SANGYO EISEIGAKU ZASSHI
Online ISSN : 1349-533X
Print ISSN : 1341-0725
ISSN-L : 1341-0725
Volume 51 , Issue 5
Showing 1-4 articles out of 4 articles from the selected issue
Original
  • Naomi Kuroki, Nana Miyashita, Yoshiyuki Hino, Kotaro Kayashima, Yoshih ...
    2009 Volume 51 Issue 5 Pages 49-59
    Published: 2009
    Released: October 08, 2009
    [Advance publication] Released: August 05, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The purpose of this study was to identify what motivates employers to promote good occupational health and safety practices in small-scale enterprises. Previous studies have shown that small-scale enterprises generally pay insufficient attention to issues of occupational health and safety. These findings were mainly derived from questionnaire based surveys. Nevertheless, some small-scale enterprises in which employers exercise good leadership do take a progressive approach to occupational health and safety. Although good practices can be identified in small-scale enterprises, it remains unclear what motivates employers in small-scale enterprises to actively implement occupational health and safety practices. We speculated that identifying employer motivations in promoting occupational health would help to spread good practices among small-scale enterprises. Using a qualitative approach based on the KJ methods, we interviewed ten employers who actively promote occupational health and safety in the workplace. The employers were asked to discuss their views of occupational health and safety in their own words. A semi-structured interview format was used, and transcripts were made of the interviews. Each transcript was independently coded by two or more researchers. These transcripts and codes were integrated and then the research group members discussed the heading titles and structural relationships between them according to the KJ method. Qualitative analysis revealed that all the employers expressed a strong interest in a "good company" and "good management". They emphasized four elements of "good management", namely "securing human resources", "trust of business partners", "social responsibility" and "employer's health condition itself", and considered that addressing occupational health and safety was essential to the achievement of these four elements. Consistent with previous findings, the results showed that implementation of occupational health and safety activities depended on "cost", "human resources", "time to perform", and "advisory organization". These results suggest that employer awareness of the relationship between good management and occupational health is essential to the implementation of occupational health and safety practices in small-scale enterprises.
    (San Ei Shi 2009; 51: 49-59)
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Field Study
  • Yoshihisa Fujino, Tomohisa Nagata, Naomi Kuroki, Seitaro Dohi, Masamic ...
    2009 Volume 51 Issue 5 Pages 60
    Published: 2009
    Released: October 08, 2009
    [Advance publication] Released: August 05, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A health impact assessment (HIA) was conducted to identify potential health impacts arising from policy reform of occupational health and safety at S-chemical company, a multinational global company that employs about 13,000 workers. A multidisciplinary team of health professionals including occupational physicians, an epidemiologist, and public health researchers oversaw the HIA. A project manager from S-company was also involved in the whole HIA process. A literature review, profiling using annual health examination data and interviews with stakeholders and key informants were undertaken in order to identify possible impacts. A range of positive and negative health impacts were identified and develop recommendations for implementation of the new occupational health policy were proposed. The HIA added value to the planning process for the occupational health policy reform.
    (San Ei Shi 2009; 51: 60-70)
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