWARA, Tosh ...
    1977 Volume 26 Issue 11 Pages 810-812
    Published: November 15, 1977
    Released: July 21, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Okitsugu YAMASHITA
    1977 Volume 26 Issue 11 Pages 813-822
    Published: November 15, 1977
    Released: July 21, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Masami KISHIDA, Shin-ichi SUGA
    1977 Volume 26 Issue 11 Pages 823-834
    Published: November 15, 1977
    Released: July 21, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • 1977 Volume 26 Issue 11 Pages A1771-A1320
    Published: November 15, 1977
    Released: July 21, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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