SHIGAKU ZASSHI
Online ISSN : 2424-2616
Print ISSN : 0018-2478
ISSN-L : 0018-2478
Volume 116 , Issue 11
Showing 1-22 articles out of 22 articles from the selected issue
  • Type: Cover
    2007 Volume 116 Issue 11 Pages Cover1-
    Published: November 20, 2007
    Released: December 01, 2017
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  • Type: Cover
    2007 Volume 116 Issue 11 Pages Cover2-
    Published: November 20, 2007
    Released: December 01, 2017
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  • Junya TAKATSU
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 116 Issue 11 Pages 1729-1763
    Published: November 20, 2007
    Released: December 01, 2017
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    Within the research done by Matsumoto Masaaki on the development process of the Shang-shu 尚書 (Book of History) during the Warring States period, first, attention is paid to the value placed on the work by Confucian scholars of the early part of that period and their efforts to speed up its development, followed by the altogether different use of the work by other schools of thought during the middle of the period, resulting in what turned out to be a number of different versions. While the author of this article agrees with much of Matsumoto's research, on the above point about how the work developed, doubts must now be raised in light of the recent bibliographical research done on works from the pre-Qin Dynasty period. That is to say, it has become necessary to re-explain the wide discrepancies between the quotations from the Shang-shu and those from other works appearing in Meng-zi 孟子. After comparing the characteristics of the works quoted by Meng-zi with those of the works quoted in Zuo-zhuan 左伝, the author proposes that the trends indicative of the Meng-zi quotations were influenced by the fact the Mencius both studied and was active in the kingdom of Zi 斉. Also, regarding the "Yao-Dian" 堯典, the annals of Emperor Yao 帝 and his successor Shun 舜, the author is of the opinion that a school of thought completely different from the Meng-zi tradition wrote the text concerning the legend of how the succession took place, and while Mencius of course refers to the intellectual gap here, he does not accept it. In other words, during his lifetime, Mencius was only on part of the effort by the state and academia to compile the Shang-shu, resulting in differences not only with regard to the date of compilation, but also of a regional nature, which gave rise to the intellectual diversity found in the work. Therefore when studying the developmental process of the Shang-shu, it is necessary to not only follow that process through the early and middle Warring States Period, as argued by Matsumoto, but also to continue through to the end of the Period in order to trace all of its origins.
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 116 Issue 11 Pages 1764-1766
    Published: November 20, 2007
    Released: December 01, 2017
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  • Umi OOYABU
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 116 Issue 11 Pages 1767-1788
    Published: November 20, 2007
    Released: December 01, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In recent years a revival has occurred in the research done by Kawaoka Tsutomu in the idea of a Muromachi Bakufu power structure whose major players were the Bakufu in Kyoto and its appointed military executives (shugo 守護) in the provinces. The author of this article argues that such a characterization places too much emphasis on the role of shugo, in that there were figures who were never appointed to that position but nevertheless wielded as much power and influence and should be looked upon as "de facto shugo." For this reason, in order to better understand the Bakufu's power structure, it is necessary to re-confirm the political forces looked upon to date as "shugo," first in terms of those appointed to the position and those not, and to then consider the kind of relationship which those who were not appointed enjoyed with the Bakufu. The present article focuses on the Kitabatake Family of Ise Province as a typical example of Bakufu vassals who were granted fiefs (chigyo 知行) but not appointed military governors, and because of that fact have been defined in the research to date as "partial" or "quasi" shugo. After an examination of the Kitabatake Family's authorization to issue directives on behalf of the Bakufu (jungyo 遵行) and its military administration of Ise Province, the author points out that 1) the Kitabakes were not appointed to the position of shugo until the Bunmei Era (1469-1487), and 2) prior to Bunmei, the family's deputization and military recruiting in Ise connected them to the Bakufu without the mediation of a shugo appointment, showing that the Bakufu included powerful regional figures other than shugo families. The article also discusses the authority wielded by the Kitabatake Family within its fief, and its activities outside of that fief, namely its control of access to the Ise Shrine, in order to examine critically the existing understanding about the basis on which the office of shugo existed, arguing that 1) such authority as control over access to shrines cannot be understood as falling within the jurisdiction of the office of shugo, and 2) calling the Kitabatake Family the "provincial governor of Ise" (Ise-kokushi 伊勢 国司) meant something altogether different. The author concludes that in order to understand the power structure of the Muromachi Bakufu, it is necessary to transcend the Bakufu-Shugo connection and focus on other kinds of Bakufu vassal (chigyoshu 知行主) on sub-provincial levels, for example.
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  • Akiko MATSUDA
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 116 Issue 11 Pages 1789-1811
    Published: November 20, 2007
    Released: December 01, 2017
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    Adopting the perspectives of urban social history and local history, this paper reveals the structure of the brewers' guild of Yamato Koriyama's late premodern castle town. In Koriyama there were sixty-three officially recognized brewing permits (shuzo kabu), and the total annual allowance of rice for brewing (shuzo daka) was 11,376 koku. The brewing industry prospered during the Genroku era, but went into decline from the Tenmei era on. The domain's policy toward brewers may be summarized as follows: 1) In order to convert its tribute rice into silver, the domain designated a market where brewers could purchase rice for their raw materials; and in exchange, brewers were allowed hold a monopoly on the wholesale and retail of sake within the town. 2) The brewers' guild required the domain's approval in setting the price of sake, which they established every year in the fourth and tenth months. However, as a result of a petition by the brewers in Bunsei 5 (1822), the latter policy was changed, allowing the brewers to set prices without the domain's approval. At the beginning of the late premodern period, the top-ranking town officials, called hakomoto, were in charge of supervising the local brewers. However, when the Bakufu imposed a levy on brewers in Genroku 10 (1697), the brewers elected an official (aratame yaku) among themselves to collect the tax. Consequently, this official had assumed total management of the brewers by Shotoku 1 (1711). Later during the Tenmei period, the aratame yaku temporarily stepped down, as a new administrative position was created, served by brewers themselves on a monthly rotating basis. At the same time, the administrative system became stratified, with some duties performed by bureaucrats who were not part of the brewing industry. Retail merchants (ukezakaya), who were responsible for most of the sake sold in Koriyama, often failed to pay for merchandise they had purchased on credit, threatening the brewing industry, so the brewers decided to organize the merchants into branch shops, over which the brewers would exercise control. Retail merchants also received official permits, but eventually unlicensed retailers emerged. The brewers' guild was able to maintain this organization of branch shops after an investigation conducted during the Genroku period, but after another investigation during the Kyoho period, the retail merchants were organized into a guild of their own, and the two guilds, each with their own concerns, developed a complex relationship. The retail merchants' business interests gradually changed and during the late eighteenth century began selling sake produced outside of the castle town (tasho zake), causing a declined in the local brewing industry. This practice reveals the difficulties that the brewers encountered in organizing retail merchants.
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  • Yuki IKEWADA
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 116 Issue 11 Pages 1812-1821
    Published: November 20, 2007
    Released: December 01, 2017
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  • Kiyora KOMIYA
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 116 Issue 11 Pages 1822-1826
    Published: November 20, 2007
    Released: December 01, 2017
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  • Tsuyoshi WAKATSUKI
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 116 Issue 11 Pages 1826-1834
    Published: November 20, 2007
    Released: December 01, 2017
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  • Hitoshi TAKAHASHI
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 116 Issue 11 Pages 1834-1839
    Published: November 20, 2007
    Released: December 01, 2017
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 116 Issue 11 Pages 1840-1841
    Published: November 20, 2007
    Released: December 01, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 116 Issue 11 Pages 1841-1842
    Published: November 20, 2007
    Released: December 01, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (257K)
  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 116 Issue 11 Pages 1842-1843
    Published: November 20, 2007
    Released: December 01, 2017
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    Download PDF (248K)
  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 116 Issue 11 Pages 1843-1844
    Published: November 20, 2007
    Released: December 01, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (240K)
  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 116 Issue 11 Pages 1844-1845
    Published: November 20, 2007
    Released: December 01, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (215K)
  • [Author not found]
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 116 Issue 11 Pages 1880-1876
    Published: November 20, 2007
    Released: December 01, 2017
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    Download PDF (291K)
  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 116 Issue 11 Pages 1875-1846
    Published: November 20, 2007
    Released: December 01, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2007 Volume 116 Issue 11 Pages App1-
    Published: November 20, 2007
    Released: December 01, 2017
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    Download PDF (41K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2007 Volume 116 Issue 11 Pages App2-
    Published: November 20, 2007
    Released: December 01, 2017
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    Download PDF (41K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2007 Volume 116 Issue 11 Pages App3-
    Published: November 20, 2007
    Released: December 01, 2017
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    Download PDF (41K)
  • Type: Cover
    2007 Volume 116 Issue 11 Pages Cover3-
    Published: November 20, 2007
    Released: December 01, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (47K)
  • Type: Cover
    2007 Volume 116 Issue 11 Pages Cover4-
    Published: November 20, 2007
    Released: December 01, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (47K)
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