JOURNAL of the JAPAN RESEARCH ASSOCIATION for TEXTILE END-USES
Online ISSN : 1884-6599
Print ISSN : 0037-2072
ISSN-L : 0037-2072
Volume 28 , Issue 8
Showing 1-5 articles out of 5 articles from the selected issue
  • [in Japanese]
    1987 Volume 28 Issue 8 Pages 297-302
    Published: August 25, 1987
    Released: September 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (6416K)
  • [in Japanese]
    1987 Volume 28 Issue 8 Pages 303-315
    Published: August 25, 1987
    Released: September 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (1803K)
  • [in Japanese]
    1987 Volume 28 Issue 8 Pages 316-321
    Published: August 25, 1987
    Released: September 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (874K)
  • Yoko Yamada, Masako Niwa
    1987 Volume 28 Issue 8 Pages 326-334
    Published: August 25, 1987
    Released: September 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This paper reports on an investigation into the effect of fabric structure and basic mechanical properties on seam slippage in fabrics for men's suits. The results are as follows
    (1) Seam slippage values tend to decrease as threads per inch and cover factor perpendicular to seam increase, such decrease being little affected by seam angle.
    (2) Seam slippage values tend to decrease as shear stiffness increases. At equal levels of shear stiffness. the seam slippage of satin weave is greater than that of plain weave ; the seam slippage of twill weave lies between that of satin and plain weave.
    (3) Seam slippage can be expressed as an exponential function of shear stillness G, 2HG and 2HG5. Equations, developed by the authors, to predict seam slippage using the shear stiffness of various textiles yielded accurate results. These equations apply to a seam of five stitches/cm and a tensile load of 12kg/2.5cm.
    (4) When the seam is paralle to the yarn axis, for one standard sewing thread, an approximately linear relationship was observed between the amount of seam slippage and the differential tensile elogation of the seamed/unseamed fabric used. It is therefore presumed that the seam slippage for a given sewing thread can be predicted on the basis of tensile properties of the sewing thread and the differential tensile elongation of the seamed/unseamed fabric used
    Download PDF (3855K)
  • Part 1: On the Structure of Clothing/Appearance Features Inferred from Personality Traits
    Susumu Kouyama, Satoko Ushida, You Masuda
    1987 Volume 28 Issue 8 Pages 335-343
    Published: August 25, 1987
    Released: September 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the structure of clothing/appearance features inferred from personality traits as a first step toward researching implicit personality theory related to clothing and appearance.
    Subjects were 239 female undergraduates. They were asked to rate five stimulus persons (SPs) on seventy-five items on a seven-point scale using two opposed clothing/appearance features each. SPs were described by one of twenty personality traits which compose ten antonym pairs. For checking the reliability of the rating, the same SPs were rated again after an interval of one week.
    The results of this study are as follows
    1. Fourty reliable clothing/appearance scales were chosen after checking the reliability of the seventy-five scales.
    2. The conspicuous clothing/appearance features inferred from personality traits were related to the factors by which one exaggerates one's appearance or disguises oneself.
    3. Subiects seemed to feel that personality traits were not indicated in the following clothing/appearance features : thickness of cloth, shilhouette of dress, and width of clothing, etc.
    4. Four factors were extracted using a factor analysis for rating the data on fourty clothing/appearance scales. They were interpreted as follows : I : Eccentricity of General Appearance, II : Sense of Fashion, III : Color Preference, IV : Sexual Image. The structure of clothing/appearance features inferred from personality traits seems to be formed of these four factors.
    Download PDF (1155K)
feedback
Top