Food Hygiene and Safety Science (Shokuhin Eiseigaku Zasshi)
Online ISSN : 1882-1006
Print ISSN : 0015-6426
ISSN-L : 0015-6426
Volume 18 , Issue 1
Showing 1-14 articles out of 14 articles from the selected issue
  • Analysis by Apiezon L Column
    Akio NAKAMURA, Takashi KASHIMOTO
    1977 Volume 18 Issue 1 Pages 1-12_1
    Published: February 05, 1977
    Released: December 11, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    For the quantitative analysis of the environmental contamination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), the authors reported several methods, i. e. gas chromatographic (GC) pattern method, comparative relative response method, GC-MCD (microcoulometric detector) and mass fragmentography methods.
    By means of conventional GC separation (OV-1, 2mm×1.5m column) we separated approx. only 25 peaks, in which more than two components were suspected to be contained.
    So this makes it difficult to qualify the residue of PCBs biodegradated in the environment.
    Recently Jensen et al. reported more effective GC column separation by the use of 5m Apiezon (purified) column and identified each peak to synthesized reference substances (almost 60 components) of PCB isomers.
    It was certified that there was no difference in patterns between Clophen series and Japanese Kaneclors by GC analysis. Applying this technique for Japanese products (KC300-600), the authors determined chlorine numbers by GC-MS analysis and chlorobiphenyl contents (%) in each peak by means of comparative relative response method.
    From these data, we clarified the difference of PCB components in blood between a healthy man and a Yusho patient. It is uncleared yet whether it depends on PCB itself or polychlorinated dibenzofuran (PCDF).
    The application of this calculation method makes it possible not only to measure the absolute quantity of individual peaks, but also to elucidate the mobility of PCBs in the animal tissue.
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  • Koei MINAGAWA, Yukio TAKIZAWA
    1977 Volume 18 Issue 1 Pages 13-19_1
    Published: February 05, 1977
    Released: December 11, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In this paper, the quantitative distribution of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) in brown rice polluted with Cd, and the removal of these elements by means of various eluting agents were described.
    1) Cd, Cu and Zn in brown rice were distributed very evenly.
    2) The brown rice or polished rice was crushed in a grain mill, and mixed with an eluting solution such as water, ethanol, inorganic acid, organic acid or chelating agent.
    After filtration of the mixture, the filtrate and the residues were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrometry.
    Efficiency of the elution was calculated as the ratio of metal found in the eluted solution to those values found in rice before elution.
    More than 90% of the Cd and Zn in the crushed brown rice was removed with tartaric acid solution. The value of Cu was comparatively lower. Stirring, immersing time and pH largely influenced the elution of Cd, Cu and Zn.
    3) From brown rice grain, efficiency of the elution of Cd, Cu and Zn with 0.1M tartaric acid solution after 150 hours was about 98%, 40% and 90%, respectively, and from polished rice grain about 74%, 90% and 68%, respectively.
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  • Analytical Method for Captan and Captafol in Agricultural Crops
    Mitsuharu TAKEDA, Hiroshi SEKITA, Mitsuru UCHIYAMA
    1977 Volume 18 Issue 1 Pages 20-25_1
    Published: February 05, 1977
    Released: December 11, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    An attempt was made to improve an analytical method for captan and captafol residues in agricaltural crops contaminated with organochlorine insecticides (BHC isomers, pp′-DDT and its analogues and chlorinated cyclodiene compounds) by ECD-gas chromatography.
    It was difficult to separate fungicides, captan and captafol, from the organochlorine insecticides by gas chromatographic method, but use of Florisil column chromatography render it possible. Namely, the insecticides and the fungicides were eluted with 15% ether in hexane and 30% ethyl acetate in hexane, respectively. The second eluate containing the fungicides was then purified by activated charcoal column chromatography with 50% ether in hexane. Removal of oily materials by the partition between acetonitrile and hexane was necessary prior to Florisil column chromatography for summer oranges (peels), dried string beans and wheat.
    The detection limits in present gas chromatographic conditions were 0.005-0.63μg in captan and 0.02-2.0μg in captafol. The recoveries of captan and captafol fortified to agricultural crops were 72.2-90.6% and 79.5-95.0%, respectively.
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  • Yoshio ITO, Masatake TOYODA, Masahiro IWAIDA
    1977 Volume 18 Issue 1 Pages 26-32_1
    Published: February 05, 1977
    Released: December 11, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A simultaneous detection and determination procedure of thiophanate methyl, its metabolites (methyl benzimidazole carbamate; MBC, aminobenzimidazole; AB) and mono-sec-butylamine; BA) were established.
    These fungicides or insecticides are widely used in the cultivation of vegetables and fruits. Thiophanate methyl is known to be metabolized in plants remaining in the form of MBC and AB.
    In order to elevate the detection level of these compounds, benzenesulfone derivatives of them were prepared, which were then subjected for the gas chromatographic determination by use of an FPD-gas chromatograph. Ethyl acetate was adopted as the extracting solvent of these compounds from plants. Because of the volatility of BA, it was impossible to concentrate ethyl acetate extract, and so the latter clean-up was carried out by use of alumina column chromatography (Merck Art. 1097 Aluminiumoxid standardisiert was chosen), applying ethyl acetate and methanol-water mixture (5:5) as eluant, in turn. Methanol water fraction was collected making each 15ml as one fraction. It was confirmed that the above-mentioned compounds were eluted almost all into Fraction No. 2 of methanol-water mixture. The fraction was extracted again with ethyl acetate and, after benzenesulfonation, the derivatives were concentrated and injected into an FPD-gas chromatograph. The conditions finally adopted are as follow. Column ∅3mm×75cm in length packed with 1.5% SE-30 on Chromosorb G60/80, column temperature: 165°C for the detetion and determination of BA and TPM (thiophanate methyl), 200°C for the detection and determination of MBC and AB.
    The detection level was 0.01ppm for BA, 0.02ppm for AB and MBC and 0.04ppm for TPM. Recoveries of these compounds from orange peel and cucumber were about 90% in case spiked on 0.5ppm level, while 80-85% spiked on 0.1ppm level.
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  • Akinobu WATANABE, Masakazu TOKUMARU, Tomoko IKEUCHI, Hiroyuki MASAKI, ...
    1977 Volume 18 Issue 1 Pages 33-38_1
    Published: February 05, 1977
    Released: December 11, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The preservative effects of propionic acid for bread and sponge cake stored at 25°C was investigated.
    The results obtained were as follows:
    1) Addition of 0.25% propionic acid in sponge cake and bread prolonged their shelflife for two days as compared with the non-addition of propionic acid as revealed by sensory test.
    The sponge cake and bread with added propionic acid at the level of 0.25% maintained their quality for four to five days as shown by the bacterial, molds, yeasts counts.
    2) In the inoculated studies using Bacillus subtilis results showed that in the nonaddition of propionic acid it exhibited Rope in bread, four days after inoculation. On the other hand, the bread with added propionic acid at the level of 0.25% could be preserved for seven days at about 25°C.
    While the sponge cake with added 0.25% propionic acid could be preserved for three weeks without the appearance of rope.
    3) In the inoculated groups of molds, Aspergillus niger and Penicillium expansum which were allowed to grow in the sponge cake and bread which treated with 0.25% propionic acid, but Mucor sp. was not allowed to grow on it.
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  • Susumu HORIE, Hiroshi ANDO, Masaaki ABE
    1977 Volume 18 Issue 1 Pages 39-43_1
    Published: February 05, 1977
    Released: December 11, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Enumeration and isolation of enterococci in 72 samples of commercial frozen foods were carried out by using AE (Azide Esculin) agar plates. Among 561 strains which isolated from 61 samples, 447 strains from 58 samples were identified with enterococci by the completed test: gram positive cocci, negative catalase test, growth in 6.5% Sodium chloride glucose broth, and final pH in glucose broth between 4.0 and 4.4. These enterococcal isolates were divided into the species according to the “MSAG” tests, fermentation of mannitol, sorbitol and arabinose, and liquefaction of gelatine. Ninty five strains (21.3%) of Streptococcus faecalis were recovered from 32 samples, 102 (22.8%) of S. faecalis subsp, liquefaciens from 32 samples, 212 (47.4%) of S. faecium from 40 samples, 15 (3.4%) of S. durans from 7 samples, 23 (5.1%) of atypical forms were isolated from 14 samples. In order to investigate the result of identification tests mentioned above, 133 of the enterococcal isolates were examined by the 6 additional tests: fermentation of glycerol, melezitose and melibiose, nutritional requirement of folic acid, reduction of triphenyltetrazolium chloride, and resistance to 0.04% potassium tellurite. The results showed that most of the enterococcal species which had been primarily determined by the “MSAG” tests were approved after the additional 6 tests.
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  • Aiko OHSHIMA
    1977 Volume 18 Issue 1 Pages 44-47_1
    Published: February 05, 1977
    Released: December 11, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    On gas chromatographic determination of preservatives in wine, there was a peak on the gaschromatogram which seemed to be one of the ordinary constituents of wine, near the peak of benzoic acid. The peak obstructed the analysis on some conditions of gas chromatography. The constituent of the obstacle was identified as ethyl succinate and detected from red and white wines and raw material wines. Then we confirmed that it was impossible to distinguish it from benzoic acid on some temperature conditions of gas chromatography.
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  • Study on Determination of Aflatoxins by High Performance Liquid Chromatography
    Etsuko ISOHATA, Yuiko TAKEDA, Mitsuru UCHIYAMA
    1977 Volume 18 Issue 1 Pages 48-52_1
    Published: February 05, 1977
    Released: December 11, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    High-performance liquid chromatography of Aflatoins was carried out by using two kinds of column packings.
    Silicagel (Iatrobeads 6RS-8010) yielded satisfactory separation of Aflatoxin B1, B2, G1, G2, by eluting with dichloromethane-chloroform-methanol (60:40:0.15) or chloroform-iso-octane-iso-propanol (75:25:0.5), whereas porous polymergel (Iatrobeads 6CP-2010) could be applied for the clear separation of B-group and G-group aflatoxins from patulin and penicillic acid.
    The detection of aflatoxins was performed with UV-254nm or UV-360nm, while the latter is more recommendable to avoid the disturbance with coexisting materials.
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  • Residue of Ethylenethiourea (2-Imidazolidinethione) in Agricultural Products
    Masakiyo UNO, Eiji UEDA, Tukuru OKADA, Yoshiki ONJI
    1977 Volume 18 Issue 1 Pages 53-56_1
    Published: February 05, 1977
    Released: December 11, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Ethylenethiourea (ETU) and ethylene-bis-dithiocarbamate in agricultural products were determined, according to improved Newsomes' method.
    The improved analytical method consists of five procedures, extraction with methanol or methanol: water mixture (8:2), conversion to the S-benzyl derivative, clean up with benzene: n-hexane mixture (1:1), trifluoroacetylation, and quantitative mesurement by gas liquid chromatography.
    Specific confirmation of the derivative was carried out by mass spectrometry.
    The efficiency of the analytical method was applicable to sixteen agricultural products, and was evaluated by taking a good repeatability and taking away an obstraction.
    Three samples were found to contain 0.008-0.076ppm of ethylenethiourea, and 0.34-1.21ppm of ethilene-bis-dithiocarbamate.
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  • Hajimu ISHIWATA, Hiroko MIZUSHIRO, Akio TANIMURA, Toshiro MURATA
    1977 Volume 18 Issue 1 Pages 57-58
    Published: February 05, 1977
    Released: December 11, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Norihiko MATSUDA, Naoki MATSUMOTO, Yoko KAKEGAWA
    1977 Volume 18 Issue 1 Pages 59-61
    Published: February 05, 1977
    Released: December 11, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Heavy Metals Contents in Processed Foods
    Katsuhiko IKEBE, YUKIO TANAKA, Ryoichi TANAKA, Nobuharu KUNITA
    1977 Volume 18 Issue 1 Pages 62-74
    Published: February 05, 1977
    Released: December 11, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
  • Extents and Average Contents of Heavy Metals in Vegetable Foods
    Yukio TANAKA, Katsuhiko IKEBE, Ryoichi TANAKA, Nobuharu KUNITA
    1977 Volume 18 Issue 1 Pages 75-85
    Published: February 05, 1977
    Released: December 11, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Contents of Heavy Metals in Fishes, Shellfishes, Meates, Poultries and Whales
    Katsuhiko IKEBE, Yukio TANAKA, Ryoichi TANAKA, Nobuharu KUNITA
    1977 Volume 18 Issue 1 Pages 86-97
    Published: February 05, 1977
    Released: December 11, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (860K)
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