JOURNAL of the JAPAN RESEARCH ASSOCIATION for TEXTILE END-USES
Online ISSN : 1884-6599
Print ISSN : 0037-2072
ISSN-L : 0037-2072
Volume 21 , Issue 10
Showing 1-7 articles out of 7 articles from the selected issue
  • [in Japanese]
    1980 Volume 21 Issue 10 Pages 408-414
    Published: October 25, 1980
    Released: September 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1980 Volume 21 Issue 10 Pages 415-418
    Published: October 25, 1980
    Released: September 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1980 Volume 21 Issue 10 Pages 421-424
    Published: October 25, 1980
    Released: September 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1980 Volume 21 Issue 10 Pages 425-431
    Published: October 25, 1980
    Released: September 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Hideaki Dewa
    1980 Volume 21 Issue 10 Pages 432-437
    Published: October 25, 1980
    Released: September 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The hand of carpets is the most important factors in end-use performances. This article aims to obtain the fundamental data on the hand of carpets. The hand of carpets is assumed to be constructed of the three primary hands, i.e., sensory compressive rigidity, surface softness and surface smoothness. A sensory test has been carried out to determine the weighted factor for each three primary hands to eval-uate the hand of carpets. The relations between sensory values and physical properties have been dis-cussed by the multi-regression analysis. The main results are:
    (1) The 16 panels are classified into four groups according to the pattern of hand of carpets. The first group evaluates the hand of carpets by only the sensory compressive rigidity. The second group eval-uates by only surface softness. The third group by both sensory compressive rigidy and surface softness. The fourth group by all the three primary hands.
    (2) Generally speaking, the hand of carpets is affected by the sensory surface smoothness.
    (3) The hand of carpets is mainly related to the initial compressive works W, compressive Resili-ence R and differential frictional force F.
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  • Masao Uruma, Mio Tominomori
    1980 Volume 21 Issue 10 Pages 438-442
    Published: October 25, 1980
    Released: September 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    It is a common experience that the visual degree of wrinkles are much affected by the colour of fabrics. This paper aims to investigate experimentally and statistically the relationship between colours of fabrics and the visual assessment of wrinkles. Fifteen women students have assessed the degree of wrinkles, produced by home laundering, by a paired comparison of the specimen with original unlaundered fabrics of no wrinkles. The score among following four has been given to each specimen: 0 (no difference), 1 (slight ifference), 2 (considerable difference) and 3 (extreme difference) . Fabrics are cotton broad, cotton denim, woll cashmere, rayon surah, polyester surah and polyester/cotton blended broad. Each fabric is, in colour, white, black, gray, red, green, yellow, blue, purple, brown and navy blue.
    (1) Fabrics of different colours but same fibers and construction, except a wrinkle-resistant poly-ester surah, showed a significant difference in visual degree of wrinkles among colours, suggesting that the assessment of degree of wrinkles are affected by the colour of fabrics.
    (2) A significant correlation has been found between the sensory scores of wrinkles and lightness of fabric colours. The higher the lightness, the greater the sensory scores of wrinkles, and trice versa. However a wrinkle-resistant polyester surah has shown no correlation. By contrast, no correlation has been found between the sensory scores of wrinkle and saturation (or chromaticity) of fabric colours.
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  • Toshihiro Gunji, Yoko Kawano
    1980 Volume 21 Issue 10 Pages 443-448
    Published: October 25, 1980
    Released: September 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    An investigation has been made of the shine, produced in wear, of wool 100 % and wool 50%/polyester 50% blended fabrics. First, the shine, produced in wear has visually been observed by a micro-scope. An appearance retention tester, for abradant of which an upholstery fabrics and other materials for desk, chairs, etc. are used, has been used to artificially reproduce the shine.
    (1) The cause of shine is not only the removal of scales of wool fibers but also abrasion damages (flat spots) of wool fibers.
    (2) The abradant that can produce the shine more easily are upholstery fabrics, synthetic leather of polyvinylchloride and decorative laminates used for furnitures and walls. Among decorative laminates, the laminate made from diallylphthalate resins mostly tends to produce the shine.
    (3) The degree of shine evaluated visually by the sensory test correlates well with the values of contrast gloss from a goniophotometric reflection light distribution curves.
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