SHIGAKU ZASSHI
Online ISSN : 2424-2616
Print ISSN : 0018-2478
ISSN-L : 0018-2478
Volume 97 , Issue 3
Showing 1-17 articles out of 17 articles from the selected issue
  • Type: Cover
    1988 Volume 97 Issue 3 Pages Cover1-
    Published: March 20, 1988
    Released: November 29, 2017
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  • Type: Cover
    1988 Volume 97 Issue 3 Pages Cover2-
    Published: March 20, 1988
    Released: November 29, 2017
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  • Naoto Furusawa
    Type: Article
    1988 Volume 97 Issue 3 Pages 281-320,424-42
    Published: March 20, 1988
    Released: November 29, 2017
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    In Nanbokucho Period, The syugo are said to have been given the official power of compulsory execution of judicial decision of the Bakufu. It is said to be one of the most important elements in the process of their coming to feudal power. In the preceding Kamakura period, that duty was regarded to have been performed by two emisarries (Ryousi) appointed directly by the Bakufu. But in Kaniakura period, legislation concerning compulsory execution only appeared in the 1280s. The epoch-making event about it was the application of legal measures named Gechiihai-no-toga which intended to punish all the violations against judgements issued by the Bakufu. This legislation corresponded to Ichoku which was provided by the royal court and intended to punish severely violations against the laws and judgments issued by the court. One of its serious influences was a sudden increase in settlements out of court. That private settlement, however, obliged to performance under the same legeislation. In addition, it applied to all Kuge-Honjos that originally belonged to the court, which had been rarely done before. In short it summarily fixed and made enforceable all relationships concerning rights. The historical background of thislegislation is seen in the various wartime conditions after from the 1270s. First, the enemy was not only the Mongols but also Akuto (rebels against the court and the Bakufu). Second, economic conditions and military organization became worse and worse in those times. Facing these crises, the Bakufu had to concentrate all. its powers internally and command its military force, some of which originally belonged to the Kuge-Honjos. For that reason the Bakufu was forced to take responsibility to surpress all violations against the Kuge-Honjos. Considering the Kuge-Honjos were more and more dependent on the Bakufu in those crises, this move was not simplely the Bakufu's interfering with the Honjos, but rather a complex unification-concluding serious opposition. The reason why the Bakufu took such strong measures was the essence of its military goverment that took total control in wartime. The result was that all the revolts against ruling classes concentrated on Bakufu, leading to its downfall.
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  • Kazuhiko Kondo
    Type: Article
    1988 Volume 97 Issue 3 Pages 321-357,423-42
    Published: March 20, 1988
    Released: November 29, 2017
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    Manchester in the eighteenth century has been associated with the coming of the industrial revolution. Certainly it would become one of the leading centres of the capitalist world economy in the nineteenth century, but it was still 'one of the greatest mere villages in England', famous for its textile trade, with a population of some twenty thousand, in the age of Defoe and Walpole. More significantly for the purpose of this paper the parish of Manchester was in the diocese of Chester, a part of the country notorious for party strife and as 'disaffected'. The collegiate parish church was a stronghold of high church clergymen, while the parish contained a sizeable cluster of dissenters (mainly presbyterians) which amounted to 422 families out of 3201, i.e. more than 13% of the whole and more than twice the national average of 6.2%. My analysis in this paper is focused first on the clerical quarrels within the collegiate church of Manchester from 1718 to 1728. Samuel Peploe (1668-1752), who had proved his spirit against the Jacobites in 1715 as vicar of Preston, was promoted by the whig government warden of Manchester in 1718 (and then bishop of Chester in 1726). He would have to face hard years in dealing with the high churchmen and non-jurors in the church and the parish. Secondly the workhouse project and the opposition in the town are analysed from 1729 to 1731. John Byrom (1692-1763), a high churchman of letters and stenographer, was one of the most active opponents of the scheme. His correspondence, diaries and poems, together with parliamentary and other sources, reveal a good deal of the hitherto hidden social alignments of the Mancunians and clarify other often misrepresented circumstances. Factious rivalry infected the town, and such public projects as an incorporated workhouse were doomed to failure by the opposition of high churchmen (tories), who feared that the alliance of low churchmen and dissenters (whigs) might dominate not only the incorporated trust, but also the administration and finance of the town. The intended bill for the workhouse became an issue of party politics in Parliament, and was defeated in April 1731 by an alliance of tories and whig opposition members. Byrom's return to Manchester on 10 June (the Pretender's birthday) was welcomed at the collegiate church, where Peploe remained beset as warden. The sources I rest upon are both local and central, unpublished and published, v. notes. I have edited the most relevant documents relating to the workhouse issue in the Bulletin of the Faculty of Letters, Nagoya University, vol.33 (1987). The article containing the selected documents is abbreviated as WH, and referred to on page 45 (note 4).
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  • Shinzo Hayase
    Type: Article
    1988 Volume 97 Issue 3 Pages 358-365
    Published: March 20, 1988
    Released: November 29, 2017
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  • Kenzo Fujinawa
    Type: Article
    1988 Volume 97 Issue 3 Pages 365-377
    Published: March 20, 1988
    Released: November 29, 2017
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1988 Volume 97 Issue 3 Pages 378-379
    Published: March 20, 1988
    Released: November 29, 2017
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1988 Volume 97 Issue 3 Pages 379-380
    Published: March 20, 1988
    Released: November 29, 2017
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1988 Volume 97 Issue 3 Pages 380-384
    Published: March 20, 1988
    Released: November 29, 2017
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1988 Volume 97 Issue 3 Pages 384-385
    Published: March 20, 1988
    Released: November 29, 2017
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1988 Volume 97 Issue 3 Pages 385-387
    Published: March 20, 1988
    Released: November 29, 2017
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1988 Volume 97 Issue 3 Pages 387-
    Published: March 20, 1988
    Released: November 29, 2017
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  • Type: Article
    1988 Volume 97 Issue 3 Pages 388-421
    Published: March 20, 1988
    Released: November 29, 2017
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  • Type: Article
    1988 Volume 97 Issue 3 Pages 422-424
    Published: March 20, 1988
    Released: November 29, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    1988 Volume 97 Issue 3 Pages App1-
    Published: March 20, 1988
    Released: November 29, 2017
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  • Type: Cover
    1988 Volume 97 Issue 3 Pages Cover3-
    Published: March 20, 1988
    Released: November 29, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (29K)
  • Type: Cover
    1988 Volume 97 Issue 3 Pages Cover4-
    Published: March 20, 1988
    Released: November 29, 2017
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