Food Hygiene and Safety Science (Shokuhin Eiseigaku Zasshi)
Online ISSN : 1882-1006
Print ISSN : 0015-6426
ISSN-L : 0015-6426
Volume 24 , Issue 5
Showing 1-23 articles out of 23 articles from the selected issue
  • Yoshihiro HORI
    1983 Volume 24 Issue 5 Pages 447-453_1
    Published: October 05, 1983
    Released: December 11, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A high performance liquid chromatographic method was developed for determining eleven synthetic antibacterials in chickens and eggs.
    Synthetic antibacterials in the acetonitrile extract from chicken muscle and egg were adsorbed on an alumina column and were eluted with 10ml of 85% methanol and then with 25ml of a mixture of methanol, acetic acid and water (30:0.4:70) as fraction I (sulfa drugs). The 85% methanol eluate was passed through a SEP-PAK C18 column. Clopidol, dinitolmide and ethopabate were eluted with 15ml of 20% acetonitrile as fraction II, and then nicarbazin and pyrimethamine were eluted with 20ml of a mixture of acetnitrile, acetic acid and water (40:1:60) as fraction III. Each fraction was quantitatively analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. The detection limit of each drug was 0.05ppm in chicken muscles and eggs. The average recoveries of all drugs added to chicken muscles and eggs were more than 80%.
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  • Hideaki YAMANAKA, Masaaki KUNO, Kazuo SHIOMI, Takeaki KIKUCHI
    1983 Volume 24 Issue 5 Pages 454-458_1
    Published: October 05, 1983
    Released: December 11, 2009
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    An enzymatic analysis was developed in order to determine oxalate in many kinds of foods. Oxalate was converted into formate by oxalate decarboxylase, then formate dehydrogenase was added in the presence of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide. Contents of oxalate were calculated from the increase in absorbance at 340nm due to reduced nucleotide-adenine dinucleotide produced.
    Oxalate concentrations were determined in various kinds of foods (61 vegetable and 30 animal). High concentrations of oxalate were found in several vegetables, e. g., spinach (1760mg/100g), New Zealand spinach (894mg/100g) and green tea (426mg/100g). In the case of spinach, the oxalate content tended to increase with the extent of growth of the plants. Algae such as green layer (193mg/100g) and Tengusa (165mg/100g) had fairly high oxalate contents. Animal foods contained lower levels of oxalate. The content of oxalate in fish muscle was 0.3 to 3.7mg/100g and that of beef was 8.0mg/100g.
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  • Yoshio YAMAURA, Shigehisa KOMIYAMA, Morio FUKUHARA, Eigo TAKABATAKE, T ...
    1983 Volume 24 Issue 5 Pages 459-464_1
    Published: October 05, 1983
    Released: December 11, 2009
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    The biochemical effects of mushroom extracts were studied in order to classify poisonous mushrooms in terms of their biochemical effects; this would provide useful information for clinical treatment. The species of mushrooms studied were Amanita muscaria, Amanita pantherina and Amanita rubrovolvata, which are known to cause nervous system disorder in man.
    After intraperitoneal injection of aqueous extract of A. muscaria into male mice, biochemical changes in the serum and liver were noted within 3 hours, but the values returned to normal within 6 hours after the injection. The activity of serum cholinesterase was decreased moderately at 30 minutes after the injection. The liver glycogen was decreased at 1 hour after the injection. The blood glucose level was increased at 1 hour and decreased at 3 hours after the injection. The blood urea nitrogen was decreased significantly, but serum transaminase activities were unaffected. Among the poisonous mushrooms examined, A. rubrovolvata was the most potent.
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  • Junichi MARUYAMA, Tamao NOGUCHI, Joong-Kyun JEON, Kimio YAMAZAKI, Kane ...
    1983 Volume 24 Issue 5 Pages 465-468_1
    Published: October 05, 1983
    Released: December 11, 2009
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    In December 1982, an outbreak of paralytic poisoning occurred due to ingestion of the viscera of a trumpet shell (“boshubora”, Charonia sauliae) in Wakayama Prefecture. Many specimens of this gastropod were collected from adjacent waters and analyzed for toxicity by the routine assay method for tetrodotoxin (TTX). Most of the specimens were toxic: the highest toxicity was 480MU/g digestive gland, and the highest total toxicity per specimen was 37, 000MU.
    Attempts were made to isolate the toxin from the toxic digestive glands by a TTX isolation method, which consisted of activated charcoal treatment and chromatography on CM-Sephadex C-25 and Bio-Rex 70. The toxin thus isolated possessed a specific activity of 3, 700MU/mg. It showed thin-layer chromatographic and electrophoretic properties indistinguishable from those of authentic TTX. Both toxins exhibited an identical 1H-NMR spectrum.
    It was concluded from these results that the toxin responsible for this incident of paralytic poisoning was TTX.
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  • Acid and Hexamethaphosphate to Escherichia coli JE 1011
    Kazue TATSUGUCHI, Tadao WATANABE
    1983 Volume 24 Issue 5 Pages 469-473_1
    Published: October 05, 1983
    Released: December 11, 2009
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    Hexamethaphosphate (HP), which is used for improving the quality of processed foods, showed antimicrobial action against gram-positive bacteria, but not against gram-negative ones. Exponentially grown cells of Escherichia coli JE1011 were heated at 45°C, 48°C or 50°C in 0.05M phosphate buffer containing 0.1% HP or HP-free buffer. In nutrient broth, the growth of the former cells was delayed by 2-8 hours as compared with that of the latter cells. The cells heated at 48°C or 50°C in the presence of HP showed poor colony formation on deoxycholate agar medium (DOC). After being heated at 50°C for over 20min, the cells could not grow on DOC. HP produced an increased leakage of cellular materials from the cells during heating. These results indicate that HP amplified the cell surface damage caused by heating.
    Esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (PHBAE) are excellent preservatives unaffected by pH, but their antimicrobial action against gram-negative bacteria is weak. In the presence of HP, PHBAE showed a strong antimicrobial action against Escherichia coli JE1011. The effect became stronger as the alkyl chain length was increased. Synergistic antimicrobial action of PHBAE and HP was further enhanced by heating at higher temperature and with increasing hydrophobicity of PHBAE. PHBAE should thus be effective as a food preservative when used in conjunction with mild heating and in the presence of HP.
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  • Hiroshi NAKANISHI, Taizo TSUDA
    1983 Volume 24 Issue 5 Pages 474-479_1
    Published: October 05, 1983
    Released: December 11, 2009
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    A gas chromatographic procedure for determining monoglycerides in several kinds of foods is described. The monoglycerides were extracted with chloroform-methanol (1:1) from the samples. The extract was evaporated to dryness, and the residue was dissolved in cyclohexane-ether (1:1) and applied to a column of silica gel. Monoglycerides were eluted with chloroform-methanol-ether (2:2:1). The eluate was evaporated to dryness and derivatized with pyridine, hexamethyldisilazane and trimethylchlorosilane at room temperature. Gas-liquid chromatographic separation of monoglycerides as their TMS derivatives was performed on a 10% Silar 10C column at 180°C, with a flame ionization detector.
    Recoveries of monoglycerides from food samples fortified with 500μg or 5000μg were 87.6-89.4% and coefficients of variation were 4.74-6.41%. The total contents of monoglycerides in commercial foods were calculated by adding individual monoglyceride contents. For example, margarines contained 0.09-0.25% monoglycerides.
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  • Studies on the Behavior of Several Elements in Food. II
    Katsuhiko IKEBE, Ryoichi TANAKA, Masahiko IKEDA
    1983 Volume 24 Issue 5 Pages 480-483_1
    Published: October 05, 1983
    Released: December 11, 2009
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    The determination of antimony in food by hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrophotometry with an electrically heated quartz cell atomizer and using sodium borohydride solution as the reductant was investigated.
    The calibration curve was linear in the range from 0.01ppm to 0.1ppm of antimony. Good recoveries of 94-100% were obtained for antimony added to canned peach samples, and the limit of detection was 0.002ppm.
    This analytical method was used for the determination of antimony in various foods. Analytical results for hen clam, mussel, top-shell (viscera), grapefruit (peel) and persimmon leaf tea were 0.013ppm, 0.019ppm, 0.022ppm, 0.019ppm and 0.033ppm antimony, respectively. The concentrations of antimony in cereals and beverages were below the detection limit of 0.002ppm of this method.
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  • Yoji KASUGA, Akira SUGITANI, Fujizo YAMADA
    1983 Volume 24 Issue 5 Pages 484-487_1
    Published: October 05, 1983
    Released: December 11, 2009
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    A high-performance liquid chromatographic method for identification of oxolinic acid and two major metabolites of piromidic acid, 2-OHPA (8-ethyl-5, 8-dihydro-5-oxo-2-(2-hydroxypyrolidine)-pyrido [2, 3-d]-pyrimidine-6-carboxylic acid) and 3-OHPA (8-ethyl-5, 8-dihydro-5-oxo-2-(3-hydroxypyrolidine)-pyrido [2, 3-d]-pyrimidine-6-carboxylic acid), has been established.
    Reversed phase ion-pair chromatography for the separation of these substances was performed on a stainless steel column packed with LiChrosorb RP-18 (10μm), with phosphate buffer (pH 6.4)-methanol (14:11v/v%) containing 0.05% counter-ion (trimethylammonium bromide) as the mobile phase and with detection by absorbance measurement at 330nm.
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  • Contents of Heavy Metals in Foods VII
    Ryoichi TANAKA, Katsuhiko IKEBE, Yukio TANAKA, Nobuharu KUNITA
    1983 Volume 24 Issue 5 Pages 488-499
    Published: October 05, 1983
    Released: December 11, 2009
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  • [in Japanese]
    1983 Volume 24 Issue 5 Pages 501
    Published: October 05, 1983
    Released: December 11, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japane ...
    1983 Volume 24 Issue 5 Pages 502-503
    Published: October 05, 1983
    Released: December 11, 2009
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  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese]
    1983 Volume 24 Issue 5 Pages 504-505
    Published: October 05, 1983
    Released: December 11, 2009
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  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese]
    1983 Volume 24 Issue 5 Pages 505-507
    Published: October 05, 1983
    Released: December 11, 2009
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  • [in Japanese]
    1983 Volume 24 Issue 5 Pages 507-508
    Published: October 05, 1983
    Released: December 11, 2009
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  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese]
    1983 Volume 24 Issue 5 Pages 508-509
    Published: October 05, 1983
    Released: December 11, 2009
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  • [in Japanese]
    1983 Volume 24 Issue 5 Pages 510-511
    Published: October 05, 1983
    Released: December 11, 2009
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  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japane ...
    1983 Volume 24 Issue 5 Pages 511-512
    Published: October 05, 1983
    Released: December 11, 2009
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  • [in Japanese]
    1983 Volume 24 Issue 5 Pages 512-513
    Published: October 05, 1983
    Released: December 11, 2009
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  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japane ...
    1983 Volume 24 Issue 5 Pages 514-515
    Published: October 05, 1983
    Released: December 11, 2009
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  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese]
    1983 Volume 24 Issue 5 Pages 515
    Published: October 05, 1983
    Released: December 11, 2009
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  • [in Japanese]
    1983 Volume 24 Issue 5 Pages 516-517
    Published: October 05, 1983
    Released: December 11, 2009
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  • 1983 Volume 24 Issue 5 Pages 523a
    Published: 1983
    Released: December 11, 2009
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  • 1983 Volume 24 Issue 5 Pages 523b
    Published: 1983
    Released: December 11, 2009
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